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The Resource Fables less and less fabulous : English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations, Horst Dölvers

Fables less and less fabulous : English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations, Horst Dölvers

Label
Fables less and less fabulous : English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations
Title
Fables less and less fabulous
Title remainder
English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations
Statement of responsibility
Horst Dölvers
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This study examines more than one hundred fables in prose and verse, most of them original in content, some highly original in form. Author Horst Dolvers refutes the assumption that the fable declined in popularity after 1800 and the days of La Fontaine, Swift, Gay, and Lessing. Most of the texts studied in this book are taken from Victoria collections and poetry anthologies, and are presumably unknown. An extensive documentation presents verse fables according to the different functions they served - in humor, satire, and education, religious and philosophical speculation, and as drawing-room entertainment full of erotic innuendo. Mere stock-taking is not this book's intent, however. Its second part focuses on three Victorian books, applying semiotics (including theories of discourse). A review essay of Lord Lytton's Fables in Song (1874) by Robert Louis Stevenson contains perceptive remarks on the "post-Darwinian fable," a newly developing variant turning away from "old stories of wise animals or foolish men" to confront "truths that are a matter of bitter concern." Lytton's reveries deserve rediscovery as narratives that skillfully manipulate their readers by a hierachical ordering of discourses - nudging them into ideological positions that, to many readers, must have appeared commonsensical. At the same time, they tend to sap the complacencies of common sense. A picture book by Walter Crane, an Aesop in limericks (1887), shows the illustrator's art as no less Houdinian. Finally, Anna Sewell's children's classic Black Beauty, if simple, should be read as anything but plain; its speaking silences make the reader feel that man and beast are divided rather than united by their ability to communicate. The horses, shown as capable of speaking like humans, do not share man's multiplicity of discourses - nor consequently, the duplicity resulting from their use
Cataloging source
DCC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1937-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dölvers, Horst
Government publication
government publication level undetermined
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Children's literature, English
  • Didactic literature, English
  • Illustration of books
  • English literature
  • Didactic literature, English
  • Parables
  • Fables, English
  • Parables
  • Fables, English
  • English literature
Label
Fables less and less fabulous : English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations, Horst Dölvers
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 184-196) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The semiotics of fable discourse: three books:
  • Lord Lytton's Fables in song (I): the source of R.L. Stevenson's Theory of the nineteenth-century fable
  • Lord Lytton's Fables in song (II): semiotic model and individual text
  • Walter Crane's The baby's own Aesop: visual countertexts in a Victorian picture book
  • "Let beasts bear gentle minds": fable into animal biography
  • Introduction: the fable of the fable's death
  • pt. 1.
  • An abundance of fables:
  • Humor, satire, education
  • Emblematics and vers de société
  • Verse fables between piety and skepticism
  • "Thank God there are no wolves in England!": fables in prose
  • pt. 2.
Control code
980096038210
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
207 p
Isbn
9780874135848
Lccn
lc96038210
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill
Label
Fables less and less fabulous : English fables and parables of the nineteenth century and their illustrations, Horst Dölvers
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 184-196) and indexes
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The semiotics of fable discourse: three books:
  • Lord Lytton's Fables in song (I): the source of R.L. Stevenson's Theory of the nineteenth-century fable
  • Lord Lytton's Fables in song (II): semiotic model and individual text
  • Walter Crane's The baby's own Aesop: visual countertexts in a Victorian picture book
  • "Let beasts bear gentle minds": fable into animal biography
  • Introduction: the fable of the fable's death
  • pt. 1.
  • An abundance of fables:
  • Humor, satire, education
  • Emblematics and vers de société
  • Verse fables between piety and skepticism
  • "Thank God there are no wolves in England!": fables in prose
  • pt. 2.
Control code
980096038210
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
207 p
Isbn
9780874135848
Lccn
lc96038210
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill

Library Locations

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      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
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