Coverart for item
The Resource Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945, Yuki Terazawa, (electronic book)

Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945, Yuki Terazawa, (electronic book)

Label
Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945
Title
Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945
Statement of responsibility
Yuki Terazawa
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book analyzes how women’s bodies became a subject and object of modern bio-power by examining the history of women’s reproductive health in Japan between the seventeenth century and the mid-twentieth century. Yuki Terazawa combines Foucauldian theory and feminist ideas with in-depth historical research. She argues that central to the rise of bio-power and the colonization of people by this power was modern scientific taxonomies that classify people into categories of gender, race, nationality, class, disability, and disease. While discussions of the roles played by the modern state are of critical importance to this project, significant attention is also paid to the increasing influences of male obstetricians and the parts that trained midwives and public health nurses played in the dissemination of modern power after the 1868 Meiji Restoration. .--
Member of
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Terazawa, Yuki
Dewey number
618.1
Index
index present
LC call number
RG121
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Genders and sexualities in history
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Reproductive health
  • Women
  • Fertility, Human
  • Japan
Label
Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945, Yuki Terazawa, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Series Editor' Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Notes to the Reader; The Periodization of Japanese History; The Tokugawa System; Names and Romanization; List of Figures; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: The Reproductive Body of the Goseihō School; Goseihō's Microcosmic Body15; Manase Dōsan and the Goseihō School; Obstetrics and Gynecology Through the Genroku Era28; Katsuki Gyūzan and His Work; Pronatalist Reproductive Techniques; Disciplining Pregnant Women; Representing the Birthing Process; Markers of Sexual Difference
  • Chapter 3: Changing Perceptions of the Female Body: The Rise of the Kagawa School of ObstetricsThe Rise of the School of Ancient Practice; The Kagawa School of Obstetrics; Kagawa Gen'etsu; The Reconceptualization of the Body in Sanron and Sanron Yoku; A New System of Obstetric Procedures; Obstetric Practice in Commercialized Society; The State, Physicians, and Reproductive Surveillance; Chapter 4: The State, Midwives, Expectant Mothers, and Childbirth Reforms from the Meiji Through to the Early Shōwa Period (1868-1930s); The Establishment of New Medical and Public Health Systems
  • Changing Power Relations Involving the State, Medical Experts, and Expectant Mothers in Meiji JapanEarly Meiji Regulations; The Making of Modern, Nationalist Midwives; Childbirth Reforms; Reproductive Surveillance Through Midwives; Chapter 5: Women's Health Reforms in Japan at the Turn of the Twentieth Century; Discourse on "Japanese Bodies" and Adopting the Eugenics Thought; Molding Young Women's Bodies Through Physical Education; Medicalized Discourse on Women's Clothes and Beauty; Women's Resistances and Collusions; Chapter 6: Knowledge, Power, and New Maternal Health Policies (1918-1945)
  • Efforts to Provide Free Midwifery Services for Poor WomenThe Aiiku Association and Maternal and Infant Health in Rural Japan; New Maternal and Infant Health Policies, 1937-1942; Chapter 7: Epilogue; Select Bibliography; Select Primary Sources in Japanese Language; Journals; Books; Select General Sources; Index
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319730837
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
System control number
  • on1031706367
  • (OCoLC)1031706367
Label
Knowledge, power, and women's reproductive health in Japan, 1690--1945, Yuki Terazawa, (electronic book)
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Series Editor' Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Notes to the Reader; The Periodization of Japanese History; The Tokugawa System; Names and Romanization; List of Figures; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: The Reproductive Body of the Goseihō School; Goseihō's Microcosmic Body15; Manase Dōsan and the Goseihō School; Obstetrics and Gynecology Through the Genroku Era28; Katsuki Gyūzan and His Work; Pronatalist Reproductive Techniques; Disciplining Pregnant Women; Representing the Birthing Process; Markers of Sexual Difference
  • Chapter 3: Changing Perceptions of the Female Body: The Rise of the Kagawa School of ObstetricsThe Rise of the School of Ancient Practice; The Kagawa School of Obstetrics; Kagawa Gen'etsu; The Reconceptualization of the Body in Sanron and Sanron Yoku; A New System of Obstetric Procedures; Obstetric Practice in Commercialized Society; The State, Physicians, and Reproductive Surveillance; Chapter 4: The State, Midwives, Expectant Mothers, and Childbirth Reforms from the Meiji Through to the Early Shōwa Period (1868-1930s); The Establishment of New Medical and Public Health Systems
  • Changing Power Relations Involving the State, Medical Experts, and Expectant Mothers in Meiji JapanEarly Meiji Regulations; The Making of Modern, Nationalist Midwives; Childbirth Reforms; Reproductive Surveillance Through Midwives; Chapter 5: Women's Health Reforms in Japan at the Turn of the Twentieth Century; Discourse on "Japanese Bodies" and Adopting the Eugenics Thought; Molding Young Women's Bodies Through Physical Education; Medicalized Discourse on Women's Clothes and Beauty; Women's Resistances and Collusions; Chapter 6: Knowledge, Power, and New Maternal Health Policies (1918-1945)
  • Efforts to Provide Free Midwifery Services for Poor WomenThe Aiiku Association and Maternal and Infant Health in Rural Japan; New Maternal and Infant Health Policies, 1937-1942; Chapter 7: Epilogue; Select Bibliography; Select Primary Sources in Japanese Language; Journals; Books; Select General Sources; Index
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319730837
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
System control number
  • on1031706367
  • (OCoLC)1031706367

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