Coverart for item
The Resource Interfacial science : an introduction, Geoffrey Barnes, Ian Gentle

Interfacial science : an introduction, Geoffrey Barnes, Ian Gentle

Label
Interfacial science : an introduction
Title
Interfacial science
Title remainder
an introduction
Statement of responsibility
Geoffrey Barnes, Ian Gentle
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Interfacial science impacts on our lives in diverse and surprising ways. Without it, we would face bubble bath without the bubbles, detergents which don't clean, cappuccinos without the froth. It has also fuelled some of the most ground-breaking and thought-provoking advances in research in recent times, from biosciences to nanotechnology. Introduction to Interfacial Science offers an engaging insight into the study of the physical and chemical properties of interfaces, how they behave, why they behave as they do, and how this behaviour can be harnessed and exploited in novel and exciting ways."--Publisher's website
Cataloging source
StDuBDS
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Barnes, Geoffrey
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QC173.4.I57
LC item number
G48 2011
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1960-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Gentle, Ian
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Interfaces (Physical sciences)
  • Surface chemistry
Target audience
specialized
Label
Interfacial science : an introduction, Geoffrey Barnes, Ian Gentle
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Previous ed.: 2005
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction
  • 3.3.
  • Adsorption
  • 3.3.1.
  • Adsorption and the dividing surface
  • 3.3.2.
  • Conventions for the dividing surface
  • 3.3.3.
  • Adsorption isotherms
  • 3.4.
  • Thermodynamic properties of interfaces
  • 1.2.2.
  • 3.4.1.
  • Mechanical work
  • 3.4.2.
  • Internal energy and enthalpy
  • 3.4.3.
  • Gibbs free energy
  • 3.5.
  • Surface excess quantities
  • 3.6.
  • Measurement of adsorption
  • Types of interface
  • 3.6.1.
  • Adsorption from concentration change
  • 3.6.2.
  • Adsorption from surface analysis
  • 3.6.3.
  • Adsorption from surface tension change -- the Gibbs adsorption Isotherm
  • 3.7.
  • Adsorption from solutions
  • 3.8.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 1.2.3.
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 4
  • The gas -- liquid interface: adsorption, films and foams, aerosols
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Measurement of equilibrium adsorption
  • Defining the interfacial region
  • 4.2.1.
  • Surface tension measurement
  • 4.2.2.
  • Surface analysis
  • 4.3.
  • Observation of adsorption kinetics
  • 4.3.1.
  • Adsorption at freshly formed Interfaces
  • 4.3.2.
  • Surface waves
  • 1.3.
  • 4.4.
  • Adsorption of non-ionized solutes
  • 4.4.1.
  • Effects of solute concentration on the surface tension
  • 4.4.2.
  • Szyszkowski -- Langmuir adsorption
  • 4.4.3.
  • Equations of state
  • 4.4.4.
  • Negative adsorption
  • Stable interfaces
  • 4.4.5.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 4.5.
  • Adsorption of ionized solutes
  • 4.6.
  • Adsorption of surfactants
  • 4.6.1.
  • Molecular structure of surfactants
  • 4.6.2.
  • The surface tension of surfactant solutions
  • 1.4.
  • 4.6.3.
  • Adsorption of surfactants
  • 4.7.
  • Micelles
  • 4.7.1.
  • Properties of surfactant solutions
  • 4.7.2.
  • Molecular requirements for micelles
  • 4.7.3.
  • Formation of aggregates
  • Key concepts
  • 4.7.4.
  • Micelle structure
  • 4.7.5.
  • Solubilization
  • 4.7.6.
  • Factors affecting the cmc
  • 4.7.7.
  • Impurity effects
  • 4.8.
  • Applications of surfactants
  • 1.4.1.
  • 4.8.1.
  • Wetting
  • 4.8.2.
  • Detergency
  • 4.8.3.
  • Water repulsion
  • 4.8.4.
