Coverart for item
The Resource Co-Operative Action, (electronic book)

Co-Operative Action, (electronic book)

Label
Co-Operative Action
Title
Co-Operative Action
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book investigates how language, embodiment, objects, and settings in historically shaped communities combine, and form human actions
Member of
Cataloging source
MiAaPQ
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Goodwin, Charles
Dewey number
302
LC call number
HM1111 .G663 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive and Computational Perspectives
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Social interaction.
  • Cooperativeness.
  • Social psychology
Label
Co-Operative Action, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Series information -- Title page -- Copyright information -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- List of figures -- Acknowledgments -- 1 What Is Co-Operative Action, and Why Is It Important? -- 1.1 Why Hyphenate Co- Operative? -- 1.1.1 The Conceptualization of Cooperation in Animal Experiments -- 1.2 Phenomena Implicated in Co- Operative Action -- 1.2.1 Language -- 1.2.2 Human Sociality -- 1.2.3 Creating Skilled, Competent Members -- 1.3 Brief Overview -- 1.3.1 Part I. Co- Operative Accumulative Action -- 1.3.2 Part II. Intertwined Semiosis -- 1.3.3 Part III. Embodied Interaction -- 1.3.4 Part IV. Co-Operative Action with Predecessors: Sedimented Landscapes ... -- 1.3.5 Part V. Professional Vision, Transforming Sensory Experience into Types, and the Creation ... -- 1.4 Transcription and Presentation of Data -- 1.5 Summary -- Part I Co-Operative Accumulative Action -- 2 Co-Operative Accumulation as a Pervasive Feature of the Organization of Action -- 2.1 Building New Action by Reusing with Transformation Materials Provided by Others -- 2.1.1 A Historical Digression -- 2.2 The Co-Operative Construction of Subsequent Action -- 2.2.1 Co-Operation(s) -- 2.2.2 Accumulation -- 2.2.3 Substrates -- 2.3 Varied Practices for Co-Operative Accumulation -- 2.3.1 Symbolic Language Embedded within Indexical and Iconic Forms of Semiosis -- 2.4 Summary -- 2.4.1 Building Action Co-Operatively on Substrates That Accumulate Resources -- 2.4.1.1 Accumulation -- 2.4.1.2 Substrates -- 2.5 The Combinatorial Organization of Language and Action as Visible Public Practice -- 2.6 The Dialogic Syntax of John Du Bois -- 2.7 The Extraordinarily Rich Language of Poor African-American Children -- 3 The Co-Operative Organization of Emerging Action -- 3.1 The Emergence of Objects within Lived Time -- 3.2 Multiparty Co-Operative Accumulation within Noun Phrases
  • 3.3 Competing Tellings -- 3.4 Inhabiting a Different World -- 4 Chil and His Resources -- 4.1 Chil's Resources -- 4.1.1 Chil's Life after His Stroke and How I Recorded His Interaction -- 5 Building Complex Meaning and Action with a Three-Word Vocabulary -- 5.1 Incorporating Rich Language Structure Produced by Others -- 5.2 Incorporating Talk Produced by Others While Transforming It -- 5.2.1 Indexical Incorporation -- 5.2.2 Symbols -- 5.2.3 Chains of Interpretants -- 5.3 Two Practices for Reusing, with Transformation, Materials Created Earlier by Others -- 6 The Distributed Speaker -- 6.1 The Distributed Organization of Both Speakers and Their Utterances -- 6.2 An Example of Cooperation -- 6.3 Symbols That Lack Necessary Indexical Grounding -- 6.4 Ideal, Self-Contained Fully Competent Actors, or Distributed Interactive Fields Encompassing Participants ... -- Part II Intertwined Semiosis -- 7 Intertwined Knowing -- 7.1 Differential Knowledge States as a Constitutive Feature of Human Action -- 7.1.1 Actively Sustaining a Complementary Distribution of Knowledge -- 7.2 Multiple Transformations within a Single Sentence -- 7.3 Conclusion -- 7.3.1 The Ongoing Organization of Awareness That Others Have Knowledge That Differs from Our Own through ... -- 7.3.2 The Interpreting Self as Unfolding Co-Operative Practice -- 7.3.3 The Shaping of Utterances, Actions, and Sentences within Interaction -- 7.3.4 Simultaneous Co-Operative Action -- 8 Building Action by Combining Different Kinds of Materials -- 8.1 Building Action by Joining Together Different Kinds of Resources -- 8.2 The Laminated Organization of Spoken Action -- 8.2.1 Inflecting Stance -- 8.3 Using Prosody to Build Varied Action with a Limited Lexicon -- 8.3.1 Saying Something Different by Building a New Contextual Configuration -- 8.4 Building Action through Use of Varied, Distributed Resources
