Coverart for item
The Resource An introduction to language and society, Martin Montgomery

An introduction to language and society, Martin Montgomery

Label
An introduction to language and society
Title
An introduction to language and society
Statement of responsibility
Martin Montgomery
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"In this new edition of a classic textbook, Martin Montgomery explores some of the close connections between language and social life. He explores the ways in which children learn language in interaction with those around them, learning at the same time through language how to make sense of their world. He considers the social implications of accent and dialect as well as the broader interconnections of language with social class, ethnic group and subculture. He explores the role of language in shaping social relationships as part of everyday encounters and looks at the ways in which our habitual ways of interpreting the world may be shaped by the categories, systems and patterns of our language."--BOOK JACKET
Cataloging source
UkLiU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Montgomery, Martin
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Series statement
Studies in culture and communication
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Language acquisition
Label
An introduction to language and society, Martin Montgomery
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Previous edition published in 1995
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • Background sources and further rending.
  • p. 8
  • Pt. 1.
  • Development of Language.
  • p. 11
  • 1.
  • beginnings of language development.
  • p. 13
  • Learning language: the first words.
  • p. 13
  • Some precursors of language development.
  • p. 15
  • early communicative expressions as a protolanguage.
  • p. 18
  • From protolanguage to holophrases.
  • p. 22
  • Two-word utterances as the beginnings of syntax.
  • p. 24
  • Basic meaning relations during the two-word phase.
  • p. 27
  • problem of method.
  • p. 30
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 33
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 35
  • 2.
  • Dialogue and language development.
  • p. 41
  • Further developments in meaning.
  • p. 41
  • child's strategies for dialogue: establishing shared attention.
  • p. 46
  • Further dialogic strategies: responses.
  • p. 47
  • Ideational and interpersonal developments are closely interdependent.
  • p. 49
  • Dialogue as an arena for language development.
  • p. 51
  • Theoretical paradigms of language development.
  • p. 62
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 66
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 67
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 68
  • Pt. 2.
  • Linguistic Diversity and the Speech Community.
  • p. 71
  • 3.
  • Language and regional variation: accent and dialect.
  • p. 73
  • Regional variation, within a speech community.
  • p. 73
  • Regional variation and social structure.
  • p. 74
  • social stratification of pronunciation.
  • p. 75
  • Shifts in pronunciation according to situation.
  • p. 76
  • Attitudes to pronunciation within the speech community.
  • p. 76
  • Working-class loyalty to non-prestige forms.
  • p. 77
  • 'Hypercorrection' in the lower middle class.
  • p. 78
  • How do some patterns of pronunciation become the prestige forms?.
  • p. 78
  • Accents as a residue of earlier dialect differences.
  • p. 79
  • Factors underlying the survival of accents.
  • p. 80
  • Accent evaluation.
  • p. 82
  • Accents in television advertisements.
  • p. 83
  • Changing attitudes to accents.
  • p. 83
  • Surviving dialect differences.
  • p. 85
  • Dialect levelling and 'Estuary English'.
  • p. 87
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 89
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 91
  • 4.
  • Language and ethnicity.
  • p. 95
  • Language variation and ethnicity.
  • p. 95
  • Linguistic markers of African-Caribbean identity.
  • p. 97
  • Origins and emergence of Caribbean Creole.
  • p. 98
  • Some linguistic differences between Jamaican Creole and Standard English.
  • p. 99
  • Social situation and the use of Creole.
  • p. 100
  • Asymmetrical selection of Creole forms within the African-Caribbean community.
  • p. 101
  • continuance of Creole.
  • p. 103
  • Emphasising ethnicity in speech.
  • p. 104
  • Youth, subcultures and 'crossing' ethnicity.
  • p. 105
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 106
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 108
  • 5.
  • Language and subcultures: anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Linguistic features of an anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Rapping and anti-language.
  • p. 115
  • Anti-language and social structure.
  • p. 117
  • Anti-language and the speech community.
  • p. 119
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 119
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 120
  • 6.
  • Language and situation: register.
  • p. 123
  • Language is sensitive to its context of situation.
  • p. 123
  • Register.
  • p. 125
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 148
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 148
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 151
  • 7.
  • Language and social class: restricted and elaborated speech variants.
  • p. 159
  • Language and social class.
  • p. 159
  • Restricted and elaborated speech variants.
  • p. 160
  • Two kinds of social formation.
  • p. 164
  • Role systems and codes.
  • p. 165
  • Codes and social class.
  • p. 166
  • Reactions.
  • p. 168
  • alternative hypothesis.
