Coverart for item
The Resource 3G, 4G and Beyond : Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together, (electronic book)

3G, 4G and Beyond : Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together, (electronic book)

Label
3G, 4G and Beyond : Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together
Title
3G, 4G and Beyond
Title remainder
Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Extensively updated evaluation of current and future network technologies, applications and devices  This book follows on from its successful predecessor with an introduction to next generation network technologies, mobile devices, voice and multimedia services and the mobile web 2.0.  Giving a sound technical introduction to 3GPP wireless systems, this book explains the decisions taken during standardization of the most popular wireless network standards today, LTE, LTE-Advanced and HSPA+.  It discusses how these elements strongly influence each other and how network capabilities, available bandwidth, mobile device capabilities and new application concepts will shape the way we communicate in the future.  This Second Edition presents a comprehensive and broad-reaching examination of a fast-moving technology which will be a welcome update for researchers and professionals alike.  Key features: Fully updated and expanded to include new sections including VoLTE, the evolution to 4G, mobile Internet access, LTE-Advanced, Wi-Fi security and backhaul for wireless networks Describes the successful commercialization of Web 2.0 services such as Facebook, and the emergence of app stores, tablets and smartphones Examines the evolution of mobile devices and operating systems, including ARM and x86 architecture and their application to voice-optimized and multimedia devices
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sauter, Martin
Dewey number
  • 384.5
  • 621.382
LC call number
TK5103.4885 .S38 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Long-Term Evolution (Telecommunications)
  • Mobile communication systems
  • Mobile computing
  • Smartphones
Label
3G, 4G and Beyond : Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Evolution from 2G over 3G to 4G -- 1.1 First Half of the 1990s-Voice-Centric Communication -- 1.2 Between 1995 and 2000: The Rise of Mobility and the Internet -- 1.3 Between 2000 and 2005: Dot Com Burst, Web 2.0, Mobile Internet -- 1.4 Between 2005 and 2010: Global Coverage, Fixed Line VoIP, and Mobile Broadband -- 1.5 2010 and Beyond -- 1.6 All over IP in Mobile-The Biggest Challenge -- 1.7 Summary -- Chapter 2 Beyond 3G Network Architectures -- 2.1 Overview -- 2.2 UMTS, HSPA, and HSPA+ -- 2.2.1 Introduction -- 2.2.2 Network Architecture -- 2.2.2.1 The Base Stations -- 2.2.2.2 The Radio Network Controllers -- 2.2.2.3 The Mobile Switching Center -- 2.2.2.4 The SIM Card -- 2.2.2.5 The SMSC -- 2.2.2.6 Service Control Points -- 2.2.2.7 Billing -- 2.2.2.8 The Packet-Switched Core Network -- 2.2.2.9 The Serving GPRS Support Node -- 2.2.2.10 The Gateway GPRS Support Node -- 2.2.2.11 Interworking with GSM -- 2.2.3 Air Interface and Radio Network -- 2.2.3.1 The CDMA Principle -- 2.2.3.2 UMTS Channel Structure -- 2.2.3.3 Radio Resource Control States -- 2.2.3.4 Mobility Management in the Radio Network for Dedicated Connections -- 2.2.3.5 Radio Network Mobility Management in Idle, Cell-FACH, and Cell/URA-PCH State -- 2.2.3.6 Mobility Management in the Packet-Switched Core Network -- 2.2.4 HSPA (HSDPA and HSUPA) -- 2.2.4.1 Shared Channels -- 2.2.4.2 Multiple Spreading Codes -- 2.2.4.3 Higher Order Modulation -- 2.2.4.4 Scheduling, Modulation, and Coding, HARQ -- 2.2.4.5 Cell Updates and Handovers -- 2.2.4.6 HSUPA -- 2.2.5 HSPA+ and other Improvements: Competition for LTE -- 2.2.5.1 64QAM Modulation in the Downlink -- 2.2.5.2 Dual Carrier Operation in the Downlink -- 2.2.5.3 MIMO
