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The Resource Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals, Matt J. Keeling and Pejman Rohani

Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals, Matt J. Keeling and Pejman Rohani

Label
Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals
Title
Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals
Statement of responsibility
Matt J. Keeling and Pejman Rohani
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"For epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, and health-care professionals, real-time and predictive modeling of infectious disease is of growing importance. This book provides a timely and comprehensive introduction to the modeling of infectious diseases in humans and animals, focusing on recent developments as well as more traditional approaches." "Matt Keeling and Pejman Rohani move from modeling with simple differential equations to more recent, complex models, where spacial structure, seasonal "forcing," or stochasticity influence the dynamics, and where computer simulation needs to be used to generate theory. In each of the eight chapters, they deal with a specific modeling approach or set of techniques designed to capture a particular biological factor. The illustrate the methodology used with examples from recent research literature on human and infectious disease modeling, showing how such techniques can be used in practice. Diseases considered include BSE, foot-and-mouth, HIV, measles, rubella, smallpox, and West Nile virus, among others. Particular attention is given throughout the book to the development of practical models, useful both as predictive tools and as a means to understand fundamental epidemiological processes. To emphasize this approach, the last chapter is dedicated to modeling and understanding the control of diseases throughout vaccination, quarantine, or calling."--BOOK JACKET
Cataloging source
NLM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Keeling, Matthew James.
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Rohani, Pejman.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Communicable diseases
  • Communicable diseases in animals
  • Epidemiologic Methods
  • Communicable Disease Control
  • Communicable Diseases
  • Models, Theoretical
Label
Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals, Matt J. Keeling and Pejman Rohani
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [337]-359) and index
Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Ch. 1.
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • 1.1.
  • Types of Disease.
  • p. 1
  • 1.2.
  • Characterization of Diseases.
  • p. 3
  • 1.3.
  • Control of Infectious Diseases.
  • p. 5
  • 1.4.
  • What Are Mathematical Models?.
  • p. 7
  • 1.5.
  • What Models Can Do.
  • p. 8
  • 1.6.
  • What Models Cannot Do.
  • p. 10
  • 1.7.
  • What Is a Good Model?.
  • p. 10
  • 1.8.
  • Layout of This Book.
  • p. 11
  • 1.9.
  • What Else Should You Know?.
  • p. 13
  • Ch. 2.
  • Introduction to Simple Epidemic Models.
  • p. 15
  • 2.1.
  • Formulating the Deterministic SIR Model.
  • p. 16
  • 2.2.
  • Infection-Induced Mortality and SI Models.
  • p. 34
  • 2.3.
  • Without Immunity: The SIS Model.
  • p. 39
  • 2.4.
  • Waning Immunity: The SIRS Model.
  • p. 40
  • 2.5.
  • Adding a Latent Period: The SEIR Model.
  • p. 41
  • 2.6.
  • Infections with a Carrier State.
  • p. 44
  • 2.7.
  • Discrete-Time Models.
  • p. 46
  • 2.8.
  • Parameterization.
  • p. 48
  • 2.9.
  • Summary.
  • p. 52
  • Ch. 3.
  • Host Heterogeneities.
  • p. 54
  • 3.1.
  • Risk-Structure: Sexually Transmitted Infections.
  • p. 55
  • 3.2.
  • Age-Structure: Childhood Infections.
  • p. 77
  • 3.3.
  • Dependence on Time Since Infection.
  • p. 93
  • 3.4.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 102
  • 3.5.
  • Summary.
  • p. 103
  • Ch. 4.
  • Multi-Pathogen/Multi-Host Models.
  • p. 105
  • 4.1.
  • Multiple Pathogens.
  • p. 106
  • 4.2.
  • Multiple Hosts.
  • p. 128
  • 4.3.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 151
  • 4.4.
  • Summary.
  • p. 153
  • Ch. 5.
  • Temporally Forced Models.
  • p. 155
  • 5.1.
  • Historical Background.
  • p. 155
  • 5.2.
  • Modeling Forcing in Childhood Infectious Diseases: Measles.
  • p. 159
  • 5.3.
  • Seasonality in Other Diseases.
  • p. 181
  • 5.4.
  • Summary.
  • p. 187
  • Ch. 6.
  • Stochastic Dynamics.
  • p. 190
  • 6.1.
  • Observational Noise.
  • p. 193
  • 6.2.
  • Process Noise.
  • p. 193
  • 6.3.
  • Event-Driven Approaches.
  • p. 200
  • 6.4.
  • Parameterization of Stochastic Models.
  • p. 219
  • 6.5.
  • Interaction of Noise with Heterogeneities.
  • p. 219
  • 6.6.
  • Analytical Methods.
  • p. 222
  • 6.7.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 230
  • 6.8.
  • Summary.
  • p. 230
  • Ch. 7.
  • Spatial Models.
  • p. 232
  • 7.1.
  • Concepts.
  • p. 233
  • 7.2.
  • Metapopulations.
  • p. 237
  • 7.3.
  • Lattice-Based Models.
  • p. 255
