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The Resource Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy : the genesis of live cell imaging, Barry R. Masters, (electronic book)

Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy : the genesis of live cell imaging, Barry R. Masters, (electronic book)

Label
Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy : the genesis of live cell imaging
Title
Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy
Title remainder
the genesis of live cell imaging
Statement of responsibility
Barry R. Masters
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This text guides you through the principles and practical techniques of confocal and multiphoton microscopy. It also describes the historical connections and parallel inventions that resulted in modern techniques of live cell imaging and their use in biology and medicine. You will find comparisons of different types of confocal and multiphoton microscopes, solutions to the problems one would encounter when using various microscopic techniques, tips on selecting equipment, and an extensive annotated bibliography of additional resources
Member of
Additional physical form
Also available in print version.
Cataloging source
CaBNvSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Masters, Barry R.
Dewey number
502/.82
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QH224
LC item number
.M37 2006e
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Society of Photo-optical Instrumentation Engineers
Series statement
SPIE Press monograph
Series volume
161
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Multiphoton excitation microscopy
  • Confocal microscopy
Target audience
  • adult
  • specialized
Label
Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy : the genesis of live cell imaging, Barry R. Masters, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • "SPIE digital library."
  • "Press monographs v. PM161"--Provided by publisher
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-204) and index
Color
black and white
Contents
  • Part I. Optical microscopy. Chap. 1. A brief history of the microscope and its significance in the advancement of biology and medicine -- 1.1. Timeline of optical microscope development -- 1.2. Key developments of fluorescence microscopy and its limitations, genesis, and some applications -- 1.3. Key advances in biology and medicine made possible with the microscope -- 1.4. Summary
  • Chap. 2. The optical microscope: its principles, components, and limitations. -- 2.1. What is an optical microscope? -- 2.2. Image fidelity: mapping the object into the image -- 2.3. Optical aberrations -- 2.4. The compound microscope -- 2.5. Chief components of an optical microscope -- 2.6. Microscope objectives -- 2.7. Sets of conjugate planes in the optical microscope -- 2.8. Epi-illumination fluorescence microscope -- 2.9. Summary
  • Chap. 3. Abbe theory of image formation and diffraction of light in transmitted light microscopes. -- 3.1. The contributions of Abbe -- 3.2. Abbe diffraction theory of image formation and optical resolution in the light microscope -- 3.3. Summary
  • Chap. 4. Optical resolution and resolving power: what it is, how to measure it, and what limits it. -- 4.1. Criteria for two-point resolution -- 4.2. The role of depth discrimination -- 4.3. Point spread functions characterize microscope performance -- 4.4. Summary
  • Chap. 5. Techniques that provide contrast. -- 5.1. Nonoptical techniques -- 5.2. Optical techniques -- 5.3. Summary -- Part II. Confocal microscopy
  • Chap. 6. Early antecedents of confocal microscopy. -- 6.1. The problem with thick specimens in light microscopy -- 6.2. Some early attempts to solve these problems -- 6.3. Scanning optical microscopes: how scanning the illumination reduces light scatter and increases contrast -- 6.4. Some early developments of scanning optical microscopy -- 6.5. Summary
  • Chap. 7. Optical sectioning (depth discrimination) with different scanning techniques: the beginnings of confocal microscopy. -- 7.1. The confocal microscope: the problem and its solution -- 7.2. Stage-scanning confocal microscope invented by Marvin Minsky -- 7.3. Mojmir Petràn, Milan Hadravsky, and coworkers invent the tandem-scanning light microscope -- 7.4. Guoqing Xiao and Gordon Kino invent the one-sided cnfocal scanning light microscope -- 7.5. Effect of pinhole size and spacing on the performance of nipkow disk confocal microscopes -- 7.6. Akira Ichihara and coworkers at Yokogawa Institute Corporation invent a microlens Nipkow disk confocal microscope -- 7.7. Svishchev invents an oscillating mirror scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 7.8. Laser-scanning confocal microscope designs -- 7.9. Analytical expression of resolution in a confocal microscope -- 7.10. Comparison of different confocal microscope designs: Which one should you purchase? -- 7.11. Limitations of the confocal microscope -- 7.12. Summary
