Coverart for item
The Resource Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery, Yrjö H. Roos, Yoav D. Livney, editors

Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery, Yrjö H. Roos, Yoav D. Livney, editors

Label
Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery
Title
Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery
Statement of responsibility
Yrjö H. Roos, Yoav D. Livney, editors
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book introduces recovery and stabilization of common bioactive materials in foods as well as materials science aspects of engineering stable bioactive delivery systems. The book also describes most typical unit operations and processes used in recovery and manufacturing of food ingredients and foods with stabilized bioactive components. The 15 chapters of the book discuss in detail substances that need to be protected and delivered via foods and beverages to achieve good stability, bioavailability and efficacy. Dedicated chapters present current and novel technologies used for stabilization and delivery of bioactive components. The material included covers formulation, stability, digestive release, bioaccessability and bioavailability. The text features a special emphasis on the materials science and technological aspects required for stabilization and successful production of foods with bioactive components. Consumer demand for healthier, yet satisfying food products is posing increasingly tough challenges for the food industry. Scientific research reveals new bioactive food components and new functionalities of known components. Food materials science has also developed to a stage where food materials can be designed and produced to protect sensitive components for their delivery in complex food products. Such delivery systems must meet high safety and efficacy requirements and regulations, as well as economic viability criteria and consumer acceptance
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
  • 664/.06
  • 540
Index
index present
LC call number
  • TX531
  • QD1-999
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Roos, Yrjö H.
  • Livney, Yoav D.
Series statement
Food engineering series,
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Food
  • Food industry and trade
  • Chemistry
  • Food Science
  • Biochemistry, general
  • Microengineering
Label
Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery, Yrjö H. Roos, Yoav D. Livney, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; Contents; 1 Recovery Technologies for Lipophilic Bioactives; Abstract; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.2.1 Carotenoids; 1.2.2 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) ; 1.2.3 Tocopherols and Tocotrienols; 1.2.4 Phytosterols; 1.2.5 Squalene; 1.2.6 Essential Oils; 1.3 Methodologies for Extraction of Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.3.1 Conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.3.2 Non-conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.3.2.1 Supercritical Fluid Extraction; 1.3.2.2 Other Non-conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.4 Extraction of Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.4.1 Carotenoids
  • 1.4.2 Fatty Acids1.4.3 Tocopherols and Tocotrienols; 1.4.4 Phytosterols; 1.4.5 Squalene; 1.4.6 Essential Oils; 1.5 Process Optimization for Targeting Bioactivity; 1.6 Summary; References; 2 Recovery Technologies for Water-Soluble Bioactives: Advances in Membrane-Based Processes; Abstract; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Basic Principles of Pressure-Driven Membrane Operations; 2.2.1 Membrane Types and Modules; 2.2.2 Pressure-Driven Membrane Operations; 2.2.3 Concentration Polarization and Membrane Fouling; 2.3 Milk and Dairy Industry; 2.3.1 Milk Processing; 2.3.2 Whey Processing
  • 2.4 Fish-Processing Wastewater Treatment2.5 Recovery of Bioactive Compounds from Vegetable Extracts; 2.5.1 Soy Protein Extracts; 2.5.2 Olive Mill Wastewater; 2.6 Conclusions and Future Trends; References; 3 Industrial Production of Active Probiotics for Food Enrichment; Abstract; 3.1 Introduction to Probiotics; 3.2 Industrial Probiotic Products; 3.2.1 Fortified Dairy Products; 3.2.1.1 Probiotic Milk; 3.2.1.2 Probiotic Cheese; 3.2.1.3 Probiotic Yogurt; 3.2.2 Whey (Protein)-Based Probiotic Products; 3.3 Applications of Probiotics; 3.3.1 Medical Applications; 3.3.2 Soil Fertility in Agriculture