  • 7.4.
  • Continuous-Space Continuous-Population Models.
  • p. 262
  • 7.5.
  • Individual-Based Models.
  • p. 268
  • 7.6.
  • Networks.
  • p. 276
  • 7.7.
  • Which Model to Use?.
  • p. 282
  • 7.8.
  • Approximations.
  • p. 283
  • 7.9.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 287
  • 7.10.
  • Summary.
  • p. 288
  • Ch. 8.
  • Controlling Infectious Diseases.
  • p. 291
  • 8.1.
  • Vaccination.
  • p. 292
  • 8.2.
  • Contact Tracing and Isolation.
  • p. 308
  • 8.3.
  • Case Study: Smallpox, Contact Tracing, and Isolation.
  • p. 313
  • 8.4.
  • Case Study: Foot-and-Mouth Disease, Spatial Spread, and Local Control.
  • p. 321
  • 8.5.
  • Case Study: Swine Fever Virus, Seasonal Dynamics, and Pulsed Control.
  • p. 327
  • 8.6.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 333
  • 8.7.
  • Summary.
  • p. 334
  • References.
  • p. 337
  • Index.
  • p. 361
  • Parameter Glossary.
  • p. 367
Control code
ocn163616681
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xi, 366 p.
Isbn
9780691116174
Lccn
2006939548
Other physical details
ill., maps
Label
Modeling infectious diseases in humans and animals, Matt J. Keeling and Pejman Rohani
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [337]-359) and index
Contents
  • Acknowledgments
  • Ch. 1.
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • 1.1.
  • Types of Disease.
  • p. 1
  • 1.2.
  • Characterization of Diseases.
  • p. 3
  • 1.3.
  • Control of Infectious Diseases.
  • p. 5
  • 1.4.
  • What Are Mathematical Models?.
  • p. 7
  • 1.5.
  • What Models Can Do.
  • p. 8
  • 1.6.
  • What Models Cannot Do.
  • p. 10
  • 1.7.
  • What Is a Good Model?.
  • p. 10
  • 1.8.
  • Layout of This Book.
  • p. 11
  • 1.9.
  • What Else Should You Know?.
  • p. 13
  • Ch. 2.
  • Introduction to Simple Epidemic Models.
  • p. 15
  • 2.1.
  • Formulating the Deterministic SIR Model.
  • p. 16
  • 2.2.
  • Infection-Induced Mortality and SI Models.
  • p. 34
  • 2.3.
  • Without Immunity: The SIS Model.
  • p. 39
  • 2.4.
  • Waning Immunity: The SIRS Model.
  • p. 40
  • 2.5.
  • Adding a Latent Period: The SEIR Model.
  • p. 41
  • 2.6.
  • Infections with a Carrier State.
  • p. 44
  • 2.7.
  • Discrete-Time Models.
  • p. 46
  • 2.8.
  • Parameterization.
  • p. 48
  • 2.9.
  • Summary.
  • p. 52
  • Ch. 3.
  • Host Heterogeneities.
  • p. 54
  • 3.1.
  • Risk-Structure: Sexually Transmitted Infections.
  • p. 55
  • 3.2.
  • Age-Structure: Childhood Infections.
  • p. 77
  • 3.3.
  • Dependence on Time Since Infection.
  • p. 93
  • 3.4.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 102
  • 3.5.
  • Summary.
  • p. 103
  • Ch. 4.
  • Multi-Pathogen/Multi-Host Models.
  • p. 105
  • 4.1.
  • Multiple Pathogens.
  • p. 106
  • 4.2.
  • Multiple Hosts.
  • p. 128
  • 4.3.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 151
  • 4.4.
  • Summary.
  • p. 153
  • Ch. 5.
  • Temporally Forced Models.
  • p. 155
  • 5.1.
  • Historical Background.
  • p. 155
  • 5.2.
  • Modeling Forcing in Childhood Infectious Diseases: Measles.
  • p. 159
  • 5.3.
  • Seasonality in Other Diseases.
  • p. 181
  • 5.4.
  • Summary.
  • p. 187
  • Ch. 6.
  • Stochastic Dynamics.
  • p. 190
  • 6.1.
  • Observational Noise.
  • p. 193
  • 6.2.
  • Process Noise.
  • p. 193
  • 6.3.
  • Event-Driven Approaches.
  • p. 200
  • 6.4.
  • Parameterization of Stochastic Models.
  • p. 219
  • 6.5.
  • Interaction of Noise with Heterogeneities.
  • p. 219
  • 6.6.
  • Analytical Methods.
  • p. 222
  • 6.7.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 230
  • 6.8.
  • Summary.
  • p. 230
  • Ch. 7.
  • Spatial Models.
  • p. 232
  • 7.1.
  • Concepts.
  • p. 233
  • 7.2.
  • Metapopulations.
  • p. 237
  • 7.3.
  • Lattice-Based Models.
  • p. 255
  • 7.4.
  • Continuous-Space Continuous-Population Models.
  • p. 262
  • 7.5.
  • Individual-Based Models.
  • p. 268
  • 7.6.
  • Networks.
  • p. 276
  • 7.7.
  • Which Model to Use?.
  • p. 282
  • 7.8.
  • Approximations.
  • p. 283
  • 7.9.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 287
  • 7.10.
  • Summary.
  • p. 288
  • Ch. 8.
  • Controlling Infectious Diseases.
  • p. 291
  • 8.1.
  • Vaccination.
  • p. 292
  • 8.2.
  • Contact Tracing and Isolation.
  • p. 308
  • 8.3.
  • Case Study: Smallpox, Contact Tracing, and Isolation.
  • p. 313
  • 8.4.
  • Case Study: Foot-and-Mouth Disease, Spatial Spread, and Local Control.
  • p. 321
  • 8.5.
  • Case Study: Swine Fever Virus, Seasonal Dynamics, and Pulsed Control.
  • p. 327
  • 8.6.
  • Future Directions.
  • p. 333
  • 8.7.
  • Summary.
  • p. 334
  • References.
  • p. 337
  • Index.
  • p. 361
  • Parameter Glossary.
  • p. 367
Control code
ocn163616681
Dimensions
26 cm.
Extent
xi, 366 p.
Isbn
9780691116174
Lccn
2006939548
Other physical details
ill., maps

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      53.418074 -2.967913
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      53.294668 -3.027523
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