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The Resource Primate hearing and communication, Rolf M. Quam, Marissa A. Ramsier, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors

Primate hearing and communication, Rolf M. Quam, Marissa A. Ramsier, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors

Label
Primate hearing and communication
Title
Primate hearing and communication
Statement of responsibility
Rolf M. Quam, Marissa A. Ramsier, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Primate Hearing and Communication provides unique insights into the evolution of hearing and communication in primates, including humans. · Introduction to Primate Hearing and Communication Marissa A. Ramsier and Rolf M. Quam · The Primate Peripheral Auditory System and the Evolution of Primate Hearing SirpaNummela · Primate Audition: Reception, Perception, and Ecology Marissa A. Ramsier and Josef P. Rauschecker · Primate Habitat Acoustics Charles H. Brown and Peter M. Waser · Evolutionary Origins of Primate Vocal Communication: Diversity, Flexibility, and Complexity of Vocalizations in Basal Primates Elke Zimmermann · Vocal Communication in Family-Living and Pair-Bonded Primates Charles T. Snowdon · The Primate Roots of Human Language Klaus Zuberbühler · Evolution of Hearing and Language in Fossil Hominins Rolf M. Quam, Ignacio Martínez, Manuel Rosa, and Juan Luis Arsuaga Rolf M. Quam is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Binghamton University (SUNY), Binghamton, NY Marissa A. Ramsier is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA Richard R. Fay is Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology at Loyola University of Chicago Arthur N. Popper is Professor Emeritus and Research Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Maryland, College Park
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
573.8/9
Index
no index present
LC call number
QP461
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Quam, Rolf M.
  • Ramsier, Marissa A.
  • Fay, Richard R.
  • Popper, Arthur N.
Series statement
Springer handbook of auditory research,
Series volume
v. 63
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hearing
  • Animal communication
  • Primates
Label
Primate hearing and communication, Rolf M. Quam, Marissa A. Ramsier, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acoustical Society of America; Series Preface; Preface 1992; Volume Preface; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Introduction to Primate Hearing and Communication; 1.1 Introduction to the Primates; 1.2 Primate Hearing and Communication; 1.3 Volume Overview; 1.4 Open Questions and Future Directions; References; Chapter 2: The Primate Peripheral Auditory System and the Evolution of Primate Hearing; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Outer Ear and Interaural Distance; 2.3 Middle Ear; 2.3.1 Temporal Bone; 2.3.2 Middle Ear Structure and Function; 2.3.3 Middle Ear Morphology and Hearing Sensitivity
  • 2.4 Inner Ear2.5 Evolution of Hearing in Primates; 2.5.1 Early Mammalian Hearing; 2.5.2 Early Primate Hearing; 2.5.3 Body Size, Ear Dimensions, and Hearing; 2.6 Hearing, Sensory Ecology, and Primate Origins; 2.7 Conclusions; References; Chapter 3: Primate Audition: Reception, Perception, and Ecology; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Auditory Processing and Perception in Primates; 3.2.1 The Path of Sound: From Cochlea to Auditory Cortex; 3.2.2 Alternate Pathways for Spectral and Spatial Information; 3.2.3 Encoding Signals; 3.2.4 Are Primate Brains Specialized for Processing Vocalizations?
  • 3.2.5 Potential Specializations for Processing Species-Specific Vocalizations3.2.6 Interindividual Recognition; 3.3 Defining, Representing, and Measuring Overall Auditory Sensitivity in Primates; 3.3.1 Defining and Representing Auditory Sensitivity in Primates; 3.3.2 Determining Threshold; 3.3.3 Testing Methods; 3.4 Auditory Sensitivity Among Primates; 3.4.1 Primate Audiograms; 3.4.2 Intraspecies Variation; 3.4.3 Variation in High-Frequency Limit; 3.4.3.1 High-Frequency Limit and Sound Source Localization; 3.4.3.2 High-Frequency Limit, Behavior, and Ecology
  • 3.4.4 Frequency of Best Sensitivity3.4.5 Low-Frequency Limit; 3.5 Summary and Implications for Future Research; References; Chapter 4: Primate Habitat Acoustics; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Geographic Range and Distribution of Nonhuman Primates; 4.3 Forest and Savanna Acoustics; 4.3.1 Habitat Characteristics; 4.3.2 Studying Habitat Acoustics: Ambient Noise and Sound Transmission; 4.3.3 Primate Habitats: How They Differ Acoustically; 4.3.3.1 Ambient Noise; 4.3.3.2 Attenuation; 4.3.3.3 Amplitude Fluctuations; 4.3.3.4 Reverberation; 4.3.3.5 Modulation Depth; 4.3.3.6 Call Degradation
