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The Resource Advanced focus group research, Edward F. Fern

Advanced focus group research, Edward F. Fern

Label
Advanced focus group research
Title
Advanced focus group research
Statement of responsibility
Edward F. Fern
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fern, Edward F
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Focused group interviewing
  • Social sciences
Label
Advanced focus group research, Edward F. Fern
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-244) and index
Contents
  • Preface
  • 1.
  • Introduction and Conceptual Framework.
  • p. 1
  • Goals of the Book.
  • p. 2
  • Caveat About the Generality of Findings.
  • p. 2
  • Different Focus Group Designs for Different Research Tasks.
  • p. 3
  • Focus Group Uses.
  • p. 3
  • Theory Applications Versus Effects Applications.
  • p. 4
  • Exploratory Focus Group Tasks.
  • p. 5
  • Experiential Focus Group Tasks.
  • p. 7
  • Clinical Focus Groups Tasks.
  • p. 9
  • Scientific Knowledge and Focus Groups.
  • p. 10
  • Conceptual Framework.
  • p. 11
  • Components of the conceptual Framework.
  • p. 13
  • Summary.
  • p. 22
  • 2.
  • Group Composition, Individual Characteristics, and Cohesion.
  • p. 23
  • Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 24
  • Social Status.
  • p. 30
  • Age.
  • p. 32
  • Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 33
  • Gender.
  • p. 35
  • Cultural Value Orientation and Personality Differences.
  • p. 41
  • Big Five Factor Definitions.
  • p. 42
  • Personality Traits and Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 42
  • Complexity and Interactions Between Individual Characteristics.
  • p. 47
  • Summary.
  • p. 47
  • 3.
  • Research Setting.
  • p. 49
  • Privacy.
  • p. 51
  • Factors Related to Personal Space.
  • p. 52
  • Setting and Environmental Factors.
  • p. 61
  • Compensation Mechanisms.
  • p. 64
  • Artificial Settings and Environments.
  • p. 68
  • Computer-Aided Groups Compared With Face-to-Face Groups.
  • p. 70
  • Summary.
  • p. 71
  • 4.
  • Focus Group Moderator.
  • p. 73
  • Desirable Background Characteristics of Moderators.
  • p. 75
  • Deciding Whether to Use Focus Group Moderators.
  • p. 78
  • Moderating Style.
  • p. 80
  • How Directive Should Moderators Be?.
  • p. 85
  • Moderating Groups of Racial/Ethnic Minorities.
  • p. 87
  • Moderating Styles for Different Research Purposes.
  • p. 91
  • Qualitative Analysis of Focus Group Data.
  • p. 92
  • Quantitative Summaries of Qualitative Sessions.
  • p. 93
  • Sources of Moderator Bias.
  • p. 94
  • Summary.
  • p. 95
  • 5.
  • Factors That Affect the Focus Group Discussion Process.
  • p. 97
  • Focus Group Discussion Process.
  • p. 97
  • Self-Disclosure.
  • p. 101
  • Disclosure Reciprocity and Liking.
  • p. 102
  • Production Blocking.
  • p. 103
  • Social Influence.
  • p. 106
  • Free Riding.
  • p. 110
  • Influence of Information.
  • p. 112
  • Persuasive Arguments and Attitude Polarization.
  • p. 112
  • Information Sharing.
  • p. 114
  • Summary.
  • p. 118
  • 6.
  • Methodological Issues in Focus Group Research: Representativeness, Independence, Degrees of Freedom, and Theory Confirmation.
  • p. 121
  • Representative Samples.
  • p. 122
  • Generalizability of Focus Group Findings.
  • p. 124
  • Asking Questions and the Moderator's Guide.
  • p. 129
  • Independence, Degrees of Freedom, and the Unit of Analysis.
  • p. 131
  • Quantitative Data From Focus Groups.
  • p. 138
  • Interpretation of Focus Group Output.
  • p. 140
  • Scientific Status of Focus Groups.
  • p. 140
  • Summary.
