Coverart for item
The Resource FinTech innovation : from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification, Paolo Sironi

FinTech innovation : from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification, Paolo Sironi

Label
FinTech innovation : from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification
Title
FinTech innovation
Title remainder
from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification
Statement of responsibility
Paolo Sironi
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sironi, Paolo
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
The Wiley finance series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Financial services industry
  • Finance
  • Financial engineering
Label
FinTech innovation : from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification, Paolo Sironi
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: Preface Acknowledgments About the Author I Personalise personal finance! 1 The theory of innovation: from Robo-Advisors to Goal Based Investing and Gamification 1.1 Introduction 1.2 A vibrant FinTech ecosystem 1.3 Some definitions, ladies and gentlemen 1.4 Personalisation is king 1.5 The theory of innovation 1.6 My Robo-Advisor is an iPod 1.7 What incumbents should consider when thinking about FinTech innovation 1.8 Conclusions II Automated long-term investing means robo-technology! 2 Robo-Advisors: neither robots nor advisors 2.1 Introduction 2.2 What is a Robo-Advisor 2.3 Automated digital businesses for underserved markets 2.4 Passive investment management with ETFs 2.5 Algorithms of automated portfolio rebalancing 2.6 Personalised decision-making, individual goals and behaviour 2.7 Single minded businesses 2.8 Principles of tax-loss harvesting 2.9 Conclusions 3 The transformation of the supply-side 3.1 Introduction 3.2 The investment management supply-demand chain 3.3 How intermediaries make money 3.4 Issuers of direct claims (debt owners) 3.5 The institutionalisation of the private banking relationship 3.6 The digital financial advisor 3.7 Asset management is being disintermediated 3.8 ETF providers and the Pirro's victory 3.9 Vertically integrated solutions challenge traditional platforms 3.10 Conclusions 4 Social and technology mega trends shape a new family of taxable investors 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Generational shift (X, Y, Z and HENRYs) 4.3 About transparency, simplicity and trust 4.4 The cognitive era 4.5 Conclusions 5 The industry's dilemma and the future of digital advice 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Wealth management firms: go digital or die! 5.3 Asset management firms: less passive, more active! 5.4 Robo-Platforms: less transactions, more portfolios! 5.5 Digital-Advisors: empowered customisation! 5.6 Robo-Advisors: be human, be virtual, mind retirement! 5.7 Conclusions: clients take centre stage, at last! III Goal Based Investing is the spirit of the industry! 6 The principles of Goal Based Investing: personalise the investment experience 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Foundations of Goal Based Investing 6.3 About personal needs, goals and risks 6.4 Goal Based Investing process 6.5 What changes in portfolio modeling 6.6 Personal values 6.7 Goals elicitation 6.8 Goals priority 6.9 Time horizons 6.10 Risk tolerance 6.11 Reporting goal-centric performance 6.12 Conclusions 7 The investment journey: from model asset allocations to goal-based operational portfolios 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Main traits of Modern Portfolio Theory 7.2.1 Assets diversification and efficient frontier 7.2.2 The Mean-Variance model portfolio 7.2.3 Final remarks about Mean-Variance 7.3 Main traits of Black-Litterman 7.3.1 The equilibrium market portfolio 7.3.2 Embedding professional views 7.3.3 The Black-Litterman's optimal portfolio 7.3.4 Final remarks on Black-Litterman 7.4 Mean-Variance and mental accounts. 7.5 Main traits of Probabilistic Scenario Optimisation 7.5.1 The PSO Process 7.5.2 The investor's risk and return profile 7.5.3 Generation of scenarios and scenario paths 7.5.4 Stochastic simulation of products and portfolios over time 7.5.5 Potential and admissible portfolios: allocation constraints 7.5.6 Adequate portfolios: risk adequacy 7.5.7 Objective function: probability maximisation 7.5.8 Final remarks on PSO 7.5.9 Conclusions 8 Goal Based Investing and Gamification 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Principles of Gamification 8.3 Gamification of wealth management 8.4 The mechanics of games 8.5 Conclusions Concluding remarks Bibliography Index
