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The Resource International climate change law, Daniel Bodansky, Jutta Brunnée, Lavanya Rajamani

International climate change law, Daniel Bodansky, Jutta Brunnée, Lavanya Rajamani

Label
International climate change law
Title
International climate change law
Statement of responsibility
Daniel Bodansky, Jutta Brunnée, Lavanya Rajamani
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
StDuBDS
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bodansky, Daniel
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Brunnée, Jutta
  • Rajamani, Lavanya
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Climatic changes
  • Environmental law, International
Label
International climate change law, Daniel Bodansky, Jutta Brunnée, Lavanya Rajamani
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Table of Case
  • Paris Agreement
  • Introduction
  • Oversight system (Articles 13, 14, and 15)
  • Transparency (Article 13)
  • Global stocktake (Article 14)
  • Implementation and Compliance Mechanism (Article 15)
  • Institutions (Articles 16-19)
  • Final clauses (Articles 20-28)
  • Next steps
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Legal form of the 2015 agreement
  • Legal character of the provisions in the 2015 agreement
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • The CBDRRC principle in the Paris Agreement
  • Operationalizing the CBDRRC principle in the Paris Agreement
  • Differentiation in mitigation
  • Differentiation in transparency
  • Differentiation in finance
  • Preamble
  • Purpose (Articles 2 and 4.1)
  • Mitigation (Article 4)
  • Obligations in relation to nationally determined contributions (NDCs)
  • Registering NDCs
  • Progression in NDCs
  • Ambition cycle
  • Market-based approaches (Article 6)
  • Adaptation (Article 7)
  • Loss and damage (Article 8)
  • Support (Articles 9, 10, and 11)
  • Finance
  • Financial commitments
  • Donor pool
  • Mobilization goal
  • Technology
  • Capacity-building
  • Climate Governance beyond the United Nations Climate Regime
  • Introduction
  • Select Bibliography
  • Multi-level climate governance
  • Public and private climate governance
  • Climate governance by other multilateral institutions
  • Bunker emissions
  • International Maritime Organization
  • International Civil Aviation Organization
  • Ozone-depleting substances
  • Black carbon and other short-lived climate forces
  • UN security Council
  • Informal political forums
  • Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate
  • G-8/G-20
  • Bilateral initiatives
  • Sub-national climate governance
  • Judicial governance
  • Functions of litigation
  • Source of law
  • Forum
  • Assessment
  • Polycetric governance of the carbon market
  • Polycentric governance and the UN climate change regime
  • Conclusion
  • Intersections between International Climate Change Law and Other Areas of International Law
  • Introduction
  • Climate change and human rights
  • Introduction
  • Distinguishing features of a human rights approach to climate change
  • Advantages and disadvantages of a human rights approach to climate change
  • Which human rights are affected by the impacts of climate change?
  • Extending the ambit of existing rights to address climate impacts
  • Recognizing a right to a healthy or clean environment
  • Nature of duties
  • Types of duties
  • Duty holders
  • Duty beneficiaries
  • Human rights implications of response measures
  • Human rights in the UN climate regime
  • Climate change, migration, and displacement
  • Introduction
  • Existing international protection
  • Internal displacement
  • Cross-border displacement
  • International refugee law
  • International human rights law
  • Law relating to statelessness
  • Addressing gaps in protection
  • Climate-induced displacement and migration in the UN climate regime
  • Climate change and trade
  • The World Trade Organization
  • GATT principles
  • Trade disciplines
  • Exceptions
  • The dispute settlement process
  • The relationship between trade rules and climate protection measures
  • Unilateral or multilateral measures?
