Coverart for item
The Resource Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature

Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature

Label
Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature
Title
Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
UkLiU
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cook, Laurence Martin
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Biological diversity
  • Species diversity
Label
Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 184-187) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART ONE. SPECIES ABUNDANCE : 1. Species Diversity -- 1.1 Prologue -- 1.2 Molecular Currency -- 1.3 Species Multiplicity -- 1.4 Methods of Classification -- 1.5 Summary -- 2. Explanations -- 2.1 Adaptation -- 2.2 Adaptive Interrelationships -- 2.3 Trophic systems -- 2.4 Habitat Distribution -- 2.5 Niches -- 2.6 Adaptive Radiations -- 2.7 Conclusion -- 2.8 Summary -- 3. Dynamics -- 3.1 Evolution and natural selection -- 3.2 Definition of species -- 3.3 Conclusion -- 3.4 Summary -- PART TWO. POPULATION PROCESSES : 4. Populations -- 4.1 Growth, regulation, and interaction -- 4.2 Rates and generations in single populations -- 4.3 Species interactions -- 4.4 The panmictic population -- 4.5 Natural selection -- 4.6 Phenotypic variation -- 4.7 Selective elimination -- 4.8 Calculation of intensity and selective value -- 4.9 Life cycles -- 4.10 Summary -- 5. Genes -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Mendelian genetics -- 5.3 Molecular genetics -- 5.4 Gene action -- 5.5 Non-segregating characters -- 5.6 Heritability -- 5. Conclusion -- 5.8 Summary -- 6. Gene frequency -- 6.1 Dynamics of gene frequency change -- 6.2 The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium -- 6.3 Factors modifying frequencies -- 6.4 Dispersive effect. Size determinate in principle, direction indeterminate -- 6.5 Systematic effects. Size and direction both determinate in principle -- 6.6 Non-recurrent effects. Size and direction indeterminate -- 6.7 Conclusion -- 6.8 Summary -- 7. Genetic Variability in Natural Populations -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Visual and other polymorphisms -- 7.3 Continuously varying characters -- 7.4 Enzyme and molecular studies -- 7.5 Conclusion -- 7.6 Summary -- 8. Polymorphism and ecological genetics -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Heterozygote advantage and transient polymorphism -- 8.3 Some other ways to maintain polymorphism -- 8.4 Is heterozygote advantage general? -- 8.5 Evolution of heterozygote advantage -- 8.6 Summary -- 9. Response to selection by pesticides -- 9.1 The problem of resistance -- 9.2 Pattern of selection -- 9.3 A general model -- 9.4 Summary -- 10. Population consequence of selection -- 10.1 Genetic load -- 10.2 Mutational Load -- 10.3 Substitutional load -- 10.4 does load limit selection? -- 10.5 Objections to the load argument -- 10.6 Conclusion -- 10.7 Summary -- 11. Polymorphism and neutral mutation -- 11.1 Intro -- 11.2 Arguments for neutral mutation -- 11.3 The neutral theory -- 11.4 Predictions arising from the theory -- 11.5 Explanations for non-agreement observed and expected H -- 11.6 Conclusion -- 11.7 Summary -- 12. Gene interaction models for polymorphism -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Non-segregating characters -- 12.3 Outbreeding -- 12.4 Outbreeding and deleterious mutants -- 12.5 Genetic homeostasis -- 12.6 Summary -- 13. Genetic variability-conclusions -- 13.1 What are the main causes of polymorphism? -- 13.2 A note on statistical limits -- 13.3 Summary -- PART THREE. POPULATION GENETICS AND EVOLUTION : 14. Species formation and evolution -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Allopatric species formation -- 14.3 Sympatric species formation -- 14.4 Parapatric species formation -- 14.5 Species formation -- conclusion -- 14.6 The shifting balance theory -- 14.7 Peripheral diversity -- 14.8 Static and changing patterns -- 14.9 Species section -- 14.10 Summary -- 15. Species associations -- 15.1 Geographical diversity -- 15.2 Competition and community structure -- 15.3 Conclusion -- 15.4 Summary