  • 2.2.5.4 16QAM Modulation and Dual-Carrier Operation in the Uplink -- 2.2.5.5 Multicarrier and Multiband Operation -- 2.2.5.6 Continuous Packet Connectivity -- 2.2.5.7 Enhanced Cell-FACH, Cell/URA PCH States -- 2.2.5.8 Radio Network Enhancement: One-Tunnel -- 2.2.6 Competition for LTE in 5 MHz -- 2.3 LTE -- 2.3.1 Introduction -- 2.3.2 Network Architecture -- 2.3.2.1 Enhanced Base Stations -- 2.3.2.2 Core Network to Radio Access Network Interface -- 2.3.2.3 Gateway to the Internet -- 2.3.2.4 Interface to the User Database -- 2.3.2.5 Moving between Radio Technologies -- 2.3.2.6 The Packet Call becomes History -- 2.3.3 Air Interface and Radio Network -- 2.3.3.1 Downlink Data Transmission -- 2.3.3.2 Uplink Data Transmission -- 2.3.3.3 Physical Parameters -- 2.3.3.4 From Slots to Frames -- 2.3.3.5 Reference Symbols, Signals, and Channels -- 2.3.3.6 Downlink: Broadcast Channel -- 2.3.3.7 Downlink: Paging Channel -- 2.3.3.8 Downlink and Uplink: Dedicated Traffic and Control Channels and their Mapping to the Shared Channel -- 2.3.3.9 Downlink: Physical Layer Control Channels -- 2.3.3.10 Uplink: Physical Layer Control Channels -- 2.3.3.11 Dynamic and Persistent Scheduling Grants -- 2.3.3.12 MIMO Transmission -- 2.3.3.13 LTE Throughput Calculations -- 2.3.3.14 Radio Resource Control -- 2.3.3.15 RRC Connected State -- 2.3.3.16 RRC Idle State -- 2.3.3.17 Treatment of Data Packets in the eNodeB -- 2.3.4 Basic Procedures -- 2.3.4.1 Network Search and Broadcasting System Information -- 2.3.4.2 Initial Contact with the Network -- 2.3.4.3 Authentication -- 2.3.4.4 Requesting an IP Address -- 2.3.5 Summary and Comparison with HSPA -- 2.3.6 LTE-Advanced -- 2.3.6.1 Carrier Aggregation -- 2.3.6.2 MIMO Enhancements -- 2.3.6.3 CoMP-Coordinated Multi-Point Operation -- 2.3.6.4 Hetnets and eICIC -- 2.3.6.5 LTE-Advanced Summary -- 2.4 802.11 Wi-Fi
  • 2.4.1 Introduction -- 2.4.2 Network Architecture -- 2.4.2.1 The Wireless Network in a Box -- 2.4.2.2 Network Address Translation -- 2.4.2.3 Larger Wi-Fi Networks -- 2.4.3 The Air Interface-From 802.11b to 802.11n -- 2.4.3.1 802.11b-The Breakthrough -- 2.4.3.2 802.11g-The Mainstream -- 2.4.3.3 802.11a-The Forgotten Standard -- 2.4.3.4 802.11n-Breaking the Speed Barrier -- 2.4.4 Air Interface and Resource Management -- 2.4.4.1 Medium Access -- 2.4.4.2 Access Point Centric Operation -- 2.4.4.3 An Example Frame -- 2.4.4.4 Sleep Mode -- 2.4.5 Basic Procedures -- 2.4.6 Wi-Fi Security -- 2.4.6.1 Early Wi-Fi Security -- 2.4.6.2 Wi-Fi Security in Home Networks today -- 2.4.6.3 Security for Large Office Networks -- 2.4.6.4 Wi-Fi Security in Public Hotspots -- 2.4.7 Quality of Service: 802.11e -- 2.4.8 Gigabit Speeds with 802.11ac and 802.11ad -- 2.4.9 Summary -- Chapter 3 Network Capacity and Usage Scenarios -- 3.1 Usage in Developed Markets and Emerging Economies -- 3.2 How to Control Mobile Usage -- 3.2.1 Per Minute Charging -- 3.2.2 Volume Charging -- 3.2.3 Split Charging -- 3.2.4 Small Screen Flat Rates -- 3.2.5 Strategies to Inform Users when their Subscribed Data Volume is Used Up -- 3.2.6 Mobile Internet Access and Prepaid -- 3.3 Measuring Mobile Usage from a Financial Point of View -- 3.4 Cell Capacity in Downlink -- 3.5 Current and Future Frequency Bands for Cellular Wireless -- 3.6 Cell Capacity in Uplink -- 3.7 Per-User Throughput in Downlink -- 3.8 Per-User Throughput in Uplink -- 3.9 Traffic Estimation Per User -- 3.10 Overall Wireless Network Capacity -- 3.11 Network Capacity for Train Routes, Highways, and Remote Areas -- 3.12 When will GSM be Switched Off? -- 3.13 Cellular Network VoIP Capacity -- 3.14 Wi-Fi VoIP Capacity -- 3.15 Wi-Fi and Interference