  • Emulsification
  • 4.8.5.
  • Froth flotation in ore treatment
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Surface tension and surface pressure
  • 4.8.6.
  • Oil recovery
  • 4.8.7.
  • Membrane disruption
  • 4.9.
  • Films and foams
  • 4.9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.9.2.
  • Film tension
  • 1.4.2.
  • 4.9.3.
  • Permeability to gases
  • 4.9.4.
  • Foam formation and stability
  • 4.9.5.
  • The Plateau border
  • 4.9.6.
  • Bubble shape in foams
  • 4.9.7.
  • Foam Inhibition
  • Wetting
  • 4.10.
  • The Marangoni effect
  • 4.11.
  • Aerosols
  • 4.11.1.
  • Occurrence
  • 4.11.2.
  • Formation
  • 4.11.3.
  • Properties of liquid aerosols
  • 1.4.3.
  • 4.11.4.
  • Verification of the Kelvin equation using an aerosol
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 5
  • Insoluble monolayers and Langmuir -- Blodgett films
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • Adsorption
  • 5.2.
  • Formation and handling of floating monolayers
  • 5.2.1.
  • Molecular requirements
  • 5.2.2.
  • Spreading
  • 5.2.3.
  • The surface film balance
  • 5.2.4.
  • Circular troughs
  • 1.4.4.
  • 5.2.5.
  • Surface film balances for the oil -- water interface
  • 5.3.
  • Surface pressure -- area relationships
  • 5.4.
  • Deposition of Langmuir -- Blodgett films
  • 5.5.
  • The study of film structure
  • 5.5.1.
  • The surface film balance
  • Emulsions
  • 5.5.2.
  • Surface potential
  • 5.5.3.
  • Surface viscosity
  • 5.5.4.
  • X-ray scattering techniques
  • 5.5.5.
  • Neutron scattering
  • 5.5.6.
  • Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy
  • 1.4.5.
  • 5.5.7.
  • Electron diffraction
  • 5.5.8.
  • Electron microscopy
  • 5.5.9.
  • Ellipsometry
  • 5.5.10.
  • Brewster angle and fluorescence microscopy
  • 5.5.11.
  • Scanning probe microscopy
  • Colloids
  • 5.5.12.
  • Miscellaneous techniques for solid surfaces
  • 5.6.
  • The structure and properties of floating monolayers
  • 5.6.1.
  • The principal monolayer phases
  • 5.6.2.
  • Phase transitions
  • 5.6.3.
  • Equilibrium spreading pressure
  • 1.4.6.
  • 5.6.4.
  • Monolayer collapse
  • 5.6.5.
  • Polymer monolayers
  • 5.7.
  • Interactions in monolayers
  • 5.7.1.
  • Two water-insoluble components
  • 5.7.2.
  • Penetration of monolayers by soluble surfactants
  • ch. 1
  • Membranes
  • 5.7.3.
  • Reactions in monolayers
  • 5.8.
  • The structure of LB films
  • 5.9.
  • Applications
  • 5.9.1.
  • Spread monolayers
  • 5.9.2.
  • LB films
  • 1.5.
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 6
  • The liquid -- liquid interface: emulsions; membranes
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.2.
  • Emulsions
  • Organization of the book
  • 6.2.1.
  • The formation of emulsions
  • 6.2.2.
  • Emulsion type
  • 6.2.3.
  • Size distribution
  • 6.2.4.
  • Emulsion stability
  • 6.2.5.
  • Emulsion rheology
  • Further Reading
  • 6.3.
  • Emulsion stability and selection of the emulsifier
  • 6.3.1.
  • Early theories
  • 6.3.2.
  • Electrical aspects of emulsion stability
  • 6.3.3.
  • Steric stabilization
  • 6.3.4.
  • Stabilization by solid particles
  • The literature of interfacial science
  • 6.3.5.
  • Emulsifiers and the HLB system
  • 6.4.
