Coverart for item
The Resource Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice, Meng Li, David P. Tracer, editors

Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice, Meng Li, David P. Tracer, editors

Label
Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice
Title
Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice
Statement of responsibility
Meng Li, David P. Tracer, editors
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This volume brings together cutting-edge research from emerging and senior scholars alike representing a variety of disciplines that bears on human preferences for fairness, equity and justice. Despite predictions derived from evolutionary and economic theories that individuals will behave in the service of maximizing their own utility and survival, humans not only behave cooperatively, but in many instances, truly altruistically, giving to unrelated others at a cost to themselves. Humans also seem preoccupied like no other species with issues of fairness, equity and justice. But what exactly is fair and how are norms of fairness maintained? How should we decide, and how do we decide, between equity and efficiency? How does the idea of fairness translate across cultures? What is the relationship between human evolution and the development of morality? The collected chapters shed light on these questions and more to advance our understanding of these uniquely human concerns. Structured on an increasing scale, this volume begins by exploring issues of fairness, equity, and justice in a micro scale, such as the neural basis of fairness, and then progresses by considering these issues in individual, family, and finally cultural and societal arenas. Importantly, contributors are drawn from fields as diverse as anthropology, neuroscience, behavioral economics, bioethics, and psychology. Thus, the chapters provide added value and insights when read collectively, with the ultimate goal of enhancing the distinct disciplines as they investigate similar research questions about prosociality. In addition, particular attention is given to experimental research approaches and policy implications for some of society's most pressing issues, such as allocation of scarce medical resources and moral development of children. Thought-provoking and informative, Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Fairness, Equity, and Justice is a valuable read for public policy makers, anthropologists, ethicists, psychologists, neuroscientists, and all those interested in these questions about the essence of human nature.
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
170
Index
index present
LC call number
BJ1533.F2
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Li, Meng
  • Tracer, David P.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fairness
  • Equity
  • Justice
Label
Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice, Meng Li, David P. Tracer, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contributors; Chapter 1: An Introduction and Guide to the Volume; Theoretical Considerations: Homo economicus and the Axiom of Selfishness; Beyond Selfishness: Fairness, Equity, and Justice; Why an Interdisciplinary Perspective?; Guide to the Volume; References; Chapter 2: The Neural Basis of Fairness; Introduction; Trading-Off Self-Interest Versus the Greater Good; Monitoring (Un)fairness: The Role of the Anterior Insula; Conflict Monitoring and Cognitive Control in Economic Games; Fairness as Reward; The Link Between Theory of Mind and Fairness
  • Influencing Fairness Using Neuropharmacology Conclusion; References; Chapter 3: The Evolution of Moral Development; The Evolution of Moral Development; Human Moral Psychology; The Evolution of Morality, Especially Fairness; The Development of Morality, Especially Fairness; Infant Social Evaluation; The Emergence of Costly Fairness Behavior; Proximate Mechanisms; Implications and Future Directions; Implications for Cross-Cultural Research; Implications for Nonhuman Research; Future Directions for the Development of Fairness; References
  • Chapter 4: Public Preferences About Fairness and the Ethics of Allocating Scarce Medical Interventions Introduction; Normative Versus Empirical Methodologies; Ethical Principles for Fairly Allocating Scarce Medical Resources; Public Attitudes Regarding the Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources; How Are Public Attitudes Relevant to Ethical Questions?; Public Attitudes as an Answer to the Normative Question: Relativism; Expert Attitudes as an Answer to the Normative Question: Scientism; Public Attitudes as an Entry Point for Moral Inquiry
  • How Are Public Attitudes Relevant to the Implementation of Allocation Systems? Public Preferences as Constraints on Justice; Public Attitudes as Constraints on Implementation: Public Reason; Public Preferences as Implementation Constraints: Real-World Implementability; How Ethics Can Inform Social-Scientific Research on Fairness; Qualitative Research and the Elucidation of Normative Justifications; Quantitative Research and Question Wording; Conclusion; References; Chapter 5: Equality by Principle, Efficiency by Practice: How Policy Description Affects Allocation Preference
  • Study 1: Recipient Age Study 1A: Prioritizing Young vs. Equality; Methods; Results; Study 1B: "Years-Left" Metric vs. Equality; Method; Results; Discussion; Study 2: Replication in Recipient Age; Study 2A; Methods; Results; Study 2B; Method; Results; Discussion; Study 3: Waiting Time; Method; Results ; Discussion; Study 4: The Role of Numbers; Methods; Results; Discussion; General Discussion; References; Chapter 6: Resource Allocation Decisions: When Do We Sacrifice Efficiency in the Name of Equity?; On Equity; Equity-Efficiency Conflict; Conclusion; References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319589930
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reformatting quality
preservation
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
on1004377927
Label
Interdisciplinary perspectives on fairness, equity, and justice, Meng Li, David P. Tracer, editors
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Contributors; Chapter 1: An Introduction and Guide to the Volume; Theoretical Considerations: Homo economicus and the Axiom of Selfishness; Beyond Selfishness: Fairness, Equity, and Justice; Why an Interdisciplinary Perspective?; Guide to the Volume; References; Chapter 2: The Neural Basis of Fairness; Introduction; Trading-Off Self-Interest Versus the Greater Good; Monitoring (Un)fairness: The Role of the Anterior Insula; Conflict Monitoring and Cognitive Control in Economic Games; Fairness as Reward; The Link Between Theory of Mind and Fairness
  • Influencing Fairness Using Neuropharmacology Conclusion; References; Chapter 3: The Evolution of Moral Development; The Evolution of Moral Development; Human Moral Psychology; The Evolution of Morality, Especially Fairness; The Development of Morality, Especially Fairness; Infant Social Evaluation; The Emergence of Costly Fairness Behavior; Proximate Mechanisms; Implications and Future Directions; Implications for Cross-Cultural Research; Implications for Nonhuman Research; Future Directions for the Development of Fairness; References
  • Chapter 4: Public Preferences About Fairness and the Ethics of Allocating Scarce Medical Interventions Introduction; Normative Versus Empirical Methodologies; Ethical Principles for Fairly Allocating Scarce Medical Resources; Public Attitudes Regarding the Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources; How Are Public Attitudes Relevant to Ethical Questions?; Public Attitudes as an Answer to the Normative Question: Relativism; Expert Attitudes as an Answer to the Normative Question: Scientism; Public Attitudes as an Entry Point for Moral Inquiry
  • How Are Public Attitudes Relevant to the Implementation of Allocation Systems? Public Preferences as Constraints on Justice; Public Attitudes as Constraints on Implementation: Public Reason; Public Preferences as Implementation Constraints: Real-World Implementability; How Ethics Can Inform Social-Scientific Research on Fairness; Qualitative Research and the Elucidation of Normative Justifications; Quantitative Research and Question Wording; Conclusion; References; Chapter 5: Equality by Principle, Efficiency by Practice: How Policy Description Affects Allocation Preference
  • Study 1: Recipient Age Study 1A: Prioritizing Young vs. Equality; Methods; Results; Study 1B: "Years-Left" Metric vs. Equality; Method; Results; Discussion; Study 2: Replication in Recipient Age; Study 2A; Methods; Results; Study 2B; Method; Results; Discussion; Study 3: Waiting Time; Method; Results ; Discussion; Study 4: The Role of Numbers; Methods; Results; Discussion; General Discussion; References; Chapter 6: Resource Allocation Decisions: When Do We Sacrifice Efficiency in the Name of Equity?; On Equity; Equity-Efficiency Conflict; Conclusion; References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319589930
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reformatting quality
preservation
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
on1004377927

Library Locations

Processing Feedback ...