  • 3.16 Wi-Fi Capacity in Combination with DSL, Cable, and Fiber -- 3.17 Backhaul for Wireless Networks -- 3.18 A Hybrid Cellular/Wi-Fi Network Today and in the Future -- Chapter 4 Voice over Wireless -- 4.1 Circuit-Switched Mobile Voice Telephony -- 4.1.1 Circuit Switching -- 4.1.2 A Voice-Optimized Radio Network -- 4.1.3 The Pros of Circuit Switching -- 4.1.4 The Bearer Independent Core Network Architecture -- 4.2 Packet-Switched Voice Telephony -- 4.2.1 Network and Applications are Separate in Packet-Switched Networks -- 4.2.2 Wireless Network Architecture for Transporting IP Packets -- 4.2.3 Benefits of Migrating Voice Telephony to IP -- 4.2.4 Voice Telephony Evolution and Service Integration -- 4.2.5 Voice Telephony over IP: The End of the Operator Monopoly -- 4.3 SIP Telephony over Fixed and Wireless Networks -- 4.3.1 SIP Registration -- 4.3.2 Establishing a SIP Call between Two SIP Subscribers -- 4.3.3 Session Description -- 4.3.4 The Real-Time Transfer Protocol -- 4.3.5 Establishing a SIP Call between a SIP and a PSTN Subscriber -- 4.3.6 Proprietary Components of a SIP System -- 4.3.7 Network Address Translation and SIP -- 4.4 Voice and Related Applications over IMS -- 4.4.1 IMS Basic Architecture -- 4.4.2 The P-CSCF -- 4.4.3 The S-CSCF and Application Servers -- 4.4.4 The I-CSCF and the HSS -- 4.4.5 Media Resource Functions -- 4.4.6 User Identities, Subscription Profiles, and Filter Criteria -- 4.4.7 IMS Registration Process -- 4.4.8 IMS Session Establishment -- 4.4.9 Voice Telephony Interworking with Circuit-Switched Networks -- 4.4.10 Push-to-Talk, Presence, and Instant Messaging -- 4.4.11 Voice Call Continuity, Dual Radio, and Single Radio Approaches -- 4.4.12 IMS with Wireless LAN Hotspots and Private Wi-Fi Networks -- 4.4.13 IMS and TISPAN -- 4.4.14 IMS on the Mobile Device
  • 4.4.14.1 Initial IMS Application Deployments -- 4.4.14.2 IMS as an API on Mobile Devices -- 4.4.15 Rich Communication Service (RCS-e) -- 4.4.16 Voice over LTE (VoLTE) -- 4.4.17 Challenges for IMS Rollouts -- 4.4.17.1 Circuit-Switched Voice and SMS -- 4.4.17.2 Network Capabilities -- 4.4.17.3 Solution Complexity -- 4.4.17.4 Network Interoperability -- 4.4.17.5 Mobile Device Capabilities -- 4.4.17.6 Mobile Device and Application Interoperability -- 4.4.17.7 Business Model -- 4.4.17.8 Service Development and Processes -- 4.4.18 Opportunities for IMS Rollouts -- 4.4.18.1 B3G Network Design -- 4.4.18.2 Fixed Line Network Evolution as Role Model and Complement -- 4.4.18.3 Preconfigured Services -- 4.4.18.4 National Telecom Infrastructure -- 4.4.18.5 Conclusion -- 4.5 Voice over DSL and Cable with Femtocells -- 4.5.1 Femtocells from the Network Operator's Point of View -- 4.5.2 Femtocells from the User's Point of View -- 4.5.3 Conclusion -- 4.6 Unlicensed Mobile Access and Generic Access Network -- 4.6.1 Technical Background -- 4.6.2 Advantages, Disadvantages, and Pricing Strategies -- 4.7 Network Operator Deployed Voice over IP Alternatives -- 4.7.1 CS Fallback -- 4.7.2 Voice over LTE via