Coverart for item
The Resource First person plural : aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship, Sophie McCall, (electronic book)

First person plural : aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship, Sophie McCall, (electronic book)

Label
First person plural : aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship
Title
First person plural
Title remainder
aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship
Statement of responsibility
Sophie McCall
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Told-to narratives, or collaboratively produced texts by Aboriginal storytellers and (usually) non-Aboriginal writers, often confound traditional literary understandings of voice and authorship. In this innovative exploration, these unique narratives are not romanticized as unmediated translations of oral documents, nor are they dismissed as corruptions of original works. Rather, the approach emphasizes the interpenetration of authorship and collaboration. Discussing a wide range of told-to narratives, including ethnography, recorded (auto)biography, testimonial life narrative, documentary, myth, legend, and song, Sophie McCall explores the multifaceted implications of the choices that editors, translators, narrators, and filmmakers make as they channel these narratives into new forms
  • Focused on the 1990s, when debates over voice and representation were particularly explosive, this comprehensive study examines collaboratively produced texts in conjunction with key political events that have shaped the struggle for Aboriginal rights in Canada. Emphasizing the scope rather than the limits of the told-to narrative, McCall considers how Aboriginal voices have been represented in a range of forums such as public inquiries, commissioners' reports, and land claims court cases. A captivating inquiry, First Person Plural offers a vital, interdisciplinary discussion of how told-to narratives contribute to larger debates about Indigenous voice and literary and political sovereignty."--pub. website
  • "Sophie McCall's splendid First Person Plural enlarges the genre of works purporting to be collaborative. Beyond writing, she includes land claims negotiations, commissioners' reports, media representations, and film. She traces the rise of Indigenous voice in Canada through the final decades of the twentieth century. Students, scholars, and anyone interested in First Nations and Native American literature will welcome this book." -- J. Cruikshank (review) "First Person Plural gets at the crux of one of the most important issues in contemporary indigenous studies: the problem of cultural location in the interpretive situation. In this fascinating study, McCall complicates the division between cultural insides and outsides, and she accomplishes this through a series of nuanced and beautifully modulated readings. This timely book moves beyond polemics to present us with a newly invigorated mode of interpretation that will open many new possibilities in the field." -- W. Cariou (review), pub. website
Member of
Cataloging source
CaPaEBR
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1969-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McCall, Sophie
Dewey number
971.004/97
Index
index present
LC call number
E78.C2
LC item number
M33 2011eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • standards specifications
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Intercultural communication
  • Authorship
  • Oral tradition
Label
First person plural : aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship, Sophie McCall, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [230]-245) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. 'Where Is the Voice Coming From?': Appropriations and Subversions of the 'Native Voice' -- 2. Coming to Voice the North: The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry and the Works of Hugh Brody -- 3. 'There Is a Time Bomb in Canada': The Legacy of the Oka Crisis -- 4. 'My Story Is a Gift': The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples and the Politics of Reconciliation -- 5. 'What The Map Cuts Up, the Story Cuts Across': Translating Oral Traditions and Aboriginal Land Title -- 6. 'I Can Only Sing This Song to Someone Who Understands It': Community Filmmaking and the Politics of Partial Translation -- Conclusion: Collaborative Authorship and Literary Sovereignty
Control code
purchebr10492759
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 254 pages).
Form of item
electronic
Governing access note
SINGLE USER ACCESS. This e-book is restricted to one viewer at any one time. If the e-book is already in use you will automatically be placed in a queue and notified when it becomes available. This e-book will automatically be released after 10 minutes of inactivity. You may download a chapter or page range (subject to the same limits as for printing) as a permanent PDF image file for use on a computer or e-book reading device (including a Kindle). We have disabled the 'download entire e-book' option for this single-user title because no other user would have access whilst it was downloaded to you. Follow the HELP link above for more details
Isbn
9780774819794
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Original version note
Original electronic resource
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Specific material designation
remote
Label
First person plural : aboriginal storytelling and the ethics of collaborative authorship, Sophie McCall, (electronic book)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [230]-245) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. 'Where Is the Voice Coming From?': Appropriations and Subversions of the 'Native Voice' -- 2. Coming to Voice the North: The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry and the Works of Hugh Brody -- 3. 'There Is a Time Bomb in Canada': The Legacy of the Oka Crisis -- 4. 'My Story Is a Gift': The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples and the Politics of Reconciliation -- 5. 'What The Map Cuts Up, the Story Cuts Across': Translating Oral Traditions and Aboriginal Land Title -- 6. 'I Can Only Sing This Song to Someone Who Understands It': Community Filmmaking and the Politics of Partial Translation -- Conclusion: Collaborative Authorship and Literary Sovereignty
Control code
purchebr10492759
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 254 pages).
Form of item
electronic
Governing access note
SINGLE USER ACCESS. This e-book is restricted to one viewer at any one time. If the e-book is already in use you will automatically be placed in a queue and notified when it becomes available. This e-book will automatically be released after 10 minutes of inactivity. You may download a chapter or page range (subject to the same limits as for printing) as a permanent PDF image file for use on a computer or e-book reading device (including a Kindle). We have disabled the 'download entire e-book' option for this single-user title because no other user would have access whilst it was downloaded to you. Follow the HELP link above for more details
Isbn
9780774819794
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Original version note
Original electronic resource
Reproduction note
Electronic resource.
Specific material designation
remote

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