  • Chap. 8. The development of scanning-slit confocal systems for Imaging live cells, tissues, and organs. -- 8.1. Scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 8.2. Statement of the problem: slit width versus field of view -- 8.3. Goldmann's wide-field microscope -- 8.4. Maurice invents several types of specular microscopes -- 8.5. Svishchev's invention of a scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 8.6. Baer invents a tandem-scanning-slit confocal microscope with an oscillating moving mirror-slit assembly -- 8.7. Maurice invents a scanning-slit wide-field specular microscope -- 8.8. Koester invents a wide-field confocal (specular) microscope for in vivo imaging -- 8.9. Masters develops a confocal microscope based on the Maurice design with an axial scanning microscope objective -- 8.10. Thaer real-time scanning-slit clinical confocal microscope -- 8.11. Summary
  • Chap. 9. The components of a confocal microscope. -- 9.1. Light sources -- 9.2. Scanning systems -- 9.3. Dichroic mirrors and filters -- 9.4. Pinholes -- 9.5. Detectors -- 9.6. Microscope objectives -- 9.7. Summary
  • Part III. Nonlinear microscopy. Chap. 10. The development of nonlinear spectroscopy and microscopy. -- 10.1. Nonlinear optical processes in spectroscopy and microscopy -- 10.2. The nonlinear, scanning, harmonic optical microscope is invented at Oxford University -- 10.3. The role of lasers in the development of nonlinear microscopy -- 10.4. Summary
  • Chap. 11. Multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 11.1. Göppert-Mayer's theory of two-photon absorption -- 11.2. The denk, strickler, and webb science publication and patent -- 11.3. Comparison of multiphoton excitation microscopy and confocal microscopy -- 11.4. Summary
  • Chap. 12. Theory and instrumentation of multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 12.1. Theory -- 12.2. Instrumentation -- 12.3. Summary -- Part IV. The path to imaging live cells, tissues, and organs
  • Chap. 13. Remaining problems, limitations, and their partial solutions
  • Chap. 14. Speculation on future directions for confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 14.1. Correlative microscopy -- 14.2. Multimodal microscopes -- 14.3. In-vivo microscopy or live cell and tissue imaging -- 14.4. Instrument development -- 14.5. Summary
  • Chap. 15. Safety and cleanliness considerations. -- 15.1. Laser safety -- 15.2. How to clean optics -- Epilogue -- Appendix: Reference materials and resources -- Index
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 208 p. : ill.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Isbn
9780819461186
Other physical details
digital file.
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader
Label
Confocal microscopy and multiphoton excitation microscopy : the genesis of live cell imaging, Barry R. Masters, (electronic book)
Publication
Note
  • "SPIE digital library."
  • "Press monographs v. PM161"--Provided by publisher
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-204) and index
Color
black and white
Contents
  • Part I. Optical microscopy. Chap. 1. A brief history of the microscope and its significance in the advancement of biology and medicine -- 1.1. Timeline of optical microscope development -- 1.2. Key developments of fluorescence microscopy and its limitations, genesis, and some applications -- 1.3. Key advances in biology and medicine made possible with the microscope -- 1.4. Summary
  • Chap. 2. The optical microscope: its principles, components, and limitations. -- 2.1. What is an optical microscope? -- 2.2. Image fidelity: mapping the object into the image -- 2.3. Optical aberrations -- 2.4. The compound microscope -- 2.5. Chief components of an optical microscope -- 2.6. Microscope objectives -- 2.7. Sets of conjugate planes in the optical microscope -- 2.8. Epi-illumination fluorescence microscope -- 2.9. Summary
  • Chap. 3. Abbe theory of image formation and diffraction of light in transmitted light microscopes. -- 3.1. The contributions of Abbe -- 3.2. Abbe diffraction theory of image formation and optical resolution in the light microscope -- 3.3. Summary