  • p. 147
  • 7.
  • Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 149
  • Types of Information From Focus Groups.
  • p. 150
  • Focus Groups for Exploratory Effects Applications.
  • p. 152
  • Focus Groups for Exploratory Theory Applications.
  • p. 153
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 155
  • Group Composition for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 160
  • Group Size and the Number of Groups.
  • p. 161
  • Focus Group Setting for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 164
  • Computer-Mediated Groups for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 165
  • Group Moderator for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 166
  • Group Process Factors and Brainstorming Tasks.
  • p. 168
  • Generalizability.
  • p. 169
  • Summary.
  • p. 170
  • 8.
  • Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 173
  • Types of Experiential Information.
  • p. 174
  • Focus Groups for Experiential Effect Applications.
  • p. 174
  • Focus Groups for Experiential Theory Applications.
  • p. 176
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 180
  • Group Composition for Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 182
  • Research Setting for Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 183
  • Group Process Influences on Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 185
  • Group Moderator in Experiential Research.
  • p. 186
  • Generalizability.
  • p. 189
  • Summary.
  • p. 189
  • 9.
  • Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 193
  • Clinical Process.
  • p. 194
  • Focus Groups for Clinical Effect Applications.
  • p. 198
  • Focus Groups for Clinical Theory Applications.
  • p. 199
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 199
  • Group Size and the Number of Groups.
  • p. 205
  • Research Setting for Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 205
  • Group Moderator for Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 206
  • Group Process Influences on Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 210
  • Summary.
  • p. 212
  • 10.
  • Planning and Reporting Future Focus Group Research.
  • p. 215
  • Conceptual Framework for Planning Research on Focus Groups.
  • p. 216
  • Research Agenda for Focus Groups.
  • p. 223
  • Reporting Focus Group Research Results.
  • p. 225
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 230
  • References.
  • p. 233
  • Index.
  • p. 245
  • About the Author.
  • p. 254
Control code
020000956727
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
x, 254 p.
Isbn
9780761912491
Lccn
lc00012632
Other physical details
ill.
Label
Advanced focus group research, Edward F. Fern
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-244) and index
Contents
  • Preface
  • 1.
  • Introduction and Conceptual Framework.
  • p. 1
  • Goals of the Book.
  • p. 2
  • Caveat About the Generality of Findings.
  • p. 2
  • Different Focus Group Designs for Different Research Tasks.
  • p. 3
  • Focus Group Uses.
  • p. 3
  • Theory Applications Versus Effects Applications.
  • p. 4
  • Exploratory Focus Group Tasks.
  • p. 5
  • Experiential Focus Group Tasks.
  • p. 7
  • Clinical Focus Groups Tasks.
  • p. 9
  • Scientific Knowledge and Focus Groups.
  • p. 10
  • Conceptual Framework.
  • p. 11
  • Components of the conceptual Framework.
  • p. 13
  • Summary.
  • p. 22
  • 2.
  • Group Composition, Individual Characteristics, and Cohesion.
  • p. 23
  • Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 24
  • Social Status.
  • p. 30
  • Age.
  • p. 32
  • Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 33
  • Gender.
  • p. 35
  • Cultural Value Orientation and Personality Differences.
  • p. 41
  • Big Five Factor Definitions.
  • p. 42
  • Personality Traits and Cultural Value Orientation.
  • p. 42
  • Complexity and Interactions Between Individual Characteristics.
  • p. 47
  • Summary.
  • p. 47
  • 3.
  • Research Setting.
  • p. 49
  • Privacy.
  • p. 51
  • Factors Related to Personal Space.
  • p. 52
  • Setting and Environmental Factors.
  • p. 61
  • Compensation Mechanisms.
  • p. 64
  • Artificial Settings and Environments.
  • p. 68
  • Computer-Aided Groups Compared With Face-to-Face Groups.
  • p. 70
  • Summary.
  • p. 71
  • 4.
  • Focus Group Moderator.
  • p. 73
  • Desirable Background Characteristics of Moderators.
