Coverart for item
The Resource Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures

Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures

Label
Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures
Title
Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
IDEBK
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Leenes, Ronald
Dewey number
005.8
Index
no index present
LC call number
QA76.9.A25
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Brakel, Rosamunde van
  • Gutwirth, Serge
  • Hert, Paul De
Series statement
Issues in Privacy and Data Protection
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Computer security
  • Data protection
  • Privacy
  • Computer networks
Label
Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword; Contents; Contributors; About the Authors; Part I: Fundamental and Legal Questions; Chapter 1: Legal Fundamentalism: Is Data Protection Really a Fundamental Right?; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The Disconnection of Data Protection from the Right to Privacy; 1.3 The Fundamentalisation of Data Protection; 1.4 What Is a Fundamental Right?; 1.5 Is Data Protection a Fundamental Right?; 1.6 Conclusion; Bibliography; Chapter 2: Is There a Right to Offline Alternatives in a Digital World?; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Context of the Problem: Why We Should Think About a Right to Remain Offline?
  • 2.2.1 The Value of Established Practices2.2.2 Basic Services and Their Dependence on Network Technologies; 2.2.3 Autonomy and Individual Property; 2.2.4 The Right to Remain Offline: An Individualist Approach to Societal Problems; 2.2.5 Individual Privacy vs. Public Benefits; 2.3 How Reasonable Is a Right to Offline Alternatives?; 2.3.1 To Be or Not To Be in the Network - Is Not the Question; 2.3.2 Techniques of De-networking: Social Relations in Absence of Interaction; 2.3.3 Why We (Can) Have a Right to Offline Alternatives; 2.4 What Is the Legal Status Quo?
  • 2.4.1 To Set the Scene: The "eCall Regulation"2.4.2 Legal Standard: Art. 7, 8 of the Charter; Scope; Restriction; Justification; 2.4.3 Conclusion; 2.5 Offline Alternatives in EU Policy Debates; 2.5.1 The Right to the Silence of the Chips on the European Policy Agenda; 2.5.2 A Paradigm Shift in European Politics?; 2.5.3 Digital Sovereignty, Algorithmic Regulation and the Individual; 2.6 Conclusion; Bibliography; Chapter 3: What Is New with the Internet of Things in Privacy and Data Protection? Four Legal Challenges on Sharing and Control in IoT; 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 IoT and Structural Data Sharing3.2.1 Levels of IoT; 3.2.2 Layers of IoT; 3.3 IoT and Groups; 3.3.1 The Meaning of a Group; 3.3.2 Group Privacy and Collective Data Protection; 3.3.3 A Look into the Future; 3.4 Agents Control; 3.4.1 Technological Convergence: On Robots and Data Controllers in IoE; 3.5 Standards; 3.6 Conclusions; References; Part II: Concepts and Tools; Chapter 4: Towards a Code of Conduct on Privacy for mHealth to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications; 4.1 Introduction: mHealth and the Problems with Trust; 4.1.1 Trust and Data Protection Law
  • 4.1.2 An Industry Code of Conduct to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications: Structure and Main Provisions Context and Aims; Structure and Main Provisions; Definition of Health Data; 4.1.3 The Sphere of User Control; Granular Consent; Control Over Advertisements; Children and Parental Consent; Transparent Information, Data Portability and Data Subjects' Rights; Wrap Up; 4.1.4 The Sphere of Technical and Organisational Measures; Data Controller and Data Processor; Incorporating Data Protection by Design and Data Protection by Default in Apps; Secondary Uses of Data
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319507965
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn973013599
Label
Data Protection and Privacy: (In)visibilities and Infrastructures
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Foreword; Contents; Contributors; About the Authors; Part I: Fundamental and Legal Questions; Chapter 1: Legal Fundamentalism: Is Data Protection Really a Fundamental Right?; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 The Disconnection of Data Protection from the Right to Privacy; 1.3 The Fundamentalisation of Data Protection; 1.4 What Is a Fundamental Right?; 1.5 Is Data Protection a Fundamental Right?; 1.6 Conclusion; Bibliography; Chapter 2: Is There a Right to Offline Alternatives in a Digital World?; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Context of the Problem: Why We Should Think About a Right to Remain Offline?
  • 2.2.1 The Value of Established Practices2.2.2 Basic Services and Their Dependence on Network Technologies; 2.2.3 Autonomy and Individual Property; 2.2.4 The Right to Remain Offline: An Individualist Approach to Societal Problems; 2.2.5 Individual Privacy vs. Public Benefits; 2.3 How Reasonable Is a Right to Offline Alternatives?; 2.3.1 To Be or Not To Be in the Network - Is Not the Question; 2.3.2 Techniques of De-networking: Social Relations in Absence of Interaction; 2.3.3 Why We (Can) Have a Right to Offline Alternatives; 2.4 What Is the Legal Status Quo?
  • 2.4.1 To Set the Scene: The "eCall Regulation"2.4.2 Legal Standard: Art. 7, 8 of the Charter; Scope; Restriction; Justification; 2.4.3 Conclusion; 2.5 Offline Alternatives in EU Policy Debates; 2.5.1 The Right to the Silence of the Chips on the European Policy Agenda; 2.5.2 A Paradigm Shift in European Politics?; 2.5.3 Digital Sovereignty, Algorithmic Regulation and the Individual; 2.6 Conclusion; Bibliography; Chapter 3: What Is New with the Internet of Things in Privacy and Data Protection? Four Legal Challenges on Sharing and Control in IoT; 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 IoT and Structural Data Sharing3.2.1 Levels of IoT; 3.2.2 Layers of IoT; 3.3 IoT and Groups; 3.3.1 The Meaning of a Group; 3.3.2 Group Privacy and Collective Data Protection; 3.3.3 A Look into the Future; 3.4 Agents Control; 3.4.1 Technological Convergence: On Robots and Data Controllers in IoE; 3.5 Standards; 3.6 Conclusions; References; Part II: Concepts and Tools; Chapter 4: Towards a Code of Conduct on Privacy for mHealth to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications; 4.1 Introduction: mHealth and the Problems with Trust; 4.1.1 Trust and Data Protection Law
  • 4.1.2 An Industry Code of Conduct to Foster Trust Amongst Users of Mobile Health Applications: Structure and Main Provisions Context and Aims; Structure and Main Provisions; Definition of Health Data; 4.1.3 The Sphere of User Control; Granular Consent; Control Over Advertisements; Children and Parental Consent; Transparent Information, Data Portability and Data Subjects' Rights; Wrap Up; 4.1.4 The Sphere of Technical and Organisational Measures; Data Controller and Data Processor; Incorporating Data Protection by Design and Data Protection by Default in Apps; Secondary Uses of Data
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319507965
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn973013599

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