  • 3.3.3 Veterinary Applications3.3.4 Aquaculture Enhancement; 3.4 Probiotic Stability; 3.4.1 Technological Approach for Stability of Industrial Probiotics; 3.4.1.1 Extruded Beads; 3.4.1.2 Emulsion Precipitation; 3.4.1.3 Spray Drying; 3.4.2 Biological Approaches for Producing Industrially Stable Probiotics; 3.4.2.1 Screening for Naturally Resistant Strains; 3.4.2.2 Acclimatization of Naturally Occurring Probiotic Strains; 3.4.2.3 Producing Genetically Engineered Strains; 3.5 Safety of Probiotics; 3.6 Technological Hurdles; 3.7 Present and Future of Probiotics; 3.8 Conclusions; References
  • 4 Microencapsulation TechnologiesAbstract; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Ingredients Used in the Formulation of Food-Grade Microencapsulated Products; 4.3 Microencapsulation Technologies for Bioactive Delivery; 4.3.1 Physical Processes; 4.3.1.1 Drying; Spray Drying; Freeze Drying; 4.3.1.2 Spray Chilling; 4.3.1.3 Fluidized Bed Coating; 4.3.1.4 Extrusion; Extrusion-Dripping Technologies; Extrusion Cooking; 4.3.1.5 Spinning Disk Systems; 4.3.1.6 Supercritical Fluid Encapsulation; 4.3.2 Physico-chemical Processes; 4.3.2.1 Coacervation; 4.3.2.2 Inclusion Complexation; 4.3.2.3 Liposome Entrapment
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781493965953
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
10.1007/978-1-4939-6595-3
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn965374524
Label
Engineering foods for bioactives stability and delivery, Yrjö H. Roos, Yoav D. Livney, editors
Publication
Note
Includes index
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; Contents; 1 Recovery Technologies for Lipophilic Bioactives; Abstract; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.2.1 Carotenoids; 1.2.2 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) ; 1.2.3 Tocopherols and Tocotrienols; 1.2.4 Phytosterols; 1.2.5 Squalene; 1.2.6 Essential Oils; 1.3 Methodologies for Extraction of Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.3.1 Conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.3.2 Non-conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.3.2.1 Supercritical Fluid Extraction; 1.3.2.2 Other Non-conventional Extraction Techniques; 1.4 Extraction of Lipophilic Bioactives; 1.4.1 Carotenoids
  • 1.4.2 Fatty Acids1.4.3 Tocopherols and Tocotrienols; 1.4.4 Phytosterols; 1.4.5 Squalene; 1.4.6 Essential Oils; 1.5 Process Optimization for Targeting Bioactivity; 1.6 Summary; References; 2 Recovery Technologies for Water-Soluble Bioactives: Advances in Membrane-Based Processes; Abstract; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Basic Principles of Pressure-Driven Membrane Operations; 2.2.1 Membrane Types and Modules; 2.2.2 Pressure-Driven Membrane Operations; 2.2.3 Concentration Polarization and Membrane Fouling; 2.3 Milk and Dairy Industry; 2.3.1 Milk Processing; 2.3.2 Whey Processing
  • 2.4 Fish-Processing Wastewater Treatment2.5 Recovery of Bioactive Compounds from Vegetable Extracts; 2.5.1 Soy Protein Extracts; 2.5.2 Olive Mill Wastewater; 2.6 Conclusions and Future Trends; References; 3 Industrial Production of Active Probiotics for Food Enrichment; Abstract; 3.1 Introduction to Probiotics; 3.2 Industrial Probiotic Products; 3.2.1 Fortified Dairy Products; 3.2.1.1 Probiotic Milk; 3.2.1.2 Probiotic Cheese; 3.2.1.3 Probiotic Yogurt; 3.2.2 Whey (Protein)-Based Probiotic Products; 3.3 Applications of Probiotics; 3.3.1 Medical Applications; 3.3.2 Soil Fertility in Agriculture
  • 3.3.3 Veterinary Applications3.3.4 Aquaculture Enhancement; 3.4 Probiotic Stability; 3.4.1 Technological Approach for Stability of Industrial Probiotics; 3.4.1.1 Extruded Beads; 3.4.1.2 Emulsion Precipitation; 3.4.1.3 Spray Drying; 3.4.2 Biological Approaches for Producing Industrially Stable Probiotics; 3.4.2.1 Screening for Naturally Resistant Strains; 3.4.2.2 Acclimatization of Naturally Occurring Probiotic Strains; 3.4.2.3 Producing Genetically Engineered Strains; 3.5 Safety of Probiotics; 3.6 Technological Hurdles; 3.7 Present and Future of Probiotics; 3.8 Conclusions; References
  • 4 Microencapsulation TechnologiesAbstract; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Ingredients Used in the Formulation of Food-Grade Microencapsulated Products; 4.3 Microencapsulation Technologies for Bioactive Delivery; 4.3.1 Physical Processes; 4.3.1.1 Drying; Spray Drying; Freeze Drying; 4.3.1.2 Spray Chilling; 4.3.1.3 Fluidized Bed Coating; 4.3.1.4 Extrusion; Extrusion-Dripping Technologies; Extrusion Cooking; 4.3.1.5 Spinning Disk Systems; 4.3.1.6 Supercritical Fluid Encapsulation; 4.3.2 Physico-chemical Processes; 4.3.2.1 Coacervation; 4.3.2.2 Inclusion Complexation; 4.3.2.3 Liposome Entrapment
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781493965953
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other control number
10.1007/978-1-4939-6595-3
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn965374524

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