Coverart for item
The Resource Space psychology and psychiatry, by Nick Kanas, Dietrich Manzey

Space psychology and psychiatry, by Nick Kanas, Dietrich Manzey

Label
Space psychology and psychiatry
Title
Space psychology and psychiatry
Statement of responsibility
by Nick Kanas, Dietrich Manzey
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1945-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Kanas, Nick
  • Manzey, Dietrich
Series statement
Space technology library
Series volume
16
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Space flight
  • Space Flight
  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Astronauts
Label
Space psychology and psychiatry, by Nick Kanas, Dietrich Manzey
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 3
  • 45
  • 3.4.
  • Empirical findings from space: human performance monitoring
  • 48
  • 3.4.1.
  • Results of performance monitoring during short-duration space flight
  • 50
  • 3.4.2.
  • Results of performance monitoring during long-duration space missions
  • 55
  • 1.3.2.
  • 3.4.3.
  • Impairments of tracking and dual-task performance in space: effects of microgravity, stress, or both?
  • 58
  • 3.5.
  • Complex cognitive and perceptual-motor skills
  • 61
  • 3.5.1.
  • Ground-based studies
  • 62
  • 3.5.2.
  • Space analog and simulation studies
  • Empricial findings from space: effects of stressors on complex cognitive and perceptual-motor skills
  • 63
  • Chapter 4.
  • Human Interactions
  • 75
  • 4.1.
  • Interpersonal issues
  • 75
  • 4.2.
  • Crew heterogeneity
  • 3
  • 76
  • 4.2.1.
  • Gender
  • 77
  • 4.2.2.
  • Cultural differences
  • 78
  • 4.2.3.
  • Career motivation and experiences
  • 80
  • 1.3.2.1.
  • 4.2.4.
  • Personality
  • 81
  • 4.2.5.
  • Problems related to crew heterogeneity
  • 83
  • 4.3.
  • Crew cohesion
  • 84
  • 4.3.1.
  • Settings
  • Time effects and mission stage
  • 84
  • 4.3.2.
  • Problems related to changes in cohesion
  • 85
  • 4.4.
  • Language and dialect variations
  • 86
  • 4.4.1.
  • Native language versus space terminology
  • 3
  • 86
  • 4.4.2.
  • Problems related to language and dialect variations
  • 87
  • 4.5.
  • Crew size
  • 87
  • 4.5.1.
  • The impact of size in small groups
  • 87
  • 1.3.2.2.
  • 4.5.2.
  • Problems related to crew size
  • 88
  • 4.6.
  • Leadership roles
  • 89
  • 4.6.1.
  • Task versus supportive roles
  • 89
  • 4.6.2.
  • Relevance to actual space missions
  • Problems related to leadership roles
  • 90
  • 4.7.
  • Crew-ground interactions
  • 90
  • 4.7.1.
  • Ingroup versus outgroup issues
  • 90
  • 4.7.2.
  • Displacement
  • 4
  • 91
  • 4.7.3.
  • Problems related to crew-ground interactions
  • 92
  • 4.8.
  • Empirical findings from space: human interactions during the Shuttle/Mir program
  • 92
  • Chapter 5.
  • Psychiatric Issues
  • 109
  • 1.1.
  • 1.3.3.
  • 5.1.
  • Normal reactions, abnormal reactions, and personal growth
  • 109
  • 5.2.
  • Psychiatric problems in space
  • 110
  • 5.2.1.
  • Adjustment disorders
  • 110
  • 5.2.2.
  • Research in space
  • Somatoform disorders
  • 111
  • 5.2.3.
  • Mood and thought disorders
  • 112
  • 5.2.4.
  • Post-mission effects: personality changes and marital problems
  • 114
  • 5.3.
  • Asthenia
  • 5
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.
  • A common space syndrome?
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.1.
  • Cultural issues
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.2.
  • Russian views of asthenia in space
  • 116
  • 1.4.1.
  • 5.3.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: asthenia and the Shuttle/Mir program
  • 118
  • 5.4.
  • Treatment considerations
  • 120
  • 5.4.1.
  • Counseling and psychotherapy
  • 120
  • 5.4.2.
  • Human performance
  • Psychoactive medications
  • 121
  • 5.5.
  • Psychiatric research in space
  • 123
  • Chapter 6.
  • Psychological Countermeasures
  • 131
  • 6.2.