GAN -- 4.7.3 Dual-Radio Devices -- 4.8 Over-the-Top (OTT) Voice over IP Alternatives -- 4.9 Which Voice Technology will Reign in the Future? -- Chapter 5 Evolution of Mobile Devices and Operating Systems -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 The ARM Architecture -- 5.1.2 The x86 Architecture for Mobile Devices -- 5.1.3 Changing Worlds: Android on x86, Windows on ARM -- 5.1.4 From Hardware to Software -- 5.2 The System Architecture for Voice-Optimized Devices -- 5.3 The System Architecture for Multimedia Devices -- 5.4 Mobile Graphics Acceleration -- 5.4.1 2D Graphics -- 5.4.2 3D Graphics -- 5.5 Hardware Evolution -- 5.5.1 Chipset
  • 5.5.2 Process Shrinking
Control code
EBC1120838
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (412 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118341483
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2016. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Label
3G, 4G and Beyond : Bringing Networks, Devices and the Web Together, (electronic book)
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Evolution from 2G over 3G to 4G -- 1.1 First Half of the 1990s-Voice-Centric Communication -- 1.2 Between 1995 and 2000: The Rise of Mobility and the Internet -- 1.3 Between 2000 and 2005: Dot Com Burst, Web 2.0, Mobile Internet -- 1.4 Between 2005 and 2010: Global Coverage, Fixed Line VoIP, and Mobile Broadband -- 1.5 2010 and Beyond -- 1.6 All over IP in Mobile-The Biggest Challenge -- 1.7 Summary -- Chapter 2 Beyond 3G Network Architectures -- 2.1 Overview -- 2.2 UMTS, HSPA, and HSPA+ -- 2.2.1 Introduction -- 2.2.2 Network Architecture -- 2.2.2.1 The Base Stations -- 2.2.2.2 The Radio Network Controllers -- 2.2.2.3 The Mobile Switching Center -- 2.2.2.4 The SIM Card -- 2.2.2.5 The SMSC -- 2.2.2.6 Service Control Points -- 2.2.2.7 Billing -- 2.2.2.8 The Packet-Switched Core Network -- 2.2.2.9 The Serving GPRS Support Node -- 2.2.2.10 The Gateway GPRS Support Node -- 2.2.2.11 Interworking with GSM -- 2.2.3 Air Interface and Radio Network -- 2.2.3.1 The CDMA Principle -- 2.2.3.2 UMTS Channel Structure -- 2.2.3.3 Radio Resource Control States -- 2.2.3.4 Mobility Management in the Radio Network for Dedicated Connections -- 2.2.3.5 Radio Network Mobility Management in Idle, Cell-FACH, and Cell/URA-PCH State -- 2.2.3.6 Mobility Management in the Packet-Switched Core Network -- 2.2.4 HSPA (HSDPA and HSUPA) -- 2.2.4.1 Shared Channels -- 2.2.4.2 Multiple Spreading Codes -- 2.2.4.3 Higher Order Modulation -- 2.2.4.4 Scheduling, Modulation, and Coding, HARQ -- 2.2.4.5 Cell Updates and Handovers -- 2.2.4.6 HSUPA -- 2.2.5 HSPA+ and other Improvements: Competition for LTE -- 2.2.5.1 64QAM Modulation in the Downlink -- 2.2.5.2 Dual Carrier Operation in the Downlink -- 2.2.5.3 MIMO
  • 2.2.5.4 16QAM Modulation and Dual-Carrier Operation in the Uplink -- 2.2.5.5 Multicarrier and Multiband Operation -- 2.2.5.6 Continuous Packet Connectivity -- 2.2.5.7 Enhanced Cell-FACH, Cell/URA PCH States -- 2.2.5.8 Radio Network Enhancement: One-Tunnel -- 2.2.6 Competition for LTE in 5 MHz -- 2.3 LTE -- 2.3.1 Introduction -- 2.3.2 Network Architecture -- 2.3.2.1 Enhanced Base Stations -- 2.3.2.2 Core Network to Radio Access Network Interface -- 2.3.2.3 Gateway to the Internet -- 2.3.2.4 Interface to the User Database -- 2.3.2.5 Moving between Radio Technologies -- 2.3.2.6 The Packet Call becomes History -- 2.3.3 Air Interface and Radio Network -- 2.3.3.1 Downlink Data Transmission -- 2.3.3.2 Uplink Data Transmission -- 