  • 8.5 Chil's Timing -- 8.5.1 Exploiting Rhythm and Timing in American Football -- 8.6 Conclusion -- 9 Intertwined Actors -- 9.1 The Laminated Organization of Human Action -- 9.1.1 Delaminating Talk and Action Provided by Others -- 9.2 Laminated Co-Operative Action That Spans Centuries -- 9.3 Visible Co-Operations on Another's Emerging Talk -- 9.3.1 A Silent, though Visible Principal Character -- 9.3.2 Building Action by Performing Structure Preserving Visible Transformations on a Public Substrate -- 9.4 The Visible Cognitive Life of the Hearer -- 9.5 Temporally Unfolding Participation Central to the Organization of Human Action -- 9.6 Human Tools -- 9.7 The Combinatorial Organization of Human Tools as a Matrix for the Constitution of Human Social ... -- 9.8 Conclusion -- 10 Projection and the Interactive Organization of Unfolding Experience -- 10.1 Assessments -- 10.1.1 Embodied Responses by Recipients to Assessments -- 10.2 Assessment Adjectives as Guides for Hearers -- 10.3 Monitoring the Experiential Displays of Others -- 10.3.1 Bringing Assessment Activity to a Close -- 10.4 Conclusion -- 11 Projecting Upcoming Events to Accomplish Co-Operative Action -- 11.1 Movement to a Different Kind of Activity -- 11.2 Projecting the Loci for Collaborative Activity in Talk -- 11.2.1 Extended Overlap -- 11.2.2 Differential Access as an Organizing Feature of Concurrent Assessments -- 11.2.3 Making Visible Congruent Understanding -- 11.2.4 Erroneous Projection -- 11.2.5 Simultaneous Vocal and Nonvocal Heightened Involvement -- 11.2.6 Exiting from the Collaborative Assessment -- 11.2.7 Laminating Inconsistent Displays to Create Delicate Withdrawals -- Part III Embodied Interaction -- 12 Action and Co-Operative Embodiment in Girl's Hopscotch -- 12.1 Semiotic Structure in the Environment -- 12.2 Talk-in-Interaction -- 12.3 Changing Contextual Configurations
  • 12.4 Conclusion -- 13 Practices of Color Classification -- 13.1 Mapping a Feature -- 13.2 Semiotic Structure in the Environment -- 13.3 The Munsell Chart as a Historically Shaped Field for the Production of Action -- 13.4 Heterotopias -- 13.5 Building Action within Talk-in-Interaction with the Munsell Chart -- 13.6 The Intersubjective Constitution of the Objects That Animate the Work of a Community -- 13.6.1 The Intelligible Body: Embodied Stance and the Constitution of Action -- 13.7 Using Graphic Fields to Build Action -- 14 Highlighting and Mapping the World as Co-Operative Practice -- 14.1 Highlighting -- 14.2 Graphic Representations as Embodied Practice -- 14.3 Co-Operative Action as a Framework for Making Public Another's Understanding -- 14.4 Calibrating Professional Vision through Embodied Co-Operative Action within a Relevant Environment -- 15 Environmentally Coupled Gestures -- 15.1 Juxtaposing Multiple Semiotic Fields to Accomplish Pointing -- 15.2 Gestures Tied to the Environment -- 15.3 The Communicative Status of Environmentally Coupled Gestures -- 15.3.1 Embedding Gesture within Participation Frameworks -- 15.3.2 Multiple Forms of Embodied Semiosis Operate Simultaneously -- 15.4 The Accumulative Power of the Laminated Structure of Human Action -- 15.5 Conclusion -- Part IV Co-Operative Action with Predecessors -- 16 Co-Operative Action with Predecessors -- 16.1 The Consequential Presence of Absent Predecessors within Local Face-to-Face Interaction -- 16.1.1 The Special Character of Copresence -- 16.2 My Use of the Term "Predecessor" -- 16.3 Co-Operative Action with Absent Predecessors -- 16.3.1 Substrate Created Co-Operatively by Actors Distributed in Space and by Task -- 16.3.2 Transforming a Scene into Action-Relevant Objects -- 16.4 Organizing the Work-Relevant Perception of the Environment
