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The Resource Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics, [edited by] Adarsh Sandhu, Hiroshi Handa

Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics, [edited by] Adarsh Sandhu, Hiroshi Handa

Label
Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics
Title
Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics
Statement of responsibility
[edited by] Adarsh Sandhu, Hiroshi Handa
Contributor
Editor
Publisher
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Magnetic Nanoparticles for Medical Diagnostics was written to encourage members of the medical profession to join experts from other research fields in exploring the unique physical properties of magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications. It demonstrates the evolution from small groups of scientists fabricating magnetic sensors to multidisciplinary research on wide-ranging medical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, illustrating the regenerative and dynamic nature of this area of research. It covers topics such as magnetic probe and magnetic nanoparticles for sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic separation of endosomes, exosomes, mitochondria, autophagosomes using magnetic beads, fluorescent magnetic beads for medical diagnostics, and magnetic hyperthermia using implant type heating mediators. Part of Series in Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Member of
Biographical or historical data
Adarsh Sandhu came to Japan in 1985 after receiving a Monbusho Scholarship to study at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and University of Tokyo. Then, in 1986 after completing his doctoral thesis at the University of Manchester, England, he joined Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., Atsugi, Japan. In August 2002, Dr. Sandhu accepted a tenured position at the Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Centre, Tokyo Institute of Technology. Professor Adarsh Sandhu worked deputy director of the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology. Other responsibilities at Toyohashi include presidential advisor head of international public relations. Professor Adarsh Sandhu is currently a member of the Department of Engineering Science Graduate School of Information and Engineering, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo. Hiroshi Handa graduated from Keio University, School of Medicine in 1972 and received his M.D. and Ph.D. in 1976 from the above. He was appointed as Assistant Professor at the University of Tokyo in 1976. He then worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the supervision of Professor Philip A. Sharp from 1978 to 1980. He was appointed as Associate Professor in 1984 at the University of Tokyo, and as Professor in 1991 at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Since 2012, he has been a Professor at Tokyo Medical University and an Emeritus Professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology.
Cataloging source
CaBNVSL
Dewey number
610.28
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
LC call number
R857.N34
LC item number
M346 2018eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1946-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Sandhu, Adarsh
  • Handa, H.
  • Institute of Physics (Great Britain)
Series statement
  • IOP release 5
  • IOP expanding physics,
  • Series in physics and engineering in medicine and biology
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nanostructures
  • Nanomedicine
  • Diagnostic imaging
  • Magnetite Nanoparticles
  • Drug Carriers
  • Diagnostic Imaging
Target audience
adult
Label
Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics, [edited by] Adarsh Sandhu, Hiroshi Handa
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"Version: 20180801"--Title page verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Portable magnetic probe for detecting magnetic nanoparticles inside the body -- 1.1. Sentinel lymph node biopsy -- 1.2. Use of magnetic nanoparticles for sentinel lymph node biopsy -- 1.3. Pharmacokinetics of magnetic nanoparticles in the lymphatic system -- 1.4. Techniques for detecting magnetic nanoparticles -- 1.5. Portable magnetic probe using a permanent magnet -- 1.6. Clinical applications -- 1.7. Conclusions and future prospects
  • 2. Magnetic separation of organelles using magnetic beads -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Magnetic separation of endosomes -- 2.3. Magnetic separation of exosomes -- 2.4. Magnetic separation of mitochondria -- 2.5. Magnetic separation of autophagosomes -- 2.6. Conclusions and future outlook
  • 3. Development of a new affinity nanobead technology and target isolation of bioactive compounds -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Preparation of SG beads -- 3.3. Immobilization of DNA to SG beads -- 3.4. Purification of a transcriptional regulatory factor bound to a specific DNA sequence -- 3.5. Purification from crude cell extract with SG-DNA beads -- 3.6. Development of FG beads -- 3.7. Identification of the direct targets of internal bioactive compounds -- 3.8. Identification of the direct targets of natural products -- 3.9. Identification of the direct targets of pharmaceutical drugs -- 3.10. Identification of a direct target of thalidomide using FG beads -- 3.11. Functions of CRBN, the common direct primary target of IMiDs and other glutarimide-containing compounds -- 3.12. Development of a new type of CRBN-based drug -- 3.13. Conclusions
  • 4. Fluorescent magnetic beads for medical diagnostics -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Production of novel fluorescent magnetic beads (fluorescent ferrite beads; FF beads) -- 4.3. Functionalization of FF beads -- 4.4. Fast DNA hybridization using magnetic collection of FF beads -- 4.5. Rapid sandwich immunoassay introducing magnetic collection of FF beads : fast detection of the heart failure biomarker BNP -- 4.6. Rapid sandwich immunoassay introducing magnetic collection of FFbeads : fast detection of the prostate cancer biomarker PSA -- 4.7. Rapid immunostaining introducing magnetic collection of FF beads -- 4.8. Conclusion