  • Direct and indirect trade restrictions
  • The role of the 'likeness' standard
  • Criteria for assessing 'likeness'
  • Processes and production methods (PPMs) and 'likeness'
  • Trade-related climate measures
  • Border adjustments
  • Subsidies
  • Trade in the UN climate regime
  • Select Bibliography
  • Conclusion
  • The evolution of international climate change law: A brief recap
  • Distinctive features of international climate change law
  • Effectiveness of international climate change law
  • Looking ahead
  • Index
  • Table of International Instruments and National Legislation
  • List of Acronyms
  • Introduction
  • Climate change as an intractable policy challenge
  • Three perspectives on the climate change problem
  • Climate change as an environmental problem
  • Climate change as an economic problem
  • Climate change as an ethical problem
  • Demarcating international climate change law
  • The subject matter of international climate change law
  • Mitigation
  • Adaptation
  • Finance
  • Oversight
  • Recurring themes in the UN climate regime
  • Legal bindingness
  • Treaties
  • Decisions of parties
  • Political agreements
  • Architecture
  • Differentiation
  • The broader context for international climate change law
  • Select Bibliography
  • Climate Change and International Law
  • Introduction
  • The sources of international Law
  • Key principles of international environmental law
  • The no-harm rule and related principles
  • Harm preventions and due diligence
  • Procedural obligation
  • Prevention and precaution
  • Establishing state responsibility for violation of the no-harm rule
  • General considerations
  • Legal action for climate harm-some examples
  • Invoking state responsibility for harm to the global commons
  • Common concern and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities
  • Precation, sustainable development, and the intertemporal reach of international environmental law
  • Treaty-based approaches to environmental protection
  • Treaty development over time
  • The framework-protocol model
  • Institurionalization
  • Ongoing standard-setting processes
  • Treaty design to induce participation
  • Promotion of implementation and compliance
  • Emergence of the implementation and compliance focus
  • Modern multilateral environmental agreements and compliance
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Treaty-Based Law-Making: Rules, Tools, and Techniques
  • Introduction
  • Treaties and treaty-based law-making
  • What is a treaty?
  • Treaty negotiations
  • The pre-negotiation phase: issue, forum, and mandate
  • The negotiating process
  • Adoption, signature, ratification, and entry into forde of treaties
  • Treaty development
  • New treaties to supplement the framework
  • Amendments
  • Decisions of the parties
  • Political agreements
  • Ambiguity, interpretation, and subsequent practice
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Evolution of the United Nations Climate Regime
  • Introduction
  • Agenda-setting (1985-1990)
  • Constitutional phase: negotiation and entry into force of the FCCC (1990-1995)
  • Regulatory phase: negotiation and elaboration of the Kyoto protocol (1995-2005)
  • Second constitutional phase: negotiating the future climate regime (2005-2016)
  • Bali Action Plan
  • Copenhagen Accord
  • Cancun Agreements
  • Durban Platform and Doha Amendment
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • The Framework Convention on Climate Change
  • Introduction
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • Preamble, objective, and principles (Articles 2 and 3)
  • Preamble
  • Objective (Article 2)
  • Principles (Article 3)
  • Background
  • Principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities
  • Precaution and cost-effectiveness
  • Sustainable development
  • Supportive and open economic system
  • Commitments (Articles 4-6 and 12)
  • General commitments (Articles 4.1, 5, 6, and 12.1)
  • Mitigation (Articles 4.1(b)-(d) and 4.2)
  • Targets and timetables
  • Comprehensive approach
  • Joint implementation
  • Adaptation (Articles 4.1(b) and (e), 4.8, and 4.9)
  • Financial support (Articles 4.3 and 4.4)
  • Technology transfer (Article 4.5)
  • Transparency (Articles 4.1(a) and 12)
  • Institutions (Articles 7-11)
  • Conference of the Parties (Article 7)
  • Secretariat (Article 8)
  • Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (Article 9)
  • Subsidiary Body for Implementation (Article 10)
  • Financial mechanism (Articles 11 and 21.3)
  • Implementation and compliance mechanisms (Articles 7.2 and 12-14)
  • Overview
  • Reporting (Article 12)
  • International review (Article 7.2)
  • Multilateral consultative process to resolve questions regarding implementation (Article 13)