  • 16.5 Co-Operative Accumulation Both with Those Who Are Present, and with the Materials Provided ... -- 16.6 The Schedule as a Cultural Umwelt -- 16.7 The Schedule Organizing Work-Relevant Perception within an Umwelt -- 17 The Accumulation of Diversity through Co-Operative Action -- 17.1 The Accumulative Power of Environmental Laminations as Components of Action -- 17.2 The Accumulation of Diversity -- 17.2.1 The Co-Operative Organization of Interaction with Predecessors -- 17.2.2 The Prospective Organization of Action through Substrates -- 17.3 Co-Operative Accumulation with Predecessors vs. Those Who Share Space and Time with Us ... -- 17.3.1 Accumulation Sustained through Co-Operative Action -- 17.4 Conclusion -- 18 Seeing in Depth -- 18.1 The Sampling Grid -- 18.1.1 Convergent Diversity -- 18.2 Tools -- 18.2.1 The CTD as a Tool for Perception -- 18.2.2 Multiple Perceptual Frameworks -- 18.2.3 Articulating the Document Surface -- 18.3 Seeing in Common -- 18.4 Hybrid Spaces: Space as Locally Organized, Historically Situated Practice -- 19 Co-Operative Action as the Source of, and Solution to, the Task Faced by Every Community of Creating New ... -- 19.1 Pedagogy a Human Universal -- 19.2 Repairs and the Display of Language Structure -- 19.3 The Accumulative Diversity of Settings and Communities and the Construction of Skilled Inhabitants -- 19.4 Creating Skilled Actors through Co-Operative Action -- 19.4.1 Seeing an Inappropriate Action and Intercepting It Before It Can Occur -- 19.5 Co-Operatively Breaking an Egg -- 19.6 Summary -- Part V Professional Vision, Transforming Sensory Experience into Types, and the Creation of Competent Inhabitants -- 20 The Emergence of Conventionalized Signs within the Natural World -- 20.1 Symbols -- 20.1.1 How Did Symbols Emerge in the Natural World? -- 20.1.2 Gesture as Precursor to Language?
  • 20.2 The Inherent Indeterminacy of Gesture
Control code
EBC5213008
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (558 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781108215497
Isbn Type
(ebk)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Co-Operative Action, (electronic book)
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Half-title -- Series information -- Title page -- Copyright information -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- List of figures -- Acknowledgments -- 1 What Is Co-Operative Action, and Why Is It Important? -- 1.1 Why Hyphenate Co- Operative? -- 1.1.1 The Conceptualization of Cooperation in Animal Experiments -- 1.2 Phenomena Implicated in Co- Operative Action -- 1.2.1 Language -- 1.2.2 Human Sociality -- 1.2.3 Creating Skilled, Competent Members -- 1.3 Brief Overview -- 1.3.1 Part I. Co- Operative Accumulative Action -- 1.3.2 Part II. Intertwined Semiosis -- 1.3.3 Part III. Embodied Interaction -- 1.3.4 Part IV. Co-Operative Action with Predecessors: Sedimented Landscapes ... -- 1.3.5 Part V. Professional Vision, Transforming Sensory Experience into Types, and the Creation ... -- 1.4 Transcription and Presentation of Data -- 1.5 Summary -- Part I Co-Operative Accumulative Action -- 2 Co-Operative Accumulation as a Pervasive Feature of the Organization of Action -- 2.1 Building New Action by Reusing with Transformation Materials Provided by Others -- 2.1.1 A Historical Digression -- 2.2 The Co-Operative Construction of Subsequent Action -- 2.2.1 Co-Operation(s) -- 2.2.2 Accumulation -- 2.2.3 Substrates -- 2.3 Varied Practices for Co-Operative Accumulation -- 2.3.1 Symbolic Language Embedded within Indexical and Iconic Forms of Semiosis -- 2.4 Summary -- 2.4.1 Building Action Co-Operatively on Substrates That Accumulate Resources -- 2.4.1.1 Accumulation -- 2.4.1.2 Substrates -- 2.5 The Combinatorial Organization of Language and Action as Visible Public Practice -- 2.6 The Dialogic Syntax of John Du Bois -- 2.7 The Extraordinarily Rich Language of Poor African-American Children -- 3 The Co-Operative Organization of Emerging Action -- 3.1 The Emergence of Objects within Lived Time -- 3.2 Multiparty Co-Operative Accumulation within Noun Phrases
