Coverart for item
The Resource Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals, (electronic book)

Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals, (electronic book)

Label
Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals
Title
Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Algae have a long history of use as foods and for the production of food ingredients. There is also increasing interest in their exploitation as sources of bioactive compounds for use in functional foods and nutraceuticals. Functional ingredients from algae for foods and nutraceuticals reviews key topics in these areas, encompassing both macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae. After a chapter introducing the concept of algae as a source of biologically active ingredients for the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals, part one explores the structure and occurrence of the major
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Dominguez, H
Dewey number
664.07
Index
no index present
LC call number
TP372.5 .F384 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Functional foods
  • Algae as food
  • Algae products
  • Food
  • Algae as food
  • Algae products
  • Food
  • Functional foods
Label
Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
9 Anticancer agents derived from marine algae
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Functional ingredientsfrom algae for foods andnutraceuticals; Copyright; Contents; Contributor contact details; Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition; Preface; 1 Algae as a source of biologically active ingredients for the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Algae; 1.3 Functional foods and nutraceuticals; 1.4 Algae as a potential raw material for bioactive ingredients; 1.5 Conclusions; 1.6 References; Part I Structure and occurrence of the major algal components; 2 Chemical structures of algal polysaccharides
  • 2.1 Introduction2.2 Polysaccharides of the red algae (Rhodophyta); 2.3 Polysaccharides of the brown algae (Phaeophyceae); 2.4 Polysaccharides of the green algae (Chlorophyta); 2.5 Polysaccharides of several microalgae; 2.6 Conclusions and future trends; 2.7 References; 3 Algal lipids, fatty acids and sterols; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Structure and occurrence of algal lipids; 3.3 Structure and occurrence of algal fatty acids, oxylipins and sterols; 3.4 Recent advances in algal lipid methodology and lipidomics; 3.5 Seasonal variations; 3.6 Environmental variations; 3.7 Nutritional implications
  • 3.8 Conclusions and future trends3.9 Sources of further information and advice; 3.10 References; 3.11 Appendix: acronyms; 4 Algal proteins, peptides and amino acids; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Isolation strategies; 4.3 Analysis and quantitation; 4.4 Macroalgae; 4.5 Microalgae; 4.6 Conclusions and future trends; 4.7 References; 5 Phlorotannins; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Structure and classification; 5.3 Detection and quantitation; 5.4 Seasonal and environmental variations of phlorotannins; 5.5 Isolation strategies; 5.6 Structure elucidation; 5.7 Pharmacological activities
  • 5.8 Conclusions and future trends5.9 References; 6 Pigments and minor compounds in algae; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Nutritional elements in macroalgae; 6.3 Pigments in macroalgae; 6.4 Minerals and trace elements; 6.5 Vitamins; 6.6 Factors influencing vitamin content of seaweed; 6.7 Conclusions and future trends; 6.8 References; Part II Biological properties of algae and algal components; 7 Antioxidant properties of algal components and fractions; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Determining antioxidant activity; 7.3 Defining antioxidant behaviour through animal models; 7.4 Mechanisms of action
  • 7.5 Potential applications of active biological compounds from marine algae7.6 Conclusions and future trends; 7.7 References; 8 Antimicrobial activity of compounds isolated from algae; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 Factors affecting the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds extracted from seaweeds; 8.3 Antimicrobial susceptibility testing; 8.4 Efficacy of hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts on bacteria associated with food safety and quality; 8.5 Screening and purification of antimicrobial crude seaweed extracts using thin layer chromatography (TLC)-bioautography; 8.6 Conclusions; 8.7 References
Control code
SCIDI866444645
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (766 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780857098689
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Functional Ingredients from Algae for Foods and Nutraceuticals, (electronic book)
Publication
Note
9 Anticancer agents derived from marine algae
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Functional ingredientsfrom algae for foods andnutraceuticals; Copyright; Contents; Contributor contact details; Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition; Preface; 1 Algae as a source of biologically active ingredients for the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Algae; 1.3 Functional foods and nutraceuticals; 1.4 Algae as a potential raw material for bioactive ingredients; 1.5 Conclusions; 1.6 References; Part I Structure and occurrence of the major algal components; 2 Chemical structures of algal polysaccharides
  • 2.1 Introduction2.2 Polysaccharides of the red algae (Rhodophyta); 2.3 Polysaccharides of the brown algae (Phaeophyceae); 2.4 Polysaccharides of the green algae (Chlorophyta); 2.5 Polysaccharides of several microalgae; 2.6 Conclusions and future trends; 2.7 References; 3 Algal lipids, fatty acids and sterols; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Structure and occurrence of algal lipids; 3.3 Structure and occurrence of algal fatty acids, oxylipins and sterols; 3.4 Recent advances in algal lipid methodology and lipidomics; 3.5 Seasonal variations; 3.6 Environmental variations; 3.7 Nutritional implications
  • 3.8 Conclusions and future trends3.9 Sources of further information and advice; 3.10 References; 3.11 Appendix: acronyms; 4 Algal proteins, peptides and amino acids; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Isolation strategies; 4.3 Analysis and quantitation; 4.4 Macroalgae; 4.5 Microalgae; 4.6 Conclusions and future trends; 4.7 References; 5 Phlorotannins; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Structure and classification; 5.3 Detection and quantitation; 5.4 Seasonal and environmental variations of phlorotannins; 5.5 Isolation strategies; 5.6 Structure elucidation; 5.7 Pharmacological activities
  • 5.8 Conclusions and future trends5.9 References; 6 Pigments and minor compounds in algae; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Nutritional elements in macroalgae; 6.3 Pigments in macroalgae; 6.4 Minerals and trace elements; 6.5 Vitamins; 6.6 Factors influencing vitamin content of seaweed; 6.7 Conclusions and future trends; 6.8 References; Part II Biological properties of algae and algal components; 7 Antioxidant properties of algal components and fractions; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Determining antioxidant activity; 7.3 Defining antioxidant behaviour through animal models; 7.4 Mechanisms of action
  • 7.5 Potential applications of active biological compounds from marine algae7.6 Conclusions and future trends; 7.7 References; 8 Antimicrobial activity of compounds isolated from algae; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 Factors affecting the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds extracted from seaweeds; 8.3 Antimicrobial susceptibility testing; 8.4 Efficacy of hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts on bacteria associated with food safety and quality; 8.5 Screening and purification of antimicrobial crude seaweed extracts using thin layer chromatography (TLC)-bioautography; 8.6 Conclusions; 8.7 References
Control code
SCIDI866444645
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (766 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780857098689
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote

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