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The Resource Children's language : consensus and controversy, Ray Cattell

Children's language : consensus and controversy, Ray Cattell

Label
Children's language : consensus and controversy
Title
Children's language
Title remainder
consensus and controversy
Statement of responsibility
Ray Cattell
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This revised edition of Ray Cattell's bestselling textbook aims to give readers the background necessary to form their own views on the debate as to how children really learn language
Cataloging source
UKM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cattell, N. R
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Children
  • Language acquisition
Label
Children's language : consensus and controversy, Ray Cattell
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Previous ed.: 2000
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-271) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.4.
  • 6.4.
  • Enough scrapes of grammar to keep you alive
  • 6.4.1.
  • Word classes
  • 6.4.2.
  • Nouns and verbs: getting to know them
  • 6.4.3.
  • Phrase structure
  • 6.5.
  • One way of deducing something about the mind
  • Babbling
  • 6.6.
  • Parameters
  • 7.
  • Do we help children to speak?
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Ferguson on baby-talk
  • 7.2.1.
  • Simplifying processes
  • 1.5.
  • 7.2.2.
  • Clarifying processes
  • 7.2.3.
  • Expressive processes
  • 7.2.4.
  • Discussion
  • 7.3.
  • early work of Catherine Snow
  • 7.4.
  • work of Newport and colleagues
  • first words
  • 7.5.
  • Wexler and Culicover
  • 7.6.
  • Discovery procedures
  • 7.7.
  • Snow drift
  • 7.8.
  • Doggerel
  • 7.9.
  • work of Anne Fernald
  • 1.6.
  • 8.
  • Learning how to mean
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Learning how to mean
  • 8.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.2.
  • What 'mean' means
  • Two-word utterances
  • 8.2.3.
  • child as active participant
  • 8.3.
  • Protolanguage (phase 1)
  • 8.4.
  • transition (phase 2)
  • 8.5.
  • adult language (phase 3)
  • 8.6.
  • Conclusion
  • 2.
  • 8.6.1.
  • scope of Halliday's work
  • 8.6.2.
  • Separate planets
  • 9.
  • two hemispheres of the brain -- A
  • 9.1.
  • physical brain
  • 9.2.
  • origins of knowledge about aphasia
  • Catching fire
  • 9.2.1.
  • Marc Dax
  • 9.2.2.
  • Paul Broca
  • 9.2.3.
  • Karl Wernicke
  • 9.2.4.
  • Handedness
  • 9.2.5.
  • Differences between the sexes
  • 2.1.
  • 10.
  • two hemispheres of the brain -- B
  • 10.1.
  • Twentieth-century technology
  • 10.1.1.
  • 'Split-brain' operations
  • 10.1.2.
  • Operations which remove one side of the brain
  • 10.1.3.
  • Brain scans
  • Making faster progress
  • 10.1.4.
  • Other techniques
  • 10.2.
  • Conclusion
  • 11.
  • bounds of language acquisition
  • 11.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.
  • Deaf children
  • 1.
  • 2.2.
  • 11.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.2.
  • scientific interest of signing
  • 11.2.3.
  • Acquisition of a sign language
  • 11.3.
  • Hearing children of deaf parents
  • 11.4.
  • Severe deprivation: Genie
  • Multiple-word utterances
  • 11.4.1.
  • About Genie
  • 11.4.2.
  • research
  • 11.4.3.
  • Genie's achievements
  • 12.
  • Was Dr Dolittle lying?
  • 12.1.
  • Natural animal communication
  • 2.3.
  • 12.2.
  • Can animals be taught a human language?
  • 12.2.1.
  • Some early experiments with chimpanzees
  • 12.2.2.
  • Premacks and Sarah
  • 12.2.3.
  • Duane Rumbaugh and Lana
  • 12.2.4.
  • Savage-Rumbaugh and Kanzi
  • Acquiring words
  • 13.
  • 'Bootstrapping'- A
  • 13.1.
  • Introduction
  • 13.2.
  • Knowledge of the physical world
  • 13.3.
  • Discrimination of language sounds
  • 13.4.
  • From speech sound to syntax
  • 2.4.
  • 13.5.
  • Acquisition of vocabulary
  • 14.
  • 'Bootstrapping'- B
  • 14.1.
  • Acquisition of vocabulary
  • 14.2.
  • 'Constraints' on word learning
  • 14.2.1.
  • whole-object bias
  • sounds of the language
  • 14.2.2.
  • taxonomic bias
  • 14.2.3.
  • mutual exclusivity bias
  • 14.2.4.
  • shape bias
  • 14.2.5.
  • grammatical category bias
  • 14.3.
  • Criticisms of the 'bias' approach
  • 3.
  • 14.4.
  • more radical approach
  • 15.
  • best of both worlds?
  • 15.1.
  • Introduction
  • 15.2.
  • Fodor: the modularity of mind
  • 15.3.