  • 3.3 Competing Tellings -- 3.4 Inhabiting a Different World -- 4 Chil and His Resources -- 4.1 Chil's Resources -- 4.1.1 Chil's Life after His Stroke and How I Recorded His Interaction -- 5 Building Complex Meaning and Action with a Three-Word Vocabulary -- 5.1 Incorporating Rich Language Structure Produced by Others -- 5.2 Incorporating Talk Produced by Others While Transforming It -- 5.2.1 Indexical Incorporation -- 5.2.2 Symbols -- 5.2.3 Chains of Interpretants -- 5.3 Two Practices for Reusing, with Transformation, Materials Created Earlier by Others -- 6 The Distributed Speaker -- 6.1 The Distributed Organization of Both Speakers and Their Utterances -- 6.2 An Example of Cooperation -- 6.3 Symbols That Lack Necessary Indexical Grounding -- 6.4 Ideal, Self-Contained Fully Competent Actors, or Distributed Interactive Fields Encompassing Participants ... -- Part II Intertwined Semiosis -- 7 Intertwined Knowing -- 7.1 Differential Knowledge States as a Constitutive Feature of Human Action -- 7.1.1 Actively Sustaining a Complementary Distribution of Knowledge -- 7.2 Multiple Transformations within a Single Sentence -- 7.3 Conclusion -- 7.3.1 The Ongoing Organization of Awareness That Others Have Knowledge That Differs from Our Own through ... -- 7.3.2 The Interpreting Self as Unfolding Co-Operative Practice -- 7.3.3 The Shaping of Utterances, Actions, and Sentences within Interaction -- 7.3.4 Simultaneous Co-Operative Action -- 8 Building Action by Combining Different Kinds of Materials -- 8.1 Building Action by Joining Together Different Kinds of Resources -- 8.2 The Laminated Organization of Spoken Action -- 8.2.1 Inflecting Stance -- 8.3 Using Prosody to Build Varied Action with a Limited Lexicon -- 8.3.1 Saying Something Different by Building a New Contextual Configuration -- 8.4 Building Action through Use of Varied, Distributed Resources
  • 8.5 Chil's Timing -- 8.5.1 Exploiting Rhythm and Timing in American Football -- 8.6 Conclusion -- 9 Intertwined Actors -- 9.1 The Laminated Organization of Human Action -- 9.1.1 Delaminating Talk and Action Provided by Others -- 9.2 Laminated Co-Operative Action That Spans Centuries -- 9.3 Visible Co-Operations on Another's Emerging Talk -- 9.3.1 A Silent, though Visible Principal Character -- 9.3.2 Building Action by Performing Structure Preserving Visible Transformations on a Public Substrate -- 9.4 The Visible Cognitive Life of the Hearer -- 9.5 Temporally Unfolding Participation Central to the Organization of Human Action -- 9.6 Human Tools -- 9.7 The Combinatorial Organization of Human Tools as a Matrix for the Constitution of Human Social ... -- 9.8 Conclusion -- 10 Projection and the Interactive Organization of Unfolding Experience -- 10.1 Assessments -- 10.1.1 Embodied Responses by Recipients to Assessments -- 10.2 Assessment Adjectives as Guides for Hearers -- 10.3 Monitoring the Experiential Displays of Others -- 10.3.1 Bringing Assessment Activity to a Close -- 10.4 Conclusion -- 11 Projecting Upcoming Events to Accomplish Co-Operative Action -- 11.1 Movement to a Different Kind of Activity -- 11.2 Projecting the Loci for Collaborative Activity in Talk -- 11.2.1 Extended Overlap -- 11.2.2 Differential Access as an Organizing Feature of Concurrent Assessments -- 11.2.3 Making Visible Congruent Understanding -- 11.2.4 Erroneous Projection -- 11.2.5 Simultaneous Vocal and Nonvocal Heightened Involvement -- 11.2.6 Exiting from the Collaborative Assessment -- 11.2.7 Laminating Inconsistent Displays to Create Delicate Withdrawals -- Part III Embodied Interaction -- 12 Action and Co-Operative Embodiment in Girl's Hopscotch -- 12.1 Semiotic Structure in the Environment -- 12.2 Talk-in-Interaction -- 12.3 Changing Contextual Configurations