  • Micro-emulsions
  • 6.5.
  • Emulsion polymerization
  • 6.6.
  • Liquid -- liquid extraction
  • 6.7.
  • Membranes
  • Chapter references
  • 6.7.1.
  • Artificial membranes
  • 6.7.2.
  • Black lipid membranes (BLMs)
  • 6.7.3.
  • Self-assembled membranes
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • References
  • ch. 7
  • The surfaces of solids
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Surfaces of single crystals
  • 7.2.1.
  • Miller indices
  • 7.2.2.
  • Surface restructuring
  • Exercises
  • 7.3.
  • Techniques for studying solid surfaces
  • 7.3.1.
  • Spectroscopic methods
  • 7.3.2.
  • Diffraction methods
  • 7.3.3.
  • Surface plasmon resonance
  • 7.3.4.
  • Scanning probe techniques
  • ch. 2
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch
  • Capillarity and the mechanics of surfaces
  • Introduction
  • 2.1.
  • Surface tension and work
  • 2.1.1.
  • Definition of surface tension
  • 2.1.2.
  • Work of extension
  • 2.1.3.
  • Contact angle, wetting, and spreading
  • 2.1.4.
  • The surface of tension
  • 1.1.
  • 2.1.5.
  • Work of adhesion and cohesion
  • 2.2.
  • Measurement of surface tension
  • 2.2.1.
  • Wilhelmy plate
  • 2.2.2.
  • Capillary rise
  • 2.2.3.
  • Drop weight or volume
  • The importance of interfaces
  • 2.2.4.
  • Maximum bubble pressure
  • 2.2.5.
  • Sessile and pendant drops
  • 2.6.6.
  • Micropipette
  • 2.2.7.
  • Indicator oils
  • 2.3.
  • The Laplace equation
  • 1.2.
  • 2.3.1.
  • Applications of the Laplace equation
  • 2.4.
  • The Kelvin equation
  • 2.4.1.
  • Consequences of the Kelvin equation
  • 2.4.2.
  • Verification of the Kelvin equation
  • 2.5.
  • The surface tension of pure liquids
  • Surfaces and interfaces
  • 2.5.1.
  • Effect of temperature on surface tension
  • 2.5.2.
  • The surface tension of liquids
  • 2.5.3.
  • The hydrophobic -- hydrophilic interaction
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • 1.2.1.
  • ch. 3
  • Adsorption and the thermodynamics of surfaces
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Models of the interface
  • 3.2.1.
  • The surface phase approach
  • 3.2.2.
  • The surface excess properties approach
  • 8.3.
  • 9.7.1.
  • Lyophilic and lyophobic colloids
  • 9.7.2.
  • Preparation of colloidal dispersions
  • 9.8.
  • The properties of colloidal dispersions
  • 9.8.1.
  • Brownian motion
  • 9.8.2.
  • Light scattering
  • Measurement of gas adsorption
  • 9.8.3.
  • Measurement of particle size
  • 9.8.4.
  • Measurement of particle charge
  • 9.8.5.
  • Colloid stability
  • 9.9.
  • Coagulation of lyophobic colloids by electrolytes
  • 9.9.1.
  • Surface charge
  • 8.3.1.
  • 9.9.2.
  • The Schulze -- Hardy rule
  • 9.9.3.
  • Stability of colloidal dispersions -- DLVO theory
  • 9.9.4.
  • Kinetics of coagulation
  • 9.9.5.
  • Overview and limitations of DLVO theory
  • 9.9.6.
  • The measurement of interparticle forces
  • Pressure/volume methods
  • 9.10.
  • Solvation effects in colloid interactions
  • 8.3.2.
  • Flow methods
  • 8.3.3.
  • Gravimetric methods
  • 8.4.
  • Adsorption isotherms
  • 8
  • 8.4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.4.2.
  • Classification of adsorption isotherms
  • 8.5.
  • Isotherm equations
  • 8.5.1.