  • 4.3.3.7 Time Domain Distortion Analysis4.3.3.8 Frequency Domain Distortion Analysis; 4.4 The Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis; 4.4.1 The Audible Range of Short- and Long-Distance Calls; 4.5 Evolutionary Aspects of Primate Vocal Signals; 4.5.1 Have Some Calls Evolved to Maximize Active Space?; 4.5.2 Do Primates Modify Call Structure or Use Based on Habitat Acoustics?; 4.5.3 Might Selection Favor Calls that Degrade in Predictable Ways?; 4.5.4 Are Evolutionarily Important Cues Coded in Attributes Resistant to Degradation?; 4.6 Future Research Directions; 4.6.1 Thinking About the Physics
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319594767
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reformatting quality
preservation
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
on1003192615
Label
Primate hearing and communication, Rolf M. Quam, Marissa A. Ramsier, Richard R. Fay, Arthur N. Popper, editors
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Acoustical Society of America; Series Preface; Preface 1992; Volume Preface; Contents; Contributors; Chapter 1: Introduction to Primate Hearing and Communication; 1.1 Introduction to the Primates; 1.2 Primate Hearing and Communication; 1.3 Volume Overview; 1.4 Open Questions and Future Directions; References; Chapter 2: The Primate Peripheral Auditory System and the Evolution of Primate Hearing; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Outer Ear and Interaural Distance; 2.3 Middle Ear; 2.3.1 Temporal Bone; 2.3.2 Middle Ear Structure and Function; 2.3.3 Middle Ear Morphology and Hearing Sensitivity
  • 2.4 Inner Ear2.5 Evolution of Hearing in Primates; 2.5.1 Early Mammalian Hearing; 2.5.2 Early Primate Hearing; 2.5.3 Body Size, Ear Dimensions, and Hearing; 2.6 Hearing, Sensory Ecology, and Primate Origins; 2.7 Conclusions; References; Chapter 3: Primate Audition: Reception, Perception, and Ecology; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Auditory Processing and Perception in Primates; 3.2.1 The Path of Sound: From Cochlea to Auditory Cortex; 3.2.2 Alternate Pathways for Spectral and Spatial Information; 3.2.3 Encoding Signals; 3.2.4 Are Primate Brains Specialized for Processing Vocalizations?
  • 3.2.5 Potential Specializations for Processing Species-Specific Vocalizations3.2.6 Interindividual Recognition; 3.3 Defining, Representing, and Measuring Overall Auditory Sensitivity in Primates; 3.3.1 Defining and Representing Auditory Sensitivity in Primates; 3.3.2 Determining Threshold; 3.3.3 Testing Methods; 3.4 Auditory Sensitivity Among Primates; 3.4.1 Primate Audiograms; 3.4.2 Intraspecies Variation; 3.4.3 Variation in High-Frequency Limit; 3.4.3.1 High-Frequency Limit and Sound Source Localization; 3.4.3.2 High-Frequency Limit, Behavior, and Ecology
  • 3.4.4 Frequency of Best Sensitivity3.4.5 Low-Frequency Limit; 3.5 Summary and Implications for Future Research; References; Chapter 4: Primate Habitat Acoustics; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Geographic Range and Distribution of Nonhuman Primates; 4.3 Forest and Savanna Acoustics; 4.3.1 Habitat Characteristics; 4.3.2 Studying Habitat Acoustics: Ambient Noise and Sound Transmission; 4.3.3 Primate Habitats: How They Differ Acoustically; 4.3.3.1 Ambient Noise; 4.3.3.2 Attenuation; 4.3.3.3 Amplitude Fluctuations; 4.3.3.4 Reverberation; 4.3.3.5 Modulation Depth; 4.3.3.6 Call Degradation
  • 4.3.3.7 Time Domain Distortion Analysis4.3.3.8 Frequency Domain Distortion Analysis; 4.4 The Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis; 4.4.1 The Audible Range of Short- and Long-Distance Calls; 4.5 Evolutionary Aspects of Primate Vocal Signals; 4.5.1 Have Some Calls Evolved to Maximize Active Space?; 4.5.2 Do Primates Modify Call Structure or Use Based on Habitat Acoustics?; 4.5.3 Might Selection Favor Calls that Degrade in Predictable Ways?; 4.5.4 Are Evolutionarily Important Cues Coded in Attributes Resistant to Degradation?; 4.6 Future Research Directions; 4.6.1 Thinking About the Physics
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319594767
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Reformatting quality
preservation
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
on1003192615

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