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The Resource Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making, Virginia Dressler

Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making, Virginia Dressler

Label
Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making
Title
Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making
Statement of responsibility
Virginia Dressler
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
As digital collections continue to grow, the underlying technologies to serve up content also continue to expand and develop. As such, new challenges are presented which continue to test ethical ideologies in everyday environs of the practitioner. There are currently no solid guidelines or overarching codes of ethics to address such issues. The digitization of modern archival collections, in particular, presents interesting conundrums when factors of privacy are weighed and reviewed in both small and mass digitization initiatives. Ethical decision making needs to be present at the onset of project planning in digital projects of all sizes, and we also need to identify the role and responsibility of the practitioner to make more virtuous decisions on behalf of those with no voice or awareness of potential privacy breaches. In this book, notions of what constitutes private information are discussed, as is the potential presence of such information in both analog and digital collections. This book lays groundwork to introduce the topic of privacy within digital collections by providing some examples from documented real-world scenarios and making recommendations for future research. A discussion of the notion privacy as concept will be included, as well as some historical perspective (with perhaps one the most cited work on this topic, for example, Warren and Brandeis' "Right to Privacy," 1890). Concepts from the The Right to Be Forgotten case in 2014 (Google Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, Mario Costeja González) are discussed as to how some lessons may be drawn from the response in Europe and also how European data privacy laws have been applied. The European ideologies are contrasted with the Right to Free Speech in the First Amendment in the U.S., highlighting the complexities in setting guidelines and practices revolving around privacy issues when applied to real life scenarios. Two ethical theories are explored: Consequentialism and Deontological. Finally, ethical decision making models will also be applied to our framework of digital collections. Three case studies are presented to illustrate how privacy can be defined within digital collections in some real-world examples
Member of
Cataloging source
CaBNVSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dressler, Virginia
Dewey number
025.00285
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
ZA4080
LC item number
.D744 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • abstracts summaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Digital libraries
  • Privacy, Right of
Target audience
  • adult
  • specialized
Label
Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making, Virginia Dressler
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 75-83)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Framing privacy within digital collections -- 1.1 Digital collections -- 1.2 Basic concepts -- 1.3 Privacy: main concepts and overview -- 1.4 Violation of privacy -- 1.5 Types of personal data -- 1.6 Defining personal data -- 1.7 Concealment/unconcealment -- 1.8 A discord between "Information (almost) wants to be free" and "Not all information wants to be free" --
  • 2. Core ethical theories and decision making frameworks -- 2.1 Background -- 2.2 Consequentialism -- 2.3 Deontological -- 2.4 Ethical decision making: models and resources -- 2.5 Examples of code of ethics -- 2.6 Conclusion --
  • 3. Role of the practitioner as active agent and notions of privacy in digital collections -- 3.1 Addressing the notion of harm -- 3.2 The right to be forgotten and the EU data privacy laws -- 3.3 Conflict of free speech and privacy -- 3.4 Real-world examples: lawsuits, case studies, and other relevant research -- 3.5 Other considerations for decision making --
  • 4. Core values and considerations for the practitioner -- 4.1 Ethical decision making and the digital librarian -- 4.2 Role of policy -- 4.3 Law and the role of general counsel -- 4.4 Dissemination as disclosure -- 4.5 Moving toward privacy Nirvana? Tavani's perfect privacy theories -- 4.6 Privacy review in real-world applications -- 4.7 Setting the stage for good practice -- 4.8 Ethical decision making: gauging harm and acknowledging responsibility -- 4.9 Privacy assessment and review -- 4.10 Future directions and conclusion: morals, transparency, and participation --
  • Appendix -- Bibliography -- Author biography
Control code
201807ICR064
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 PDF (xxii, 85 pages)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers
Isbn
9781681734026
Media category
electronic
Media MARC source
isbdmedia
Other control number
10.2200/S00863ED1V01Y201807ICR064
Other physical details
illustrations.
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader
Label
Framing privacy in digital collections with ethical decision making, Virginia Dressler
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 75-83)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Framing privacy within digital collections -- 1.1 Digital collections -- 1.2 Basic concepts -- 1.3 Privacy: main concepts and overview -- 1.4 Violation of privacy -- 1.5 Types of personal data -- 1.6 Defining personal data -- 1.7 Concealment/unconcealment -- 1.8 A discord between "Information (almost) wants to be free" and "Not all information wants to be free" --
  • 2. Core ethical theories and decision making frameworks -- 2.1 Background -- 2.2 Consequentialism -- 2.3 Deontological -- 2.4 Ethical decision making: models and resources -- 2.5 Examples of code of ethics -- 2.6 Conclusion --
  • 3. Role of the practitioner as active agent and notions of privacy in digital collections -- 3.1 Addressing the notion of harm -- 3.2 The right to be forgotten and the EU data privacy laws -- 3.3 Conflict of free speech and privacy -- 3.4 Real-world examples: lawsuits, case studies, and other relevant research -- 3.5 Other considerations for decision making --
  • 4. Core values and considerations for the practitioner -- 4.1 Ethical decision making and the digital librarian -- 4.2 Role of policy -- 4.3 Law and the role of general counsel -- 4.4 Dissemination as disclosure -- 4.5 Moving toward privacy Nirvana? Tavani's perfect privacy theories -- 4.6 Privacy review in real-world applications -- 4.7 Setting the stage for good practice -- 4.8 Ethical decision making: gauging harm and acknowledging responsibility -- 4.9 Privacy assessment and review -- 4.10 Future directions and conclusion: morals, transparency, and participation --
  • Appendix -- Bibliography -- Author biography
Control code
201807ICR064
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 PDF (xxii, 85 pages)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Governing access note
Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers
Isbn
9781681734026
Media category
electronic
Media MARC source
isbdmedia
Other control number
10.2200/S00863ED1V01Y201807ICR064
Other physical details
illustrations.
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader

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