  • 12.4 Conclusion -- 13 Practices of Color Classification -- 13.1 Mapping a Feature -- 13.2 Semiotic Structure in the Environment -- 13.3 The Munsell Chart as a Historically Shaped Field for the Production of Action -- 13.4 Heterotopias -- 13.5 Building Action within Talk-in-Interaction with the Munsell Chart -- 13.6 The Intersubjective Constitution of the Objects That Animate the Work of a Community -- 13.6.1 The Intelligible Body: Embodied Stance and the Constitution of Action -- 13.7 Using Graphic Fields to Build Action -- 14 Highlighting and Mapping the World as Co-Operative Practice -- 14.1 Highlighting -- 14.2 Graphic Representations as Embodied Practice -- 14.3 Co-Operative Action as a Framework for Making Public Another's Understanding -- 14.4 Calibrating Professional Vision through Embodied Co-Operative Action within a Relevant Environment -- 15 Environmentally Coupled Gestures -- 15.1 Juxtaposing Multiple Semiotic Fields to Accomplish Pointing -- 15.2 Gestures Tied to the Environment -- 15.3 The Communicative Status of Environmentally Coupled Gestures -- 15.3.1 Embedding Gesture within Participation Frameworks -- 15.3.2 Multiple Forms of Embodied Semiosis Operate Simultaneously -- 15.4 The Accumulative Power of the Laminated Structure of Human Action -- 15.5 Conclusion -- Part IV Co-Operative Action with Predecessors -- 16 Co-Operative Action with Predecessors -- 16.1 The Consequential Presence of Absent Predecessors within Local Face-to-Face Interaction -- 16.1.1 The Special Character of Copresence -- 16.2 My Use of the Term "Predecessor" -- 16.3 Co-Operative Action with Absent Predecessors -- 16.3.1 Substrate Created Co-Operatively by Actors Distributed in Space and by Task -- 16.3.2 Transforming a Scene into Action-Relevant Objects -- 16.4 Organizing the Work-Relevant Perception of the Environment
  • 16.5 Co-Operative Accumulation Both with Those Who Are Present, and with the Materials Provided ... -- 16.6 The Schedule as a Cultural Umwelt -- 16.7 The Schedule Organizing Work-Relevant Perception within an Umwelt -- 17 The Accumulation of Diversity through Co-Operative Action -- 17.1 The Accumulative Power of Environmental Laminations as Components of Action -- 17.2 The Accumulation of Diversity -- 17.2.1 The Co-Operative Organization of Interaction with Predecessors -- 17.2.2 The Prospective Organization of Action through Substrates -- 17.3 Co-Operative Accumulation with Predecessors vs. Those Who Share Space and Time with Us ... -- 17.3.1 Accumulation Sustained through Co-Operative Action -- 17.4 Conclusion -- 18 Seeing in Depth -- 18.1 The Sampling Grid -- 18.1.1 Convergent Diversity -- 18.2 Tools -- 18.2.1 The CTD as a Tool for Perception -- 18.2.2 Multiple Perceptual Frameworks -- 18.2.3 Articulating the Document Surface -- 18.3 Seeing in Common -- 18.4 Hybrid Spaces: Space as Locally Organized, Historically Situated Practice -- 19 Co-Operative Action as the Source of, and Solution to, the Task Faced by Every Community of Creating New ... -- 19.1 Pedagogy a Human Universal -- 19.2 Repairs and the Display of Language Structure -- 19.3 The Accumulative Diversity of Settings and Communities and the Construction of Skilled Inhabitants -- 19.4 Creating Skilled Actors through Co-Operative Action -- 19.4.1 Seeing an Inappropriate Action and Intercepting It Before It Can Occur -- 19.5 Co-Operatively Breaking an Egg -- 19.6 Summary -- Part V Professional Vision, Transforming Sensory Experience into Types, and the Creation of Competent Inhabitants -- 20 The Emergence of Conventionalized Signs within the Natural World -- 20.1 Symbols -- 20.1.1 How Did Symbols Emerge in the Natural World? -- 20.1.2 Gesture as Precursor to Language?
  • 20.2 The Inherent Indeterminacy of Gesture
Control code
EBC5213008
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (558 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781108215497
Isbn Type
(ebk)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote

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