Coverart for item
The Resource Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition, (electronic book)

Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition, (electronic book)

Label
Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition
Title
Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Metabolomics enables valuable information about the biochemical composition of foods to be rapidly obtained. Since the biochemical profile of food largely determines key food properties such as flavour and shelf life, the information gained using metabolomics-based methods will enable greater control of food quality and also help to determine the relationship between diet and health. Metabolomics in food and nutrition provides an overview of their current and potential use in the food industry. Part one reviews equipment, methods and data interpretation in metabolomics including the use
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Weimer, B. C
Dewey number
  • 615.8
  • 615.8/54
Index
no index present
LC call number
RM217
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Slupsky, C. M
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Metabolism
  • Functional foods
  • Nutrigenomics
  • Nutrition
Label
Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
8.2 Metabolomic studies on selected Poaceae species
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Metabolomics in foodand nutrition; Copyright; Contents; Contributor contact details; Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition; Introduction; Part I Equipment, methods and data interpretation in metabolomics; 1. Equipment and metabolite identification (ID) strategies for mass-based metabolomic analysis C.J. Wachsmuth, P.J. Oefner and K. Dettmer, University of Regensburg, Germany; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Liquid chromatography; 1.3 Gas chromatography; 1.4 Mass spectrometry technologies; 1.5 Analytical systems; 1.6 Compound identification (ID) approaches
  • 1.7 Databases for tracking and interconnections1.8 Future trends; 1.9 Sources of further information and advice; 1.10 Acknowledgments; 1.11 References; 2. Metabolomics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) J. Sotelo and C.M. Slupsky, University of California, Davis, USA; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Experimental design and preparation; 2.3 Experimental process and analysis; 2.4 Current applications and future trends; 2.5 References; 2.6 Appendix: abbreviations; 3. Statistical methods in metabolomics J.R. Stevens, Utah State University, USA; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Exploratory/visual approaches
  • 3.3 Inferential approaches3.4 Multiple hypothesis testing; 3.5 Ensemble learning approaches; 3.6 Conclusion; 3.7 References; 3.8 Appendix: software packages used; 4. Metabolic reconstruction databases and their application to metabolomics research P.D. Karp, SRI International, USA; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Overview of Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB) construction; 4.3 Querying PGDBs; 4.4 Metabolomics applications; 4.5 Sources of further information and advice; 4.6 Conclusion; 4.7 Acknowledgments; 4.8 References; Part II Applications of metabolomics in humans, plants and food
  • 5. Human samples for health assessments P.D. Whitfi eld and M.K. Doherty, University of the Highlands and Islands, UK5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Sample collections and biobanks; 5.3 Variation in metabolite profiles of human biofluids and tissues; 5.4 Standards for metabolomic studies; 5.5 Conclusions and future trends; 5.6 References; 6. Metabolomics in nutrition S. Moco, A. Ross, F.-P.J. Martin, S. Collino, J.-P. Godin, S. Rezzi and S. Kochhar, Nestlé Research Center, Switzerland; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Epidemiological studies and biomarkers of food intake; 6.3 Diet and metabolic syndrome
  • 6.4 The role of intestinal microbiota in nutrition6.5 Perspectives in nutrition research; 6.6 Future trends; 6.7 References; 7. Current methods for the analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and their novel applications L.R. Ruhaak and C.B. Lebrilla, University of California, Davis, USA; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs); 7.3 Applications of HMO analysis; 7.4 Conclusion; 7.5 References; 7.6 Appendix: abbreviations; 8. Metabolomic analysis of plants and crops T. Frank and K.-H. Engel, Technische Universität München, Germany; 8.1 Introduction
Control code
SCIDI865332648
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (262 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780857098818
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Metabolomics In Food And Nutrition, (electronic book)
Publication
Note
8.2 Metabolomic studies on selected Poaceae species
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Metabolomics in foodand nutrition; Copyright; Contents; Contributor contact details; Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition; Introduction; Part I Equipment, methods and data interpretation in metabolomics; 1. Equipment and metabolite identification (ID) strategies for mass-based metabolomic analysis C.J. Wachsmuth, P.J. Oefner and K. Dettmer, University of Regensburg, Germany; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Liquid chromatography; 1.3 Gas chromatography; 1.4 Mass spectrometry technologies; 1.5 Analytical systems; 1.6 Compound identification (ID) approaches
  • 1.7 Databases for tracking and interconnections1.8 Future trends; 1.9 Sources of further information and advice; 1.10 Acknowledgments; 1.11 References; 2. Metabolomics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) J. Sotelo and C.M. Slupsky, University of California, Davis, USA; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Experimental design and preparation; 2.3 Experimental process and analysis; 2.4 Current applications and future trends; 2.5 References; 2.6 Appendix: abbreviations; 3. Statistical methods in metabolomics J.R. Stevens, Utah State University, USA; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Exploratory/visual approaches
  • 3.3 Inferential approaches3.4 Multiple hypothesis testing; 3.5 Ensemble learning approaches; 3.6 Conclusion; 3.7 References; 3.8 Appendix: software packages used; 4. Metabolic reconstruction databases and their application to metabolomics research P.D. Karp, SRI International, USA; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Overview of Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB) construction; 4.3 Querying PGDBs; 4.4 Metabolomics applications; 4.5 Sources of further information and advice; 4.6 Conclusion; 4.7 Acknowledgments; 4.8 References; Part II Applications of metabolomics in humans, plants and food
  • 5. Human samples for health assessments P.D. Whitfi eld and M.K. Doherty, University of the Highlands and Islands, UK5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Sample collections and biobanks; 5.3 Variation in metabolite profiles of human biofluids and tissues; 5.4 Standards for metabolomic studies; 5.5 Conclusions and future trends; 5.6 References; 6. Metabolomics in nutrition S. Moco, A. Ross, F.-P.J. Martin, S. Collino, J.-P. Godin, S. Rezzi and S. Kochhar, Nestlé Research Center, Switzerland; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Epidemiological studies and biomarkers of food intake; 6.3 Diet and metabolic syndrome
  • 6.4 The role of intestinal microbiota in nutrition6.5 Perspectives in nutrition research; 6.6 Future trends; 6.7 References; 7. Current methods for the analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and their novel applications L.R. Ruhaak and C.B. Lebrilla, University of California, Davis, USA; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs); 7.3 Applications of HMO analysis; 7.4 Conclusion; 7.5 References; 7.6 Appendix: abbreviations; 8. Metabolomic analysis of plants and crops T. Frank and K.-H. Engel, Technische Universität München, Germany; 8.1 Introduction
Control code
SCIDI865332648
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (262 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780857098818
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote

Library Locations

Processing Feedback ...