  • Dispute settlement (Article 14)
  • Final clauses (Articles 15-25)
  • Amendments, annexes, and protocols to the convention (Articles 15, 16, and 17)
  • Voting rights, signature, and ratification (Articles 18, 20, and 22)
  • Entry into force (Article 23)
  • Reservations and withdrawal (Articles 24 and 25)
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Kyoto Protocol
  • Introduction
  • The second and future commitment periods of the Kyoto Protocol
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • Differentiation between Annex I and non-Annex I parties
  • Differentiation within the category of Annex I parties
  • Voluntary commitments for developing countries
  • Preamble and definitions (Article 1)
  • Commitments (Articles 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, and 11)
  • General commitments
  • Specific commitments for Annex I and Annex II parties
  • Policies and measures (Article 2)
  • Banking
  • Mitigation targets and timetables (Article 3)
  • Legal character
  • Differentiated targets
  • Collective target
  • Base year
  • Assigned amount units
  • Sinks
  • Multi-year commitment period
  • Joint fulfillment
  • Financial support (Article 11)
  • Mechanisms (Articles 6, 12, and 17)
  • Joint implementation (Article 6)
  • Clean Development Mechanism (Article 12)
  • Additionality
  • Sustainable development
  • Project eligibility
  • Project types
  • Unilateral CDM
  • Programmatic CDM
  • Other project types
  • Equitable geographical distribution of CDM projects
  • Share of proceeds
  • Emissions trading (Article 17)
  • Outlook
  • Reporting, review, and compliance (Articles 5, 7, 8, and 18)
  • Reporting and review (Article 5, 7, and 8)
  • Compliance procedures and mechanisms
  • Context and goals
  • Triggers
  • The Compliance Committee and its process
  • The facilitative branch
  • The enforcement branch
  • Outlook
  • Institutions (Articles 13, 14, and 15)
  • Multilateral consultative process (Article 16)
  • Final clauses (Articles 19-28)
Control code
025749602
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxxix, 374 pages
Isbn
9780199664306
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Label
International climate change law, Daniel Bodansky, Jutta Brunnée, Lavanya Rajamani
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Table of Case
  • Paris Agreement
  • Introduction
  • Oversight system (Articles 13, 14, and 15)
  • Transparency (Article 13)
  • Global stocktake (Article 14)
  • Implementation and Compliance Mechanism (Article 15)
  • Institutions (Articles 16-19)
  • Final clauses (Articles 20-28)
  • Next steps
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Legal form of the 2015 agreement
  • Legal character of the provisions in the 2015 agreement
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • The CBDRRC principle in the Paris Agreement
  • Operationalizing the CBDRRC principle in the Paris Agreement
  • Differentiation in mitigation
  • Differentiation in transparency
  • Differentiation in finance
  • Preamble
  • Purpose (Articles 2 and 4.1)
  • Mitigation (Article 4)
  • Obligations in relation to nationally determined contributions (NDCs)
  • Registering NDCs
  • Progression in NDCs
  • Ambition cycle
  • Market-based approaches (Article 6)
  • Adaptation (Article 7)
  • Loss and damage (Article 8)
  • Support (Articles 9, 10, and 11)
  • Finance
  • Financial commitments
  • Donor pool
  • Mobilization goal
  • Technology
  • Capacity-building
  • Climate Governance beyond the United Nations Climate Regime
  • Introduction
  • Select Bibliography
  • Multi-level climate governance
  • Public and private climate governance
  • Climate governance by other multilateral institutions
  • Bunker emissions
  • International Maritime Organization
  • International Civil Aviation Organization
  • Ozone-depleting substances
  • Black carbon and other short-lived climate forces
  • UN security Council
  • Informal political forums
  • Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate
  • G-8/G-20
  • Bilateral initiatives
  • Sub-national climate governance
  • Judicial governance
  • Functions of litigation
  • Source of law
  • Forum
  • Assessment
  • Polycetric governance of the carbon market
  • Polycentric governance and the UN climate change regime
  • Conclusion
  • Intersections between International Climate Change Law and Other Areas of International Law
  • Introduction
  • Climate change and human rights
  • Introduction
  • Distinguishing features of a human rights approach to climate change
  • Advantages and disadvantages of a human rights approach to climate change
  • Which human rights are affected by the impacts of climate change?