  • The Langmuir adsorption equation
  • 8.5.2.
  • The BET equation
  • The gas -- solid interface: adsorption; catalysis
  • 8.5.3.
  • The BET equation for limited adsorption
  • 8.5.4.
  • The Freundlich and Temkin isotherms
  • 8.5.5.
  • Other isotherm equations
  • 8.6.
  • Capillary condensation
  • 8.7.
  • Structure of the adsorbed layer
  • 8.1.
  • 8.7.1.
  • Initial stages of adsorption
  • 8.7.2.
  • Multilayer adsorption
  • 8.8.
  • Chemisorption
  • 8.8.1.
  • Adsorption isotherms for chemisorption
  • 8.8.2.
  • Specificity of chemisorption
  • Introduction
  • 8.8.3.
  • Surface restructuring through chemisorption
  • 8.9.
  • The enthalpy of adsorption
  • 8.10.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 8.10.1.
  • Kinetics of physical adsorption
  • 8.10.2.
  • Kinetics of chemisorption
  • 8.2.
  • 8.11.
  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • 8.11.1.
  • Overview of heterogeneous catalysis
  • 8.11.2.
  • Adsorption of reactants, step (2)
  • 8.11.3.
  • Reaction within the adsorbed layer, step (3)
  • 8.11.4.
  • Desorption of products, step (4)
  • Physical and chemical adsorption
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 9
  • The liquid -- solid interface: adsorption; colloids
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • Measurement of adsorption
  • 8.2.1.
  • 9.3.
  • Adsorption at low solute concentrations
  • 9.4.
  • Adsorption at higher solute concentrations
  • 9.4.1.
  • The composite adsorption isotherm
  • 9.5.
  • Adsorption of ions and the electrical double layer
  • 9.5.1.
  • Helmholtz model
  • Comparing physical and chemical adsorption
  • 9.5.2.
  • Gouy -- Chapman model
  • 9.5.3.
  • The Stern model
  • 9.5.4.
  • Summary
  • 9.6.
  • Electrokinetics
  • 9.7.
  • Colloidal dispersions
  • Nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • 9.12.
  • Clay minerals
  • 9.12.1.
  • Structure of clay minerals
  • 9.12.2.
  • Swelling of clay minerals
  • 9.12.3.
  • Clay mineral dispersions
  • 9.13.
  • Note continued:
  • Self-assembled films
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 10
  • Biological interfaces
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • 9.10.1.
  • Membrane materials
  • 10.2.1.
  • Phospholipids
  • 10.2.2.
  • Cholesterol
  • 10.2.3.
  • Phospholipid + cholesterol
  • 10.2.4.
  • Membrane proteins
  • 10.3.
  • Solvent structuring in particle interactions
  • Bilayers
  • 10.3.1.
  • Structure
  • 10.3.2.
  • Properties
  • 10.4.
  • Vesicles and liposomes
  • 10.4.1.
  • Phospholipid self-assembly
  • 10.4.2.
  • 9.10.2.
  • Permeability of vesicles
  • 10.4.3.
  • Electron microscopy
  • 10.4.4.
  • Applications
  • 10.5.
  • Cell membranes
  • 10.5.1.
  • Composition
  • 10.5.2.
  • Steric stabilization of colloids
  • Structure
  • 10.5.3.
  • Function: selective permeability
  • 10.5.4.
  • Surfactant effects
  • 10.6.
  • Molecular recognition
  • 10.6.1.
  • Nature of the interaction
  • 10.6.2.
  • 9.11.
  • The association constant
  • 10.6.3.
  • Application of surface techniques
  • 10.7.
  • Lung surfactant
  • 10.7.1.
  • Natural lung surfactant: composition and function
  • 10.7.2.
  • Lung surfactant production and life cycle
  • 10.7.3.
  • Nanoparticles
  • Surface activity of lung surfactant
  • 10.8.
