Coverart for item
The Resource Hemorheology and hemodynamics, Giles R. Cokelet, (electronic book)

Hemorheology and hemodynamics, Giles R. Cokelet, (electronic book)

Label
Hemorheology and hemodynamics
Title
Hemorheology and hemodynamics
Statement of responsibility
Giles R. Cokelet
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
From the perspective of blood flow, blood has some unusual properties: it is a suspension of blood cells of which the red blood cells are most numerous and are both deformable (at moderate and high flow rates) and will aggregate under conditions of slow flow. Also, the cellular volume concentration is high (about 40-45%). These features cause blood to have variable viscosity, dependent on flow conditions, and cause both red blood cell sedimentation and syneresis effects under slow flow conditions (which can lead to rheological artifacts). These effects also cause unusual flow phenomena when blood flows in systems of small diameter vessels (especially for diameters of about 500 ?m or less). These phenomena are seen in non-uniform cell distributions in vessel cross sections, a cell-poor layer of mostly blood plasma at vessels walls, non-proportionate cellular distribution during blood flow through vascular bifurcations, which leads to a very wide distribution of vessel cellular concentrations (from zero to systemic values) in the smaller vessels of the microcirculation, etc. All these phenomena are discussed in this book, as well as the difficulties presented by in vivo microvessels having non-ideal geometries
Member of
Cataloging source
CaBNVSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cokelet, Giles R.
Dewey number
612.1
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
QP105.15
LC item number
.C654 2011
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • abstracts summaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Colloquium series on integrated systems physiology, from molecule to function
Series volume
21
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Blood
  • Hemodynamics
Target audience
specialized
Label
Hemorheology and hemodynamics, Giles R. Cokelet, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 125-134)
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • 1. Introduction --
  • 2. The composition of blood -- 2.1 The plasma -- 2.2 The blood cells -- 2.2.1 Erythrocytes -- 2.2.1.1 RBC deformation -- 2.2.1.2 RBC aggregation -- 2.2.1.3 Proposed RBC aggregation mechanisms -- 2.2.1.4 Effects due to RBC aggregation -- 2.2.2 Leukocytes -- 2.2.3 Platelets --
  • 3. Viscometers -- 3.1 Tube viscometers -- 3.2 Concentric cylinder viscometer -- 3.3 Cone-and-plate viscometers --
  • 4. Constitutive equations --
  • 5. At last, experimental data! -- 5.1 Plasma -- 5.2 RBC contents -- 5.3 Syneresis effect, the source of another artifact -- 5.4 Sedimentation artifacts -- 5.5 Normal blood rheology -- 5.5.1 The effect of temperature on blood's rheological properties -- 5.5.2 Blood's yield stress and the casson equation -- 5.5.3 Other constitutive equations -- 5.5.4 Viscoelasticity of blood --
  • 6. Some in vitro blood flows -- 6.1 Presentation of data -- 6.1.1 Large diameter tubes -- 6.2 Blood flow in relatively small diameter tubes -- 6.3 Some mathematical models of blood flow in vessels -- 6.3.1 Models of blood flow in capillaries -- 6.3.2 Blood flow in vessels with diameters of 20 um or more --
  • 7. The Fahraeus effect -- 7.1 Interpretation -- 7.2 White blood cells and platelets --
  • 8. The Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect -- 8.1 Blood flow through vascular bifurcations -- 8.2 Disproportionate RBC distribution at bifurcations -- 8.3 Separation surfaces -- 8.4 Recovery length --
  • 9. In vitro arterial-type bifurcation experimental data -- 9.1 Single bifurcations -- 9.2 Successive bifurcations --
  • 10. In vivo experimental bifurcation data -- 10.1 Data --
  • 11. Flow in microvascular networks -- 11.1 The Whittaker-Winton experiment -- 11.2 Mathematical models of blood flow through networks -- 11.3 Fluctuations of flow in networks --
  • 12. Optimization -- 12.1 Transport region -- 12.1.1 Single vessels -- 12.1.2 Flow through arterial type bifurcations -- 12.2 Mass transfer region -- 12.2.1 Erlang-Krogh model of oxygen transport -- 12.2.2 Optimum hematocrit --
  • 13. Concluding statement -- References
Control code
201106ISP021
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 electronic text (viii, 134 p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Isbn
9781615041633
Other physical details
ill., digital file
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader
Label
Hemorheology and hemodynamics, Giles R. Cokelet, (electronic book)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 125-134)
Color
multicolored
Contents
  • 1. Introduction --
  • 2. The composition of blood -- 2.1 The plasma -- 2.2 The blood cells -- 2.2.1 Erythrocytes -- 2.2.1.1 RBC deformation -- 2.2.1.2 RBC aggregation -- 2.2.1.3 Proposed RBC aggregation mechanisms -- 2.2.1.4 Effects due to RBC aggregation -- 2.2.2 Leukocytes -- 2.2.3 Platelets --
  • 3. Viscometers -- 3.1 Tube viscometers -- 3.2 Concentric cylinder viscometer -- 3.3 Cone-and-plate viscometers --
  • 4. Constitutive equations --
  • 5. At last, experimental data! -- 5.1 Plasma -- 5.2 RBC contents -- 5.3 Syneresis effect, the source of another artifact -- 5.4 Sedimentation artifacts -- 5.5 Normal blood rheology -- 5.5.1 The effect of temperature on blood's rheological properties -- 5.5.2 Blood's yield stress and the casson equation -- 5.5.3 Other constitutive equations -- 5.5.4 Viscoelasticity of blood --
  • 6. Some in vitro blood flows -- 6.1 Presentation of data -- 6.1.1 Large diameter tubes -- 6.2 Blood flow in relatively small diameter tubes -- 6.3 Some mathematical models of blood flow in vessels -- 6.3.1 Models of blood flow in capillaries -- 6.3.2 Blood flow in vessels with diameters of 20 um or more --
  • 7. The Fahraeus effect -- 7.1 Interpretation -- 7.2 White blood cells and platelets --
  • 8. The Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect -- 8.1 Blood flow through vascular bifurcations -- 8.2 Disproportionate RBC distribution at bifurcations -- 8.3 Separation surfaces -- 8.4 Recovery length --
  • 9. In vitro arterial-type bifurcation experimental data -- 9.1 Single bifurcations -- 9.2 Successive bifurcations --
  • 10. In vivo experimental bifurcation data -- 10.1 Data --
  • 11. Flow in microvascular networks -- 11.1 The Whittaker-Winton experiment -- 11.2 Mathematical models of blood flow through networks -- 11.3 Fluctuations of flow in networks --
  • 12. Optimization -- 12.1 Transport region -- 12.1.1 Single vessels -- 12.1.2 Flow through arterial type bifurcations -- 12.2 Mass transfer region -- 12.2.1 Erlang-Krogh model of oxygen transport -- 12.2.2 Optimum hematocrit --
  • 13. Concluding statement -- References
Control code
201106ISP021
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 electronic text (viii, 134 p.)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
electronic
Isbn
9781615041633
Other physical details
ill., digital file
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
System details
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader

Library Locations

Processing Feedback ...