  • Chap. 4. Optical resolution and resolving power: what it is, how to measure it, and what limits it. -- 4.1. Criteria for two-point resolution -- 4.2. The role of depth discrimination -- 4.3. Point spread functions characterize microscope performance -- 4.4. Summary
  • Chap. 5. Techniques that provide contrast. -- 5.1. Nonoptical techniques -- 5.2. Optical techniques -- 5.3. Summary -- Part II. Confocal microscopy
  • Chap. 6. Early antecedents of confocal microscopy. -- 6.1. The problem with thick specimens in light microscopy -- 6.2. Some early attempts to solve these problems -- 6.3. Scanning optical microscopes: how scanning the illumination reduces light scatter and increases contrast -- 6.4. Some early developments of scanning optical microscopy -- 6.5. Summary
  • Chap. 7. Optical sectioning (depth discrimination) with different scanning techniques: the beginnings of confocal microscopy. -- 7.1. The confocal microscope: the problem and its solution -- 7.2. Stage-scanning confocal microscope invented by Marvin Minsky -- 7.3. Mojmir Petràn, Milan Hadravsky, and coworkers invent the tandem-scanning light microscope -- 7.4. Guoqing Xiao and Gordon Kino invent the one-sided cnfocal scanning light microscope -- 7.5. Effect of pinhole size and spacing on the performance of nipkow disk confocal microscopes -- 7.6. Akira Ichihara and coworkers at Yokogawa Institute Corporation invent a microlens Nipkow disk confocal microscope -- 7.7. Svishchev invents an oscillating mirror scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 7.8. Laser-scanning confocal microscope designs -- 7.9. Analytical expression of resolution in a confocal microscope -- 7.10. Comparison of different confocal microscope designs: Which one should you purchase? -- 7.11. Limitations of the confocal microscope -- 7.12. Summary
  • Chap. 8. The development of scanning-slit confocal systems for Imaging live cells, tissues, and organs. -- 8.1. Scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 8.2. Statement of the problem: slit width versus field of view -- 8.3. Goldmann's wide-field microscope -- 8.4. Maurice invents several types of specular microscopes -- 8.5. Svishchev's invention of a scanning-slit confocal microscope -- 8.6. Baer invents a tandem-scanning-slit confocal microscope with an oscillating moving mirror-slit assembly -- 8.7. Maurice invents a scanning-slit wide-field specular microscope -- 8.8. Koester invents a wide-field confocal (specular) microscope for in vivo imaging -- 8.9. Masters develops a confocal microscope based on the Maurice design with an axial scanning microscope objective -- 8.10. Thaer real-time scanning-slit clinical confocal microscope -- 8.11. Summary
  • Chap. 9. The components of a confocal microscope. -- 9.1. Light sources -- 9.2. Scanning systems -- 9.3. Dichroic mirrors and filters -- 9.4. Pinholes -- 9.5. Detectors -- 9.6. Microscope objectives -- 9.7. Summary
  • Part III. Nonlinear microscopy. Chap. 10. The development of nonlinear spectroscopy and microscopy. -- 10.1. Nonlinear optical processes in spectroscopy and microscopy -- 10.2. The nonlinear, scanning, harmonic optical microscope is invented at Oxford University -- 10.3. The role of lasers in the development of nonlinear microscopy -- 10.4. Summary
  • Chap. 11. Multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 11.1. Göppert-Mayer's theory of two-photon absorption -- 11.2. The denk, strickler, and webb science publication and patent -- 11.3. Comparison of multiphoton excitation microscopy and confocal microscopy -- 11.4. Summary
  • Chap. 12. Theory and instrumentation of multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 12.1. Theory -- 12.2. Instrumentation -- 12.3. Summary -- Part IV. The path to imaging live cells, tissues, and organs
  • Chap. 13. Remaining problems, limitations, and their partial solutions
  • Chap. 14. Speculation on future directions for confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy. -- 14.1. Correlative microscopy -- 14.2. Multimodal microscopes -- 14.3. In-vivo microscopy or live cell and tissue imaging -- 14.4. Instrument development -- 14.5. Summary
  • Chap. 15. Safety and cleanliness considerations. -- 15.1. Laser safety -- 15.2. How to clean optics -- Epilogue -- Appendix: Reference materials and resources -- Index
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xix, 208 p. : ill.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Isbn
9780819461186
Other physical details
digital file.
Reformatting quality
access
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader

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