  • Aerosols in the respiratory tract
  • 10.8.1.
  • The respiratory system and atmospheric pollution
  • 10.8.2.
  • The therapeutic use of aerosols
  • 10.9.
  • Adhesion of bacteria to surfaces
  • Summary
  • 9.11.1.
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
Control code
09DAW17745495
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
xxii, 326 p.
Isbn
9780199571185
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill.
Label
Interfacial science : an introduction, Geoffrey Barnes, Ian Gentle
Publication
Note
Previous ed.: 2005
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Introduction
  • 3.3.
  • Adsorption
  • 3.3.1.
  • Adsorption and the dividing surface
  • 3.3.2.
  • Conventions for the dividing surface
  • 3.3.3.
  • Adsorption isotherms
  • 3.4.
  • Thermodynamic properties of interfaces
  • 1.2.2.
  • 3.4.1.
  • Mechanical work
  • 3.4.2.
  • Internal energy and enthalpy
  • 3.4.3.
  • Gibbs free energy
  • 3.5.
  • Surface excess quantities
  • 3.6.
  • Measurement of adsorption
  • Types of interface
  • 3.6.1.
  • Adsorption from concentration change
  • 3.6.2.
  • Adsorption from surface analysis
  • 3.6.3.
  • Adsorption from surface tension change -- the Gibbs adsorption Isotherm
  • 3.7.
  • Adsorption from solutions
  • 3.8.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 1.2.3.
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 4
  • The gas -- liquid interface: adsorption, films and foams, aerosols
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Measurement of equilibrium adsorption
  • Defining the interfacial region
  • 4.2.1.
  • Surface tension measurement
  • 4.2.2.
  • Surface analysis
  • 4.3.
  • Observation of adsorption kinetics
  • 4.3.1.
  • Adsorption at freshly formed Interfaces
  • 4.3.2.
  • Surface waves
  • 1.3.
  • 4.4.
  • Adsorption of non-ionized solutes
  • 4.4.1.
  • Effects of solute concentration on the surface tension
  • 4.4.2.
  • Szyszkowski -- Langmuir adsorption
  • 4.4.3.
  • Equations of state
  • 4.4.4.
  • Negative adsorption
  • Stable interfaces
  • 4.4.5.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 4.5.
  • Adsorption of ionized solutes
  • 4.6.
  • Adsorption of surfactants
  • 4.6.1.
  • Molecular structure of surfactants
  • 4.6.2.
  • The surface tension of surfactant solutions
  • 1.4.
  • 4.6.3.
  • Adsorption of surfactants
  • 4.7.
  • Micelles
  • 4.7.1.
  • Properties of surfactant solutions
  • 4.7.2.
  • Molecular requirements for micelles
  • 4.7.3.
  • Formation of aggregates
  • Key concepts
  • 4.7.4.
  • Micelle structure
  • 4.7.5.
  • Solubilization
  • 4.7.6.
  • Factors affecting the cmc
  • 4.7.7.
  • Impurity effects
  • 4.8.
  • Applications of surfactants
  • 1.4.1.
  • 4.8.1.
  • Wetting
  • 4.8.2.
  • Detergency
  • 4.8.3.
  • Water repulsion
  • 4.8.4.
  • Emulsification
  • 4.8.5.
  • Froth flotation in ore treatment
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • Surface tension and surface pressure
  • 4.8.6.
  • Oil recovery
  • 4.8.7.
  • Membrane disruption
  • 4.9.
  • Films and foams
  • 4.9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.9.2.
  • Film tension
  • 1.4.2.
  • 4.9.3.
  • Permeability to gases
  • 4.9.4.
  • Foam formation and stability
  • 4.9.5.
  • The Plateau border
  • 4.9.6.
  • Bubble shape in foams
  • 4.9.7.
  • Foam Inhibition
  • Wetting
  • 4.10.
  • The Marangoni effect
  • 4.11.
  • Aerosols
  • 4.11.1.