  • 5. Development of surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications -- 5.1. Medical uses of magnetic materials -- 5.2. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.3. Virus capsid proteins -- 5.4. Scientific and medical applications of virus capsid protein -- 5.5. Technologies that modify the surface of viral capsids -- 5.6. Technologies used to encapsulate materials within the virus capsid -- 5.7. Development of functional viral capsid-coated artificial beads, including magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.8. Medical applications of functional viral capsid-coated artificial beads, including magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.9. Conclusion
  • 6. Magnetic hyperthermia treatment -- 6.1. Introduction to magnetic hyperthermia -- 6.2. Principle of magnetic hyperthermia -- 6.3. Measurement of specific loss power (SLP) -- 6.4. Iron oxide based heating mediators -- 6.5. In vivo studies -- 6.6. Implant-type heating mediators -- 6.7. Alternating magnetic field applicator -- 6.8. Prospects
  • 7. Synthesis, dispersion and application of stable magnetic colloids -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. History of magnetic fluid -- 7.3. Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles -- 7.4. Stability of magnetic fluid -- 7.5. Preparation of magnetic fluid -- 7.6. Magnetic fluid based applications -- 7.7. Summary
  • 8. Optical and magnetic detection of magnetic beads for medical diagnostics for point of care testing -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Review of magnetic particle detection methods -- 8.3. Non-specific interaction of magnetic particles -- 8.4. Design of micro-coils -- 8.5. Experimental evaluation -- 8.6. Quantitative detection of biotin -- 8.7. Digital image processing -- 8.8. Conclusion and future work
Control code
9780750315845
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (various pagings)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780750315838
Media category
electronic
Media MARC source
isbdmedia
Other physical details
illustrations (some color).
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Magnetic nanoparticles for medical diagnostics, [edited by] Adarsh Sandhu, Hiroshi Handa
Publication
Note
"Version: 20180801"--Title page verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Portable magnetic probe for detecting magnetic nanoparticles inside the body -- 1.1. Sentinel lymph node biopsy -- 1.2. Use of magnetic nanoparticles for sentinel lymph node biopsy -- 1.3. Pharmacokinetics of magnetic nanoparticles in the lymphatic system -- 1.4. Techniques for detecting magnetic nanoparticles -- 1.5. Portable magnetic probe using a permanent magnet -- 1.6. Clinical applications -- 1.7. Conclusions and future prospects
  • 2. Magnetic separation of organelles using magnetic beads -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. Magnetic separation of endosomes -- 2.3. Magnetic separation of exosomes -- 2.4. Magnetic separation of mitochondria -- 2.5. Magnetic separation of autophagosomes -- 2.6. Conclusions and future outlook
  • 3. Development of a new affinity nanobead technology and target isolation of bioactive compounds -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Preparation of SG beads -- 3.3. Immobilization of DNA to SG beads -- 3.4. Purification of a transcriptional regulatory factor bound to a specific DNA sequence -- 3.5. Purification from crude cell extract with SG-DNA beads -- 3.6. Development of FG beads -- 3.7. Identification of the direct targets of internal bioactive compounds -- 3.8. Identification of the direct targets of natural products -- 3.9. Identification of the direct targets of pharmaceutical drugs -- 3.10. Identification of a direct target of thalidomide using FG beads -- 3.11. Functions of CRBN, the common direct primary target of IMiDs and other glutarimide-containing compounds -- 3.12. Development of a new type of CRBN-based drug -- 3.13. Conclusions
  • 4. Fluorescent magnetic beads for medical diagnostics -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Production of novel fluorescent magnetic beads (fluorescent ferrite beads; FF beads) -- 4.3. Functionalization of FF beads -- 4.4. Fast DNA hybridization using magnetic collection of FF beads -- 4.5. Rapid sandwich immunoassay introducing magnetic collection of FF beads : fast detection of the heart failure biomarker BNP -- 4.6. Rapid sandwich immunoassay introducing magnetic collection of FFbeads : fast detection of the prostate cancer biomarker PSA -- 4.7. Rapid immunostaining introducing magnetic collection of FF beads -- 4.8. Conclusion
  • 5. Development of surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications -- 5.1. Medical uses of magnetic materials -- 5.2. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.3. Virus capsid proteins -- 5.4. Scientific and medical applications of virus capsid protein -- 5.5. Technologies that modify the surface of viral capsids -- 5.6. Technologies used to encapsulate materials within the virus capsid -- 5.7. Development of functional viral capsid-coated artificial beads, including magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.8. Medical applications of functional viral capsid-coated artificial beads, including magnetic nanoparticles -- 5.9. Conclusion
  • 6. Magnetic hyperthermia treatment -- 6.1. Introduction to magnetic hyperthermia -- 6.2. Principle of magnetic hyperthermia -- 6.3. Measurement of specific loss power (SLP) -- 6.4. Iron oxide based heating mediators -- 6.5. In vivo studies -- 6.6. Implant-type heating mediators -- 6.7. Alternating magnetic field applicator -- 6.8. Prospects
  • 7. Synthesis, dispersion and application of stable magnetic colloids -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. History of magnetic fluid -- 7.3. Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles -- 7.4. Stability of magnetic fluid -- 7.5. Preparation of magnetic fluid -- 7.6. Magnetic fluid based applications -- 7.7. Summary
  • 8. Optical and magnetic detection of magnetic beads for medical diagnostics for point of care testing -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Review of magnetic particle detection methods -- 8.3. Non-specific interaction of magnetic particles -- 8.4. Design of micro-coils -- 8.5. Experimental evaluation -- 8.6. Quantitative detection of biotin -- 8.7. Digital image processing -- 8.8. Conclusion and future work
Control code
9780750315845
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (various pagings)
File format
multiple file formats
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780750315838
Media category
electronic
Media MARC source
isbdmedia
Other physical details
illustrations (some color).
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote

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