  • p. 75
  • Deciding Whether to Use Focus Group Moderators.
  • p. 78
  • Moderating Style.
  • p. 80
  • How Directive Should Moderators Be?.
  • p. 85
  • Moderating Groups of Racial/Ethnic Minorities.
  • p. 87
  • Moderating Styles for Different Research Purposes.
  • p. 91
  • Qualitative Analysis of Focus Group Data.
  • p. 92
  • Quantitative Summaries of Qualitative Sessions.
  • p. 93
  • Sources of Moderator Bias.
  • p. 94
  • Summary.
  • p. 95
  • 5.
  • Factors That Affect the Focus Group Discussion Process.
  • p. 97
  • Focus Group Discussion Process.
  • p. 97
  • Self-Disclosure.
  • p. 101
  • Disclosure Reciprocity and Liking.
  • p. 102
  • Production Blocking.
  • p. 103
  • Social Influence.
  • p. 106
  • Free Riding.
  • p. 110
  • Influence of Information.
  • p. 112
  • Persuasive Arguments and Attitude Polarization.
  • p. 112
  • Information Sharing.
  • p. 114
  • Summary.
  • p. 118
  • 6.
  • Methodological Issues in Focus Group Research: Representativeness, Independence, Degrees of Freedom, and Theory Confirmation.
  • p. 121
  • Representative Samples.
  • p. 122
  • Generalizability of Focus Group Findings.
  • p. 124
  • Asking Questions and the Moderator's Guide.
  • p. 129
  • Independence, Degrees of Freedom, and the Unit of Analysis.
  • p. 131
  • Quantitative Data From Focus Groups.
  • p. 138
  • Interpretation of Focus Group Output.
  • p. 140
  • Scientific Status of Focus Groups.
  • p. 140
  • Summary.
  • p. 147
  • 7.
  • Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 149
  • Types of Information From Focus Groups.
  • p. 150
  • Focus Groups for Exploratory Effects Applications.
  • p. 152
  • Focus Groups for Exploratory Theory Applications.
  • p. 153
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 155
  • Group Composition for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 160
  • Group Size and the Number of Groups.
  • p. 161
  • Focus Group Setting for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 164
  • Computer-Mediated Groups for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 165
  • Group Moderator for Exploratory Tasks.
  • p. 166
  • Group Process Factors and Brainstorming Tasks.
  • p. 168
  • Generalizability.
  • p. 169
  • Summary.
  • p. 170
  • 8.
  • Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 173
  • Types of Experiential Information.
  • p. 174
  • Focus Groups for Experiential Effect Applications.
  • p. 174
  • Focus Groups for Experiential Theory Applications.
  • p. 176
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 180
  • Group Composition for Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 182
  • Research Setting for Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 183
  • Group Process Influences on Experiential Tasks.
  • p. 185
  • Group Moderator in Experiential Research.
  • p. 186
  • Generalizability.
  • p. 189
  • Summary.
  • p. 189
  • 9.
  • Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 193
  • Clinical Process.
  • p. 194
  • Focus Groups for Clinical Effect Applications.
  • p. 198
  • Focus Groups for Clinical Theory Applications.
  • p. 199
  • Group Composition.
  • p. 199
  • Group Size and the Number of Groups.
  • p. 205
  • Research Setting for Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 205
  • Group Moderator for Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 206
  • Group Process Influences on Clinical Tasks.
  • p. 210
  • Summary.
  • p. 212
  • 10.
  • Planning and Reporting Future Focus Group Research.
  • p. 215
  • Conceptual Framework for Planning Research on Focus Groups.
  • p. 216
  • Research Agenda for Focus Groups.
  • p. 223
  • Reporting Focus Group Research Results.
  • p. 225
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 230
  • References.
  • p. 233
  • Index.
  • p. 245
  • About the Author.
  • p. 254
Control code
020000956727
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
x, 254 p.
Isbn
9780761912491
Lccn
lc00012632
Other physical details
ill.

Library Locations

    • Sydney Jones LibraryBorrow it
      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
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