  • Occurrence
  • 4.11.2.
  • Formation
  • 4.11.3.
  • Properties of liquid aerosols
  • 1.4.3.
  • 4.11.4.
  • Verification of the Kelvin equation using an aerosol
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 5
  • Insoluble monolayers and Langmuir -- Blodgett films
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • Adsorption
  • 5.2.
  • Formation and handling of floating monolayers
  • 5.2.1.
  • Molecular requirements
  • 5.2.2.
  • Spreading
  • 5.2.3.
  • The surface film balance
  • 5.2.4.
  • Circular troughs
  • 1.4.4.
  • 5.2.5.
  • Surface film balances for the oil -- water interface
  • 5.3.
  • Surface pressure -- area relationships
  • 5.4.
  • Deposition of Langmuir -- Blodgett films
  • 5.5.
  • The study of film structure
  • 5.5.1.
  • The surface film balance
  • Emulsions
  • 5.5.2.
  • Surface potential
  • 5.5.3.
  • Surface viscosity
  • 5.5.4.
  • X-ray scattering techniques
  • 5.5.5.
  • Neutron scattering
  • 5.5.6.
  • Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy
  • 1.4.5.
  • 5.5.7.
  • Electron diffraction
  • 5.5.8.
  • Electron microscopy
  • 5.5.9.
  • Ellipsometry
  • 5.5.10.
  • Brewster angle and fluorescence microscopy
  • 5.5.11.
  • Scanning probe microscopy
  • Colloids
  • 5.5.12.
  • Miscellaneous techniques for solid surfaces
  • 5.6.
  • The structure and properties of floating monolayers
  • 5.6.1.
  • The principal monolayer phases
  • 5.6.2.
  • Phase transitions
  • 5.6.3.
  • Equilibrium spreading pressure
  • 1.4.6.
  • 5.6.4.
  • Monolayer collapse
  • 5.6.5.
  • Polymer monolayers
  • 5.7.
  • Interactions in monolayers
  • 5.7.1.
  • Two water-insoluble components
  • 5.7.2.
  • Penetration of monolayers by soluble surfactants
  • ch. 1
  • Membranes
  • 5.7.3.
  • Reactions in monolayers
  • 5.8.
  • The structure of LB films
  • 5.9.
  • Applications
  • 5.9.1.
  • Spread monolayers
  • 5.9.2.
  • LB films
  • 1.5.
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 6
  • The liquid -- liquid interface: emulsions; membranes
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.2.
  • Emulsions
  • Organization of the book
  • 6.2.1.
  • The formation of emulsions
  • 6.2.2.
  • Emulsion type
  • 6.2.3.
  • Size distribution
  • 6.2.4.
  • Emulsion stability
  • 6.2.5.
  • Emulsion rheology
  • Further Reading
  • 6.3.
  • Emulsion stability and selection of the emulsifier
  • 6.3.1.
  • Early theories
  • 6.3.2.
  • Electrical aspects of emulsion stability
  • 6.3.3.
  • Steric stabilization
  • 6.3.4.
  • Stabilization by solid particles
  • The literature of interfacial science
  • 6.3.5.
  • Emulsifiers and the HLB system
  • 6.4.
  • Micro-emulsions
  • 6.5.
  • Emulsion polymerization
  • 6.6.
  • Liquid -- liquid extraction
  • 6.7.
  • Membranes
  • Chapter references
  • 6.7.1.
  • Artificial membranes
  • 6.7.2.
  • Black lipid membranes (BLMs)
  • 6.7.3.
  • Self-assembled membranes
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • References
  • ch. 7
  • The surfaces of solids
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • Surfaces of single crystals
  • 7.2.1.
  • Miller indices
  • 7.2.2.
  • Surface restructuring
  • Exercises
  • 7.3.
  • Techniques for studying solid surfaces
  • 7.3.1.
  • Spectroscopic methods
  • 7.3.2.