Control code
033156884
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxi, 157 pages :
Isbn
9781119226987
Lccn
2016011452
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Label
FinTech innovation : from robo-advisors to goals based investing and gamification, Paolo Sironi
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: Preface Acknowledgments About the Author I Personalise personal finance! 1 The theory of innovation: from Robo-Advisors to Goal Based Investing and Gamification 1.1 Introduction 1.2 A vibrant FinTech ecosystem 1.3 Some definitions, ladies and gentlemen 1.4 Personalisation is king 1.5 The theory of innovation 1.6 My Robo-Advisor is an iPod 1.7 What incumbents should consider when thinking about FinTech innovation 1.8 Conclusions II Automated long-term investing means robo-technology! 2 Robo-Advisors: neither robots nor advisors 2.1 Introduction 2.2 What is a Robo-Advisor 2.3 Automated digital businesses for underserved markets 2.4 Passive investment management with ETFs 2.5 Algorithms of automated portfolio rebalancing 2.6 Personalised decision-making, individual goals and behaviour 2.7 Single minded businesses 2.8 Principles of tax-loss harvesting 2.9 Conclusions 3 The transformation of the supply-side 3.1 Introduction 3.2 The investment management supply-demand chain 3.3 How intermediaries make money 3.4 Issuers of direct claims (debt owners) 3.5 The institutionalisation of the private banking relationship 3.6 The digital financial advisor 3.7 Asset management is being disintermediated 3.8 ETF providers and the Pirro's victory 3.9 Vertically integrated solutions challenge traditional platforms 3.10 Conclusions 4 Social and technology mega trends shape a new family of taxable investors 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Generational shift (X, Y, Z and HENRYs) 4.3 About transparency, simplicity and trust 4.4 The cognitive era 4.5 Conclusions 5 The industry's dilemma and the future of digital advice 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Wealth management firms: go digital or die! 5.3 Asset management firms: less passive, more active! 5.4 Robo-Platforms: less transactions, more portfolios! 5.5 Digital-Advisors: empowered customisation! 5.6 Robo-Advisors: be human, be virtual, mind retirement! 5.7 Conclusions: clients take centre stage, at last! III Goal Based Investing is the spirit of the industry! 6 The principles of Goal Based Investing: personalise the investment experience 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Foundations of Goal Based Investing 6.3 About personal needs, goals and risks 6.4 Goal Based Investing process 6.5 What changes in portfolio modeling 6.6 Personal values 6.7 Goals elicitation 6.8 Goals priority 6.9 Time horizons 6.10 Risk tolerance 6.11 Reporting goal-centric performance 6.12 Conclusions 7 The investment journey: from model asset allocations to goal-based operational portfolios 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Main traits of Modern Portfolio Theory 7.2.1 Assets diversification and efficient frontier 7.2.2 The Mean-Variance model portfolio 7.2.3 Final remarks about Mean-Variance 7.3 Main traits of Black-Litterman 7.3.1 The equilibrium market portfolio 7.3.2 Embedding professional views 7.3.3 The Black-Litterman's optimal portfolio 7.3.4 Final remarks on Black-Litterman 7.4 Mean-Variance and mental accounts. 7.5 Main traits of Probabilistic Scenario Optimisation 7.5.1 The PSO Process 7.5.2 The investor's risk and return profile 7.5.3 Generation of scenarios and scenario paths 7.5.4 Stochastic simulation of products and portfolios over time 7.5.5 Potential and admissible portfolios: allocation constraints 7.5.6 Adequate portfolios: risk adequacy 7.5.7 Objective function: probability maximisation 7.5.8 Final remarks on PSO 7.5.9 Conclusions 8 Goal Based Investing and Gamification 8.1 Introduction 8.2 Principles of Gamification 8.3 Gamification of wealth management 8.4 The mechanics of games 8.5 Conclusions Concluding remarks Bibliography Index
Control code
033156884
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xxi, 157 pages :
Isbn
9781119226987
Lccn
2016011452
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n

Library Locations

    • Sydney Jones LibraryBorrow it
      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
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