  • Karmiloff-Smith: Beyond Modularity
  • Do we teach children to speak?
  • 15.4.
  • input from Piaget's theory
  • 15.5.
  • Evidence from children
  • 15.6.
  • Representational redescription
  • 15.7.
  • Is the marriage successful?
  • 15.8.
  • Connectionism
  • 3.1.
  • 15.9.
  • 'Rethinking innateness'
  • 16.
  • Conclusion
  • 16.1.
  • Conflicting basic assumptions
  • 16.2.
  • Affinities
  • 16.3.
  • Mind and brain
  • Some popular ideas
  • 16.4.
  • What I've left undone
  • 16.5.
  • For the future
  • 16.6.
  • Last words
  • Getting to rub two words together
  • 3.2.
  • sources of these beliefs
  • 3.3.
  • Early behaviourism
  • 3.3.1.
  • Pavlov's research
  • 3.3.2.
  • J. B. Watson
  • 3.3.3.
  • behaviourist conception of science
  • 1.1.
  • 3.3.4.
  • Are human beings just complex machines?
  • 3.3.5.
  • work of Leonard Bloomfield
  • 3.4.
  • work of B. F. Skinner
  • 3.5.
  • Why can't that be the way children acquire language?
  • 4.
  • Learning through touching and feeling
  • Introduction
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Piaget's account of cognitive growth
  • 4.2.1.
  • Sensori-motor learning
  • 4.2.2.
  • pre-operational stage
  • 4.2.3.
  • concrete operational stage
  • 1.2.
  • 4.2.4.
  • formal operational stage
  • 4.3.
  • Language development
  • 4.3.1.
  • Some experiments
  • 5.
  • What goes on in the mind?
  • 5.1.
  • Mentalism
  • Crying
  • 5.2.
  • Descartes' contribution to mentalism
  • 5.3.
  • Chomsky's contribution to mentalism
  • 5.3.1.
  • Scientific method
  • 5.3.2.
  • ideal speaker-listener
  • 5.3.3.
  • Competence and performance
  • 1.3.
  • 5.3.4.
  • Unconscious knowledge
  • 5.3.5.
  • Language capacities are innate
  • 5.3.6.
  • biological clock
  • 5.4.
  • debate between Piaget and Chomsky
  • 5.4.1.
  • highlight of the debate
  • Cooing
  • 5.5.
  • Was the debate the end of Piaget's model?
  • 6.
  • close look at Chomsky's theories
  • 6.1.
  • Innate principles
  • 6.2.
  • Socially based views on grammar
  • 6.3.
  • Scientific grammar
Control code
ocn123114106
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Rev. ed.
Extent
xvii, 277 p.
Isbn
9780826488800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill.
Label
Children's language : consensus and controversy, Ray Cattell
Publication
Note
Previous ed.: 2000
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-271) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.4.
  • 6.4.
  • Enough scrapes of grammar to keep you alive
  • 6.4.1.
  • Word classes
  • 6.4.2.
  • Nouns and verbs: getting to know them
  • 6.4.3.
  • Phrase structure
  • 6.5.
  • One way of deducing something about the mind
  • Babbling
  • 6.6.
  • Parameters
  • 7.
  • Do we help children to speak?
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Ferguson on baby-talk
  • 7.2.1.
  • Simplifying processes
  • 1.5.
  • 7.2.2.
  • Clarifying processes
  • 7.2.3.
  • Expressive processes
  • 7.2.4.
  • Discussion
  • 7.3.
  • early work of Catherine Snow
  • 7.4.
  • work of Newport and colleagues
  • first words
  • 7.5.
  • Wexler and Culicover
  • 7.6.
  • Discovery procedures
  • 7.7.
  • Snow drift
  • 7.8.
  • Doggerel
  • 7.9.
  • work of Anne Fernald
  • 1.6.
  • 8.
  • Learning how to mean
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Learning how to mean
  • 8.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.2.
  • What 'mean' means
  • Two-word utterances
  • 8.2.3.
  • child as active participant
  • 8.3.
  • Protolanguage (phase 1)
  • 8.4.
  • transition (phase 2)
  • 8.5.
  • adult language (phase 3)
  • 8.6.
  • Conclusion
  • 2.
  • 8.6.1.
  • scope of Halliday's work
  • 8.6.2.
  • Separate planets
  • 9.
  • two hemispheres of the brain -- A
  • 9.1.
  • physical brain
  • 9.2.
  • origins of knowledge about aphasia
  • Catching fire
  • 9.2.1.
  • Marc Dax
  • 9.2.2.
  • Paul Broca
  • 9.2.3.
  • Karl Wernicke
  • 9.2.4.
  • Handedness
  • 9.2.5.
  • Differences between the sexes
  • 2.1.
  • 10.
  • two hemispheres of the brain -- B
  • 10.1.
  • Twentieth-century technology
  • 10.1.1.
  • 'Split-brain' operations
  • 10.1.2.