  • Diffraction methods
  • 7.3.3.
  • Surface plasmon resonance
  • 7.3.4.
  • Scanning probe techniques
  • ch. 2
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch
  • Capillarity and the mechanics of surfaces
  • Introduction
  • 2.1.
  • Surface tension and work
  • 2.1.1.
  • Definition of surface tension
  • 2.1.2.
  • Work of extension
  • 2.1.3.
  • Contact angle, wetting, and spreading
  • 2.1.4.
  • The surface of tension
  • 1.1.
  • 2.1.5.
  • Work of adhesion and cohesion
  • 2.2.
  • Measurement of surface tension
  • 2.2.1.
  • Wilhelmy plate
  • 2.2.2.
  • Capillary rise
  • 2.2.3.
  • Drop weight or volume
  • The importance of interfaces
  • 2.2.4.
  • Maximum bubble pressure
  • 2.2.5.
  • Sessile and pendant drops
  • 2.6.6.
  • Micropipette
  • 2.2.7.
  • Indicator oils
  • 2.3.
  • The Laplace equation
  • 1.2.
  • 2.3.1.
  • Applications of the Laplace equation
  • 2.4.
  • The Kelvin equation
  • 2.4.1.
  • Consequences of the Kelvin equation
  • 2.4.2.
  • Verification of the Kelvin equation
  • 2.5.
  • The surface tension of pure liquids
  • Surfaces and interfaces
  • 2.5.1.
  • Effect of temperature on surface tension
  • 2.5.2.
  • The surface tension of liquids
  • 2.5.3.
  • The hydrophobic -- hydrophilic interaction
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • 1.2.1.
  • ch. 3
  • Adsorption and the thermodynamics of surfaces
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Models of the interface
  • 3.2.1.
  • The surface phase approach
  • 3.2.2.
  • The surface excess properties approach
  • 8.3.
  • 9.7.1.
  • Lyophilic and lyophobic colloids
  • 9.7.2.
  • Preparation of colloidal dispersions
  • 9.8.
  • The properties of colloidal dispersions
  • 9.8.1.
  • Brownian motion
  • 9.8.2.
  • Light scattering
  • Measurement of gas adsorption
  • 9.8.3.
  • Measurement of particle size
  • 9.8.4.
  • Measurement of particle charge
  • 9.8.5.
  • Colloid stability
  • 9.9.
  • Coagulation of lyophobic colloids by electrolytes
  • 9.9.1.
  • Surface charge
  • 8.3.1.
  • 9.9.2.
  • The Schulze -- Hardy rule
  • 9.9.3.
  • Stability of colloidal dispersions -- DLVO theory
  • 9.9.4.
  • Kinetics of coagulation
  • 9.9.5.
  • Overview and limitations of DLVO theory
  • 9.9.6.
  • The measurement of interparticle forces
  • Pressure/volume methods
  • 9.10.
  • Solvation effects in colloid interactions
  • 8.3.2.
  • Flow methods
  • 8.3.3.
  • Gravimetric methods
  • 8.4.
  • Adsorption isotherms
  • 8
  • 8.4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.4.2.
  • Classification of adsorption isotherms
  • 8.5.
  • Isotherm equations
  • 8.5.1.
  • The Langmuir adsorption equation
  • 8.5.2.
  • The BET equation
  • The gas -- solid interface: adsorption; catalysis
  • 8.5.3.
  • The BET equation for limited adsorption
  • 8.5.4.
  • The Freundlich and Temkin isotherms
  • 8.5.5.
  • Other isotherm equations
  • 8.6.
  • Capillary condensation
  • 8.7.
  • Structure of the adsorbed layer
  • 8.1.
  • 8.7.1.
  • Initial stages of adsorption
  • 8.7.2.
  • Multilayer adsorption
  • 8.8.
  • Chemisorption
  • 8.8.1.
  • Adsorption isotherms for chemisorption
  • 8.8.2.