  • p. 169
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 169
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 171
  • 8.
  • Language and gender.
  • p. 173
  • Introduction.
  • p. 173
  • 'Gender' versus 'sex'.
  • p. 173
  • Do men and women talk differently? The claims and the evidence.
  • p. 177
  • Conclusions: difference and dominance.
  • p. 192
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 198
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 199
  • 9.
  • Linguistic diversity and the speech community: conclusion.
  • p. 201
  • speech community.
  • p. 201
  • Diversity in language.
  • p. 202
  • relationship of the standard dialect to other varieties.
  • p. 203
  • Communicative styles, subcultures, and the speech community.
  • p. 204
  • Conclusions: language and community.
  • p. 210
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 213
  • Pt. 3.
  • Language and Social Interaction.
  • p. 215
  • 10.
  • Language and social interaction.
  • p. 217
  • Doing things with words: utterances perform actions.
  • p. 218
  • normal coherence of talk: the actions performed by utterances typically cohere, one with another.
  • p. 219
  • Formats for providing coherence: the two-part structure or 'adjacency pair'.
  • p. 220
  • How do we recognize what an utterance is doing: in particular, what counts as a question?.
  • p. 221
  • Doing things with words: managing the discourse.
  • p. 231
  • Social relations and the management of discourse.
  • p. 235
  • Social relations, language, and culture.
  • p. 236
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 241
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 242
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 245
  • Pt. 4.
  • Language and Representation.
  • p. 247
  • 11.
  • Language and representation.
  • p. 249
  • Language and representation.
  • p. 249
  • Two conflicting positions: the 'universalist' versus the 'relativist'.
  • p. 250
  • Vocabulary differences between languages.
  • p. 251
  • Grammatical differences between languages.
  • p. 252
  • Difficulties in the relativist position.
  • p. 253
  • 'interested' character it linguistic representation.
  • p. 254
  • vocabulary of modern warfare.
  • p. 257
  • After 9/11.
  • p. 262
  • Sentences and representation.
  • p. 266
  • Transitivity and the depiction of civil disorder.
  • p. 269
  • Industrial disputes and civil disorder: the miners' strike (1984-5) and the Paris riots (2007).
  • p. 271
  • Language in the news: violent men and crimes against women.
  • p. 277
  • Conclusions.
  • p. 280
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 283
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 286
  • References.
  • p. 289
  • Index.
  • p. 305
Control code
ocn189699863
Dimensions
21 cm.
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
xx, 314 p.
Isbn
9780415382991
Lccn
2008000250
Other physical details
ill.
Label
An introduction to language and society, Martin Montgomery
Publication
Note
Previous edition published in 1995
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • Background sources and further rending.
  • p. 8
  • Pt. 1.
  • Development of Language.
  • p. 11
  • 1.
  • beginnings of language development.
  • p. 13
  • Learning language: the first words.
  • p. 13
  • Some precursors of language development.
  • p. 15
  • early communicative expressions as a protolanguage.
  • p. 18
  • From protolanguage to holophrases.
  • p. 22
  • Two-word utterances as the beginnings of syntax.
  • p. 24
  • Basic meaning relations during the two-word phase.
  • p. 27
  • problem of method.
  • p. 30
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 33
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 35
  • 2.
  • Dialogue and language development.
  • p. 41
  • Further developments in meaning.
  • p. 41
  • child's strategies for dialogue: establishing shared attention.
  • p. 46
  • Further dialogic strategies: responses.
  • p. 47
  • Ideational and interpersonal developments are closely interdependent.
  • p. 49
  • Dialogue as an arena for language development.
  • p. 51
  • Theoretical paradigms of language development.
  • p. 62
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 66
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 67
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 68
  • Pt. 2.
  • Linguistic Diversity and the Speech Community.
  • p. 71
  • 3.
  • Language and regional variation: accent and dialect.
  • p. 73
  • Regional variation, within a speech community.
  • p. 73
  • Regional variation and social structure.
  • p. 74
  • social stratification of pronunciation.
  • p. 75
  • Shifts in pronunciation according to situation.
  • p. 76
  • Attitudes to pronunciation within the speech community.
  • p. 76
  • Working-class loyalty to non-prestige forms.
  • p. 77
  • 'Hypercorrection' in the lower middle class.
  • p. 78
  • How do some patterns of pronunciation become the prestige forms?.
  • p. 78
  • Accents as a residue of earlier dialect differences.
  • p. 79
  • Factors underlying the survival of accents.
  • p. 80
  • Accent evaluation.