2.3.3.3 Physical Parameters -- 2.3.3.4 From Slots to Frames -- 2.3.3.5 Reference Symbols, Signals, and Channels -- 2.3.3.6 Downlink: Broadcast Channel -- 2.3.3.7 Downlink: Paging Channel -- 2.3.3.8 Downlink and Uplink: Dedicated Traffic and Control Channels and their Mapping to the Shared Channel -- 2.3.3.9 Downlink: Physical Layer Control Channels -- 2.3.3.10 Uplink: Physical Layer Control Channels -- 2.3.3.11 Dynamic and Persistent Scheduling Grants -- 2.3.3.12 MIMO Transmission -- 2.3.3.13 LTE Throughput Calculations -- 2.3.3.14 Radio Resource Control -- 2.3.3.15 RRC Connected State -- 2.3.3.16 RRC Idle State -- 2.3.3.17 Treatment of Data Packets in the eNodeB -- 2.3.4 Basic Procedures -- 2.3.4.1 Network Search and Broadcasting System Information -- 2.3.4.2 Initial Contact with the Network -- 2.3.4.3 Authentication -- 2.3.4.4 Requesting an IP Address -- 2.3.5 Summary and Comparison with HSPA -- 2.3.6 LTE-Advanced -- 2.3.6.1 Carrier Aggregation -- 2.3.6.2 MIMO Enhancements -- 2.3.6.3 CoMP-Coordinated Multi-Point Operation -- 2.3.6.4 Hetnets and eICIC -- 2.3.6.5 LTE-Advanced Summary -- 2.4 802.11 Wi-Fi
  • 2.4.1 Introduction -- 2.4.2 Network Architecture -- 2.4.2.1 The Wireless Network in a Box -- 2.4.2.2 Network Address Translation -- 2.4.2.3 Larger Wi-Fi Networks -- 2.4.3 The Air Interface-From 802.11b to 802.11n -- 2.4.3.1 802.11b-The Breakthrough -- 2.4.3.2 802.11g-The Mainstream -- 2.4.3.3 802.11a-The Forgotten Standard -- 2.4.3.4 802.11n-Breaking the Speed Barrier -- 2.4.4 Air Interface and Resource Management -- 2.4.4.1 Medium Access -- 2.4.4.2 Access Point Centric Operation -- 2.4.4.3 An Example Frame -- 2.4.4.4 Sleep Mode -- 2.4.5 Basic Procedures -- 2.4.6 Wi-Fi Security -- 2.4.6.1 Early Wi-Fi Security -- 2.4.6.2 Wi-Fi Security in Home Networks today -- 2.4.6.3 Security for Large Office Networks -- 2.4.6.4 Wi-Fi Security in Public Hotspots -- 2.4.7 Quality of Service: 802.11e -- 2.4.8 Gigabit Speeds with 802.11ac and 802.11ad -- 2.4.9 Summary -- Chapter 3 Network Capacity and Usage Scenarios -- 3.1 Usage in Developed Markets and Emerging Economies -- 3.2 How to Control Mobile Usage -- 3.2.1 Per Minute Charging -- 3.2.2 Volume Charging -- 3.2.3 Split Charging -- 3.2.4 Small Screen Flat Rates -- 3.2.5 Strategies to Inform Users when their Subscribed Data Volume is Used Up -- 3.2.6 Mobile Internet Access and Prepaid -- 3.3 Measuring Mobile Usage from a Financial Point of View -- 3.4 Cell Capacity in Downlink -- 3.5 Current and Future Frequency Bands for Cellular Wireless -- 3.6 Cell Capacity in Uplink -- 3.7 Per-User Throughput in Downlink -- 3.8 Per-User Throughput in Uplink -- 3.9 Traffic Estimation Per User -- 3.10 Overall Wireless Network Capacity -- 3.11 Network Capacity for Train Routes, Highways, and Remote Areas -- 3.12 When will GSM be Switched Off? -- 3.13 Cellular Network VoIP Capacity -- 3.14 Wi-Fi VoIP Capacity -- 3.15 Wi-Fi and Interference
  • 3.16 Wi-Fi Capacity in Combination with DSL, Cable, and Fiber -- 3.17 Backhaul for Wireless Networks -- 3.18 A Hybrid Cellular/Wi-Fi Network Today and in the Future -- Chapter 4 Voice over Wireless -- 4.1 Circuit-Switched Mobile Voice Telephony -- 4.1.1 Circuit Switching -- 4.1.2 A Voice-Optimized Radio Network -- 4.1.3 The Pros of Circuit Switching -- 4.1.4 The Bearer Independent Core Network Architecture -- 4.2 Packet-Switched Voice Telephony -- 4.2.1 Network and Applications are Separate in Packet-Switched Networks -- 4.2.2 Wireless Network Architecture for Transporting IP Packets -- 4.2.3 