  • Extending the ambit of existing rights to address climate impacts
  • Recognizing a right to a healthy or clean environment
  • Nature of duties
  • Types of duties
  • Duty holders
  • Duty beneficiaries
  • Human rights implications of response measures
  • Human rights in the UN climate regime
  • Climate change, migration, and displacement
  • Introduction
  • Existing international protection
  • Internal displacement
  • Cross-border displacement
  • International refugee law
  • International human rights law
  • Law relating to statelessness
  • Addressing gaps in protection
  • Climate-induced displacement and migration in the UN climate regime
  • Climate change and trade
  • The World Trade Organization
  • GATT principles
  • Trade disciplines
  • Exceptions
  • The dispute settlement process
  • The relationship between trade rules and climate protection measures
  • Unilateral or multilateral measures?
  • Direct and indirect trade restrictions
  • The role of the 'likeness' standard
  • Criteria for assessing 'likeness'
  • Processes and production methods (PPMs) and 'likeness'
  • Trade-related climate measures
  • Border adjustments
  • Subsidies
  • Trade in the UN climate regime
  • Select Bibliography
  • Conclusion
  • The evolution of international climate change law: A brief recap
  • Distinctive features of international climate change law
  • Effectiveness of international climate change law
  • Looking ahead
  • Index
  • Table of International Instruments and National Legislation
  • List of Acronyms
  • Introduction
  • Climate change as an intractable policy challenge
  • Three perspectives on the climate change problem
  • Climate change as an environmental problem
  • Climate change as an economic problem
  • Climate change as an ethical problem
  • Demarcating international climate change law
  • The subject matter of international climate change law
  • Mitigation
  • Adaptation
  • Finance
  • Oversight
  • Recurring themes in the UN climate regime
  • Legal bindingness
  • Treaties
  • Decisions of parties
  • Political agreements
  • Architecture
  • Differentiation
  • The broader context for international climate change law
  • Select Bibliography
  • Climate Change and International Law
  • Introduction
  • The sources of international Law
  • Key principles of international environmental law
  • The no-harm rule and related principles
  • Harm preventions and due diligence
  • Procedural obligation
  • Prevention and precaution
  • Establishing state responsibility for violation of the no-harm rule
  • General considerations
  • Legal action for climate harm-some examples
  • Invoking state responsibility for harm to the global commons
  • Common concern and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities
  • Precation, sustainable development, and the intertemporal reach of international environmental law
  • Treaty-based approaches to environmental protection
  • Treaty development over time
  • The framework-protocol model
  • Institurionalization
  • Ongoing standard-setting processes
  • Treaty design to induce participation
  • Promotion of implementation and compliance
  • Emergence of the implementation and compliance focus
  • Modern multilateral environmental agreements and compliance
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Treaty-Based Law-Making: Rules, Tools, and Techniques
  • Introduction
  • Treaties and treaty-based law-making
  • What is a treaty?