  • p. 82
  • Accents in television advertisements.
  • p. 83
  • Changing attitudes to accents.
  • p. 83
  • Surviving dialect differences.
  • p. 85
  • Dialect levelling and 'Estuary English'.
  • p. 87
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 89
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 91
  • 4.
  • Language and ethnicity.
  • p. 95
  • Language variation and ethnicity.
  • p. 95
  • Linguistic markers of African-Caribbean identity.
  • p. 97
  • Origins and emergence of Caribbean Creole.
  • p. 98
  • Some linguistic differences between Jamaican Creole and Standard English.
  • p. 99
  • Social situation and the use of Creole.
  • p. 100
  • Asymmetrical selection of Creole forms within the African-Caribbean community.
  • p. 101
  • continuance of Creole.
  • p. 103
  • Emphasising ethnicity in speech.
  • p. 104
  • Youth, subcultures and 'crossing' ethnicity.
  • p. 105
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 106
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 108
  • 5.
  • Language and subcultures: anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Linguistic features of an anti-language.
  • p. 113
  • Rapping and anti-language.
  • p. 115
  • Anti-language and social structure.
  • p. 117
  • Anti-language and the speech community.
  • p. 119
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 119
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 120
  • 6.
  • Language and situation: register.
  • p. 123
  • Language is sensitive to its context of situation.
  • p. 123
  • Register.
  • p. 125
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 148
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 148
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 151
  • 7.
  • Language and social class: restricted and elaborated speech variants.
  • p. 159
  • Language and social class.
  • p. 159
  • Restricted and elaborated speech variants.
  • p. 160
  • Two kinds of social formation.
  • p. 164
  • Role systems and codes.
  • p. 165
  • Codes and social class.
  • p. 166
  • Reactions.
  • p. 168
  • alternative hypothesis.
  • p. 169
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 169
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 171
  • 8.
  • Language and gender.
  • p. 173
  • Introduction.
  • p. 173
  • 'Gender' versus 'sex'.
  • p. 173
  • Do men and women talk differently? The claims and the evidence.
  • p. 177
  • Conclusions: difference and dominance.
  • p. 192
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 198
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 199
  • 9.
  • Linguistic diversity and the speech community: conclusion.
  • p. 201
  • speech community.
  • p. 201
  • Diversity in language.
  • p. 202
  • relationship of the standard dialect to other varieties.
  • p. 203
  • Communicative styles, subcultures, and the speech community.
  • p. 204
  • Conclusions: language and community.
  • p. 210
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 213
  • Pt. 3.
  • Language and Social Interaction.
  • p. 215
  • 10.
  • Language and social interaction.
  • p. 217
  • Doing things with words: utterances perform actions.
  • p. 218
  • normal coherence of talk: the actions performed by utterances typically cohere, one with another.
  • p. 219
  • Formats for providing coherence: the two-part structure or 'adjacency pair'.
  • p. 220
  • How do we recognize what an utterance is doing: in particular, what counts as a question?.
  • p. 221
  • Doing things with words: managing the discourse.
  • p. 231
  • Social relations and the management of discourse.
  • p. 235
  • Social relations, language, and culture.
  • p. 236
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 241
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 242
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 245
  • Pt. 4.
  • Language and Representation.
  • p. 247
  • 11.
  • Language and representation.
  • p. 249
  • Language and representation.
  • p. 249
  • Two conflicting positions: the 'universalist' versus the 'relativist'.
  • p. 250
  • Vocabulary differences between languages.
  • p. 251
  • Grammatical differences between languages.
  • p. 252
  • Difficulties in the relativist position.
  • p. 253
  • 'interested' character it linguistic representation.
  • p. 254
  • vocabulary of modern warfare.
  • p. 257
  • After 9/11.
  • p. 262
  • Sentences and representation.
  • p. 266
  • Transitivity and the depiction of civil disorder.
  • p. 269
  • Industrial disputes and civil disorder: the miners' strike (1984-5) and the Paris riots (2007).
  • p. 271
  • Language in the news: violent men and crimes against women.
  • p. 277
  • Conclusions.
  • p. 280
  • Background sources and further reading.
  • p. 283
  • Follow-up activities.
  • p. 286
  • References.
  • p. 289
  • Index.
  • p. 305
Control code
ocn189699863
Dimensions
21 cm.
Edition
3rd ed.
Extent
xx, 314 p.
Isbn
9780415382991
Lccn
2008000250
Other physical details
ill.

Library Locations

    • Sydney Jones LibraryBorrow it
      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
Processing Feedback ...