  • Habitability factors
  • 6
  • 132
  • 6.3.
  • Work design issues
  • 136
  • 6.4.
  • Selection and crew composition
  • 138
  • 6.4.2.
  • Select-out: avoiding psychopathology
  • 139
  • 1.4.2.
  • 6.4.3.
  • Select in: the "right stuff"
  • 141
  • 6.4.4.
  • Crew composition: the problem of interpersonal compatibility
  • 144
  • 6.5.
  • Training
  • 147
  • 6.5.1.
  • Crew heterogeneity
  • Who should be trained?
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.
  • What kind of training can be applied?
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.1.
  • Briefings, lectures, and workshops
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.2.
  • Field exercises
  • 6
  • 151
  • 6.5.2.3.
  • Crew-oriented sensitivity training and team building
  • 151
  • 6.6.
  • Crew monitoring
  • 153
  • 6.6.1.
  • Remote monitoring from Earth
  • 153
  • 1.4.3.
  • 6.6.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: monitoring stress through voice analysis
  • 154
  • 6.6.3.
  • On-board monitoring
  • 156
  • 6.7.
  • In-flight support
  • 157
  • 6.7.1.
  • Humans in space
  • Cultural differences
  • Supportive measures for preventing feelings of monotony, boredom, and isolation
  • 158
  • 6.7.2.
  • Maintaining contact with family and friends
  • 158
  • 6.7.3.
  • Private psychological conferences
  • 159
  • 6.7.4.
  • Support of families on Earth
  • 7
  • 160
  • 6.8.
  • Post-flight readjustment support
  • 160
  • 6.8.1.
  • Individual issues
  • 160
  • 6.8.2.
  • Family issues
  • 161
  • 1.4.4.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Future Challenges
  • 173
  • 7.1.
  • Going beyond the Earth's orbit
  • 173
  • 7.2.
  • Future human missions to the Moon and Mars
  • 174
  • 7.2.1.
  • Time effects
  • Missions to the Moon and the establishment of a lunar base
  • 174
  • 7.2.2.
  • Exploratory missions to Mars
  • 175
  • 7.3.
  • Applicability of current psychological knowledge to space missions beyond the Earth's orbit
  • 176
  • 7.4.
  • Human missions to Mars: new psychological challenges
  • 7
  • 179
  • 7.4.1.
  • Individual adaptation and human performance
  • 179
  • 7.4.2.
  • Interpersonal issues
  • 181
  • 7.4.3.
  • Psychiatric issues
  • 183
  • 1.4.5.
  • 7.4.4.
  • Psychological countermeasures
  • 184
  • 7.4.5.
  • The Earth-out-of-view phenomenon
  • 186
  • 7.5.
  • Research directions
  • 186
  • Crew-ground relationship
  • 8
  • 1.4.6.
  • Psychological countermeasures
  • 1
  • 8
  • Chapter 2.
  • Basic Issues of Human Adaptation to Space Flight
  • 15
  • 2.1.
  • Space as an extreme environment
  • 15
  • 2.2.
  • Issues of physiological adaptation
  • 16
  • 1.2.
  • 2.3.
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms
  • 19
  • 2.3.1.
  • Empirical findings from space: phenomenology of sleep disturbances
  • 19
  • 2.3.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: sleep disturbances and circadian rhythms
  • 20
  • 2.3.3.
  • Stressors and stress in space
  • Operational significance
  • 22
  • 2.4.
  • Psychological adaptation to long-duration space flight: general characteristics
  • 24
  • 2.4.1.
  • Stages of adaptation over time
  • 24
  • 2.4.2.
  • Ground research on adaptation stages
  • 1
  • 25
  • 2.4.3.
  • Empirical findings from space: stages of psychological adaptation
  • 26
  • Chapter 3.
  • Human Performance
  • 35
  • 3.2.
  • Possible origins of cognitive performance decrements in space
  • 36
  • 1.3.1.
  • 3.2.1.
  • Effects of microgravity on specific brain mechanisms
  • 36
  • 3.2.2.
  • Effects of stress on mental performance
  • 37
  • 3.3.
  • Empirical findings from space: cognitive neuroscience research
  • 40
  • 3.3.1.
  • Anecdotal reports
  • Spatial orientation
  • 41
  • 3.3.2.
  • Spatial perception, imagery, and object recognition
  • 43
  • 3.3.3.