  • Operations which remove one side of the brain
  • 10.1.3.
  • Brain scans
  • Making faster progress
  • 10.1.4.
  • Other techniques
  • 10.2.
  • Conclusion
  • 11.
  • bounds of language acquisition
  • 11.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.
  • Deaf children
  • 1.
  • 2.2.
  • 11.2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.2.
  • scientific interest of signing
  • 11.2.3.
  • Acquisition of a sign language
  • 11.3.
  • Hearing children of deaf parents
  • 11.4.
  • Severe deprivation: Genie
  • Multiple-word utterances
  • 11.4.1.
  • About Genie
  • 11.4.2.
  • research
  • 11.4.3.
  • Genie's achievements
  • 12.
  • Was Dr Dolittle lying?
  • 12.1.
  • Natural animal communication
  • 2.3.
  • 12.2.
  • Can animals be taught a human language?
  • 12.2.1.
  • Some early experiments with chimpanzees
  • 12.2.2.
  • Premacks and Sarah
  • 12.2.3.
  • Duane Rumbaugh and Lana
  • 12.2.4.
  • Savage-Rumbaugh and Kanzi
  • Acquiring words
  • 13.
  • 'Bootstrapping'- A
  • 13.1.
  • Introduction
  • 13.2.
  • Knowledge of the physical world
  • 13.3.
  • Discrimination of language sounds
  • 13.4.
  • From speech sound to syntax
  • 2.4.
  • 13.5.
  • Acquisition of vocabulary
  • 14.
  • 'Bootstrapping'- B
  • 14.1.
  • Acquisition of vocabulary
  • 14.2.
  • 'Constraints' on word learning
  • 14.2.1.
  • whole-object bias
  • sounds of the language
  • 14.2.2.
  • taxonomic bias
  • 14.2.3.
  • mutual exclusivity bias
  • 14.2.4.
  • shape bias
  • 14.2.5.
  • grammatical category bias
  • 14.3.
  • Criticisms of the 'bias' approach
  • 3.
  • 14.4.
  • more radical approach
  • 15.
  • best of both worlds?
  • 15.1.
  • Introduction
  • 15.2.
  • Fodor: the modularity of mind
  • 15.3.
  • Karmiloff-Smith: Beyond Modularity
  • Do we teach children to speak?
  • 15.4.
  • input from Piaget's theory
  • 15.5.
  • Evidence from children
  • 15.6.
  • Representational redescription
  • 15.7.
  • Is the marriage successful?
  • 15.8.
  • Connectionism
  • 3.1.
  • 15.9.
  • 'Rethinking innateness'
  • 16.
  • Conclusion
  • 16.1.
  • Conflicting basic assumptions
  • 16.2.
  • Affinities
  • 16.3.
  • Mind and brain
  • Some popular ideas
  • 16.4.
  • What I've left undone
  • 16.5.
  • For the future
  • 16.6.
  • Last words
  • Getting to rub two words together
  • 3.2.
  • sources of these beliefs
  • 3.3.
  • Early behaviourism
  • 3.3.1.
  • Pavlov's research
  • 3.3.2.
  • J. B. Watson
  • 3.3.3.
  • behaviourist conception of science
  • 1.1.
  • 3.3.4.
  • Are human beings just complex machines?
  • 3.3.5.
  • work of Leonard Bloomfield
  • 3.4.
  • work of B. F. Skinner
  • 3.5.
  • Why can't that be the way children acquire language?
  • 4.
  • Learning through touching and feeling
  • Introduction
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Piaget's account of cognitive growth
  • 4.2.1.
  • Sensori-motor learning
  • 4.2.2.
  • pre-operational stage
  • 4.2.3.
  • concrete operational stage
  • 1.2.
  • 4.2.4.
  • formal operational stage
  • 4.3.
  • Language development
  • 4.3.1.
  • Some experiments
  • 5.
  • What goes on in the mind?
  • 5.1.
  • Mentalism
  • Crying
  • 5.2.
  • Descartes' contribution to mentalism
  • 5.3.
  • Chomsky's contribution to mentalism
  • 5.3.1.
  • Scientific method
  • 5.3.2.
  • ideal speaker-listener
  • 5.3.3.
  • Competence and performance
  • 1.3.
  • 5.3.4.
  • Unconscious knowledge
  • 5.3.5.
  • Language capacities are innate
  • 5.3.6.
  • biological clock
  • 5.4.
  • debate between Piaget and Chomsky
  • 5.4.1.
  • highlight of the debate
  • Cooing
  • 5.5.
  • Was the debate the end of Piaget's model?
  • 6.
  • close look at Chomsky's theories
  • 6.1.
  • Innate principles
  • 6.2.
  • Socially based views on grammar
  • 6.3.
  • Scientific grammar
Control code
ocn123114106
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
Rev. ed.
Extent
xvii, 277 p.
Isbn
9780826488800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill.

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      53.403069 -2.963723
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