  • Specificity of chemisorption
  • Introduction
  • 8.8.3.
  • Surface restructuring through chemisorption
  • 8.9.
  • The enthalpy of adsorption
  • 8.10.
  • Kinetics of adsorption
  • 8.10.1.
  • Kinetics of physical adsorption
  • 8.10.2.
  • Kinetics of chemisorption
  • 8.2.
  • 8.11.
  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • 8.11.1.
  • Overview of heterogeneous catalysis
  • 8.11.2.
  • Adsorption of reactants, step (2)
  • 8.11.3.
  • Reaction within the adsorbed layer, step (3)
  • 8.11.4.
  • Desorption of products, step (4)
  • Physical and chemical adsorption
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 9
  • The liquid -- solid interface: adsorption; colloids
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • Measurement of adsorption
  • 8.2.1.
  • 9.3.
  • Adsorption at low solute concentrations
  • 9.4.
  • Adsorption at higher solute concentrations
  • 9.4.1.
  • The composite adsorption isotherm
  • 9.5.
  • Adsorption of ions and the electrical double layer
  • 9.5.1.
  • Helmholtz model
  • Comparing physical and chemical adsorption
  • 9.5.2.
  • Gouy -- Chapman model
  • 9.5.3.
  • The Stern model
  • 9.5.4.
  • Summary
  • 9.6.
  • Electrokinetics
  • 9.7.
  • Colloidal dispersions
  • Nanoscience and nanotechnology
  • 9.12.
  • Clay minerals
  • 9.12.1.
  • Structure of clay minerals
  • 9.12.2.
  • Swelling of clay minerals
  • 9.12.3.
  • Clay mineral dispersions
  • 9.13.
  • Note continued:
  • Self-assembled films
  • Summary
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
  • ch. 10
  • Biological interfaces
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • 9.10.1.
  • Membrane materials
  • 10.2.1.
  • Phospholipids
  • 10.2.2.
  • Cholesterol
  • 10.2.3.
  • Phospholipid + cholesterol
  • 10.2.4.
  • Membrane proteins
  • 10.3.
  • Solvent structuring in particle interactions
  • Bilayers
  • 10.3.1.
  • Structure
  • 10.3.2.
  • Properties
  • 10.4.
  • Vesicles and liposomes
  • 10.4.1.
  • Phospholipid self-assembly
  • 10.4.2.
  • 9.10.2.
  • Permeability of vesicles
  • 10.4.3.
  • Electron microscopy
  • 10.4.4.
  • Applications
  • 10.5.
  • Cell membranes
  • 10.5.1.
  • Composition
  • 10.5.2.
  • Steric stabilization of colloids
  • Structure
  • 10.5.3.
  • Function: selective permeability
  • 10.5.4.
  • Surfactant effects
  • 10.6.
  • Molecular recognition
  • 10.6.1.
  • Nature of the interaction
  • 10.6.2.
  • 9.11.
  • The association constant
  • 10.6.3.
  • Application of surface techniques
  • 10.7.
  • Lung surfactant
  • 10.7.1.
  • Natural lung surfactant: composition and function
  • 10.7.2.
  • Lung surfactant production and life cycle
  • 10.7.3.
  • Nanoparticles
  • Surface activity of lung surfactant
  • 10.8.
  • Aerosols in the respiratory tract
  • 10.8.1.
  • The respiratory system and atmospheric pollution
  • 10.8.2.
  • The therapeutic use of aerosols
  • 10.9.
  • Adhesion of bacteria to surfaces
  • Summary
  • 9.11.1.
  • Further Reading
  • References
  • Exercises
Control code
09DAW17745495
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
xxii, 326 p.
Isbn
9780199571185
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill.

Library Locations

    • Harold Cohen LibraryBorrow it
      Ashton Street, Liverpool, L69 3DA, GB
      53.418074 -2.967913
Processing Feedback ...