  • Treaty negotiations
  • The pre-negotiation phase: issue, forum, and mandate
  • The negotiating process
  • Adoption, signature, ratification, and entry into forde of treaties
  • Treaty development
  • New treaties to supplement the framework
  • Amendments
  • Decisions of the parties
  • Political agreements
  • Ambiguity, interpretation, and subsequent practice
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Evolution of the United Nations Climate Regime
  • Introduction
  • Agenda-setting (1985-1990)
  • Constitutional phase: negotiation and entry into force of the FCCC (1990-1995)
  • Regulatory phase: negotiation and elaboration of the Kyoto protocol (1995-2005)
  • Second constitutional phase: negotiating the future climate regime (2005-2016)
  • Bali Action Plan
  • Copenhagen Accord
  • Cancun Agreements
  • Durban Platform and Doha Amendment
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • The Framework Convention on Climate Change
  • Introduction
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • Preamble, objective, and principles (Articles 2 and 3)
  • Preamble
  • Objective (Article 2)
  • Principles (Article 3)
  • Background
  • Principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities
  • Precaution and cost-effectiveness
  • Sustainable development
  • Supportive and open economic system
  • Commitments (Articles 4-6 and 12)
  • General commitments (Articles 4.1, 5, 6, and 12.1)
  • Mitigation (Articles 4.1(b)-(d) and 4.2)
  • Targets and timetables
  • Comprehensive approach
  • Joint implementation
  • Adaptation (Articles 4.1(b) and (e), 4.8, and 4.9)
  • Financial support (Articles 4.3 and 4.4)
  • Technology transfer (Article 4.5)
  • Transparency (Articles 4.1(a) and 12)
  • Institutions (Articles 7-11)
  • Conference of the Parties (Article 7)
  • Secretariat (Article 8)
  • Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (Article 9)
  • Subsidiary Body for Implementation (Article 10)
  • Financial mechanism (Articles 11 and 21.3)
  • Implementation and compliance mechanisms (Articles 7.2 and 12-14)
  • Overview
  • Reporting (Article 12)
  • International review (Article 7.2)
  • Multilateral consultative process to resolve questions regarding implementation (Article 13)
  • Dispute settlement (Article 14)
  • Final clauses (Articles 15-25)
  • Amendments, annexes, and protocols to the convention (Articles 15, 16, and 17)
  • Voting rights, signature, and ratification (Articles 18, 20, and 22)
  • Entry into force (Article 23)
  • Reservations and withdrawal (Articles 24 and 25)
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Kyoto Protocol
  • Introduction
  • The second and future commitment periods of the Kyoto Protocol
  • Conclusion
  • Select Bibliography
  • Overarching issues
  • Legal bindingness
  • Architecture
  • Scope
  • Differentiation
  • Differentiation between Annex I and non-Annex I parties
  • Differentiation within the category of Annex I parties
  • Voluntary commitments for developing countries
  • Preamble and definitions (Article 1)
  • Commitments (Articles 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, and 11)
  • General commitments
  • Specific commitments for Annex I and Annex II parties
  • Policies and measures (Article 2)
  • Banking
  • Mitigation targets and timetables (Article 3)
  • Legal character
  • Differentiated targets
  • Collective target
  • Base year
  • Assigned amount units
  • Sinks
  • Multi-year commitment period
  • Joint fulfillment
  • Financial support (Article 11)
  • Mechanisms (Articles 6, 12, and 17)
  • Joint implementation (Article 6)
  • Clean Development Mechanism (Article 12)
  • Additionality
  • Sustainable development
  • Project eligibility
  • Project types
  • Unilateral CDM
  • Programmatic CDM
  • Other project types
  • Equitable geographical distribution of CDM projects
  • Share of proceeds
  • Emissions trading (Article 17)
  • Outlook
  • Reporting, review, and compliance (Articles 5, 7, 8, and 18)
  • Reporting and review (Article 5, 7, and 8)
  • Compliance procedures and mechanisms
  • Context and goals
  • Triggers
  • The Compliance Committee and its process
  • The facilitative branch
  • The enforcement branch
  • Outlook
  • Institutions (Articles 13, 14, and 15)
  • Multilateral consultative process (Article 16)
  • Final clauses (Articles 19-28)
Control code
025749602
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xxxix, 374 pages
Isbn
9780199664306
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
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