Benefits of Migrating Voice Telephony to IP -- 4.2.4 Voice Telephony Evolution and Service Integration -- 4.2.5 Voice Telephony over IP: The End of the Operator Monopoly -- 4.3 SIP Telephony over Fixed and Wireless Networks -- 4.3.1 SIP Registration -- 4.3.2 Establishing a SIP Call between Two SIP Subscribers -- 4.3.3 Session Description -- 4.3.4 The Real-Time Transfer Protocol -- 4.3.5 Establishing a SIP Call between a SIP and a PSTN Subscriber -- 4.3.6 Proprietary Components of a SIP System -- 4.3.7 Network Address Translation and SIP -- 4.4 Voice and Related Applications over IMS -- 4.4.1 IMS Basic Architecture -- 4.4.2 The P-CSCF -- 4.4.3 The S-CSCF and Application Servers -- 4.4.4 The I-CSCF and the HSS -- 4.4.5 Media Resource Functions -- 4.4.6 User Identities, Subscription Profiles, and Filter Criteria -- 4.4.7 IMS Registration Process -- 4.4.8 IMS Session Establishment -- 4.4.9 Voice Telephony Interworking with Circuit-Switched Networks -- 4.4.10 Push-to-Talk, Presence, and Instant Messaging -- 4.4.11 Voice Call Continuity, Dual Radio, and Single Radio Approaches -- 4.4.12 IMS with Wireless LAN Hotspots and Private Wi-Fi Networks -- 4.4.13 IMS and TISPAN -- 4.4.14 IMS on the Mobile Device
  • 4.4.14.1 Initial IMS Application Deployments -- 4.4.14.2 IMS as an API on Mobile Devices -- 4.4.15 Rich Communication Service (RCS-e) -- 4.4.16 Voice over LTE (VoLTE) -- 4.4.17 Challenges for IMS Rollouts -- 4.4.17.1 Circuit-Switched Voice and SMS -- 4.4.17.2 Network Capabilities -- 4.4.17.3 Solution Complexity -- 4.4.17.4 Network Interoperability -- 4.4.17.5 Mobile Device Capabilities -- 4.4.17.6 Mobile Device and Application Interoperability -- 4.4.17.7 Business Model -- 4.4.17.8 Service Development and Processes -- 4.4.18 Opportunities for IMS Rollouts -- 4.4.18.1 B3G Network Design -- 4.4.18.2 Fixed Line Network Evolution as Role Model and Complement -- 4.4.18.3 Preconfigured Services -- 4.4.18.4 National Telecom Infrastructure -- 4.4.18.5 Conclusion -- 4.5 Voice over DSL and Cable with Femtocells -- 4.5.1 Femtocells from the Network Operator's Point of View -- 4.5.2 Femtocells from the User's Point of View -- 4.5.3 Conclusion -- 4.6 Unlicensed Mobile Access and Generic Access Network -- 4.6.1 Technical Background -- 4.6.2 Advantages, Disadvantages, and Pricing Strategies -- 4.7 Network Operator Deployed Voice over IP Alternatives -- 4.7.1 CS Fallback -- 4.7.2 Voice over LTE via GAN -- 4.7.3 Dual-Radio Devices -- 4.8 Over-the-Top (OTT) Voice over IP Alternatives -- 4.9 Which Voice Technology will Reign in the Future? -- Chapter 5 Evolution of Mobile Devices and Operating Systems -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.1.1 The ARM Architecture -- 5.1.2 The x86 Architecture for Mobile Devices -- 5.1.3 Changing Worlds: Android on x86, Windows on ARM -- 5.1.4 From Hardware to Software -- 5.2 The System Architecture for Voice-Optimized Devices -- 5.3 The System Architecture for Multimedia Devices -- 5.4 Mobile Graphics Acceleration -- 5.4.1 2D Graphics -- 5.4.2 3D Graphics -- 5.5 Hardware Evolution -- 5.5.1 Chipset
  • 5.5.2 Process Shrinking
Control code
EBC1120838
Dimensions
unknown
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
1 online resource (412 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118341483
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Note
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2016. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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