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 192 pages
Isbn
9780412356209
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
Label
Genetic and ecological diversity: the sport of nature
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 184-187) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
PART ONE. SPECIES ABUNDANCE : 1. Species Diversity -- 1.1 Prologue -- 1.2 Molecular Currency -- 1.3 Species Multiplicity -- 1.4 Methods of Classification -- 1.5 Summary -- 2. Explanations -- 2.1 Adaptation -- 2.2 Adaptive Interrelationships -- 2.3 Trophic systems -- 2.4 Habitat Distribution -- 2.5 Niches -- 2.6 Adaptive Radiations -- 2.7 Conclusion -- 2.8 Summary -- 3. Dynamics -- 3.1 Evolution and natural selection -- 3.2 Definition of species -- 3.3 Conclusion -- 3.4 Summary -- PART TWO. POPULATION PROCESSES : 4. Populations -- 4.1 Growth, regulation, and interaction -- 4.2 Rates and generations in single populations -- 4.3 Species interactions -- 4.4 The panmictic population -- 4.5 Natural selection -- 4.6 Phenotypic variation -- 4.7 Selective elimination -- 4.8 Calculation of intensity and selective value -- 4.9 Life cycles -- 4.10 Summary -- 5. Genes -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Mendelian genetics -- 5.3 Molecular genetics -- 5.4 Gene action -- 5.5 Non-segregating characters -- 5.6 Heritability -- 5. Conclusion -- 5.8 Summary -- 6. Gene frequency -- 6.1 Dynamics of gene frequency change -- 6.2 The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium -- 6.3 Factors modifying frequencies -- 6.4 Dispersive effect. Size determinate in principle, direction indeterminate -- 6.5 Systematic effects. Size and direction both determinate in principle -- 6.6 Non-recurrent effects. Size and direction indeterminate -- 6.7 Conclusion -- 6.8 Summary -- 7. Genetic Variability in Natural Populations -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Visual and other polymorphisms -- 7.3 Continuously varying characters -- 7.4 Enzyme and molecular studies -- 7.5 Conclusion -- 7.6 Summary -- 8. Polymorphism and ecological genetics -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Heterozygote advantage and transient polymorphism -- 8.3 Some other ways to maintain polymorphism -- 8.4 Is heterozygote advantage general? -- 8.5 Evolution of heterozygote advantage -- 8.6 Summary -- 9. Response to selection by pesticides -- 9.1 The problem of resistance -- 9.2 Pattern of selection -- 9.3 A general model -- 9.4 Summary -- 10. Population consequence of selection -- 10.1 Genetic load -- 10.2 Mutational Load -- 10.3 Substitutional load -- 10.4 does load limit selection? -- 10.5 Objections to the load argument -- 10.6 Conclusion -- 10.7 Summary -- 11. Polymorphism and neutral mutation -- 11.1 Intro -- 11.2 Arguments for neutral mutation -- 11.3 The neutral theory -- 11.4 Predictions arising from the theory -- 11.5 Explanations for non-agreement observed and expected H -- 11.6 Conclusion -- 11.7 Summary -- 12. Gene interaction models for polymorphism -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Non-segregating characters -- 12.3 Outbreeding -- 12.4 Outbreeding and deleterious mutants -- 12.5 Genetic homeostasis -- 12.6 Summary -- 13. Genetic variability-conclusions -- 13.1 What are the main causes of polymorphism? -- 13.2 A note on statistical limits -- 13.3 Summary -- PART THREE. POPULATION GENETICS AND EVOLUTION : 14. Species formation and evolution -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Allopatric species formation -- 14.3 Sympatric species formation -- 14.4 Parapatric species formation -- 14.5 Species formation -- conclusion -- 14.6 The shifting balance theory -- 14.7 Peripheral diversity -- 14.8 Static and changing patterns -- 14.9 Species section -- 14.10 Summary -- 15. Species associations -- 15.1 Geographical diversity -- 15.2 Competition and community structure -- 15.3 Conclusion -- 15.4 Summary
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 192 pages
Isbn
9780412356209
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)

Library Locations

    • Brunswick Library StoreBorrow it
      Liverpool, GB
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