  • Mass discrimination
  • 45
  • 3.3.4.
  • Aimed voluntary movements
Control code
ocm52518813
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
xiv, 195 p.
Isbn
9781402013416
Lccn
2003057305
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill. (some col.)
Label
Space psychology and psychiatry, by Nick Kanas, Dietrich Manzey
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 3
  • 45
  • 3.4.
  • Empirical findings from space: human performance monitoring
  • 48
  • 3.4.1.
  • Results of performance monitoring during short-duration space flight
  • 50
  • 3.4.2.
  • Results of performance monitoring during long-duration space missions
  • 55
  • 1.3.2.
  • 3.4.3.
  • Impairments of tracking and dual-task performance in space: effects of microgravity, stress, or both?
  • 58
  • 3.5.
  • Complex cognitive and perceptual-motor skills
  • 61
  • 3.5.1.
  • Ground-based studies
  • 62
  • 3.5.2.
  • Space analog and simulation studies
  • Empricial findings from space: effects of stressors on complex cognitive and perceptual-motor skills
  • 63
  • Chapter 4.
  • Human Interactions
  • 75
  • 4.1.
  • Interpersonal issues
  • 75
  • 4.2.
  • Crew heterogeneity
  • 3
  • 76
  • 4.2.1.
  • Gender
  • 77
  • 4.2.2.
  • Cultural differences
  • 78
  • 4.2.3.
  • Career motivation and experiences
  • 80
  • 1.3.2.1.
  • 4.2.4.
  • Personality
  • 81
  • 4.2.5.
  • Problems related to crew heterogeneity
  • 83
  • 4.3.
  • Crew cohesion
  • 84
  • 4.3.1.
  • Settings
  • Time effects and mission stage
  • 84
  • 4.3.2.
  • Problems related to changes in cohesion
  • 85
  • 4.4.
  • Language and dialect variations
  • 86
  • 4.4.1.
  • Native language versus space terminology
  • 3
  • 86
  • 4.4.2.
  • Problems related to language and dialect variations
  • 87
  • 4.5.
  • Crew size
  • 87
  • 4.5.1.
  • The impact of size in small groups
  • 87
  • 1.3.2.2.
  • 4.5.2.
  • Problems related to crew size
  • 88
  • 4.6.
  • Leadership roles
  • 89
  • 4.6.1.
  • Task versus supportive roles
  • 89
  • 4.6.2.
  • Relevance to actual space missions
  • Problems related to leadership roles
  • 90
  • 4.7.
  • Crew-ground interactions
  • 90
  • 4.7.1.
  • Ingroup versus outgroup issues
  • 90
  • 4.7.2.
  • Displacement
  • 4
  • 91
  • 4.7.3.
  • Problems related to crew-ground interactions
  • 92
  • 4.8.
  • Empirical findings from space: human interactions during the Shuttle/Mir program
  • 92
  • Chapter 5.
  • Psychiatric Issues
  • 109
  • 1.1.
  • 1.3.3.
  • 5.1.
  • Normal reactions, abnormal reactions, and personal growth
  • 109
  • 5.2.
  • Psychiatric problems in space
  • 110
  • 5.2.1.
  • Adjustment disorders
  • 110
  • 5.2.2.
  • Research in space
  • Somatoform disorders
  • 111
  • 5.2.3.
  • Mood and thought disorders
  • 112
  • 5.2.4.
  • Post-mission effects: personality changes and marital problems
  • 114
  • 5.3.
  • Asthenia
  • 5
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.
  • A common space syndrome?
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.1.
  • Cultural issues
  • 115
  • 5.3.1.2.
  • Russian views of asthenia in space
  • 116
  • 1.4.1.
  • 5.3.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: asthenia and the Shuttle/Mir program
  • 118
  • 5.4.
  • Treatment considerations
  • 120
  • 5.4.1.
  • Counseling and psychotherapy
  • 120
  • 5.4.2.
  • Human performance
  • Psychoactive medications
  • 121
  • 5.5.
  • Psychiatric research in space
  • 123
  • Chapter 6.
  • Psychological Countermeasures
  • 131
  • 6.2.
  • Habitability factors
  • 6
  • 132
  • 6.3.
  • Work design issues
  • 136
  • 6.4.
  • Selection and crew composition
  • 138
  • 6.4.2.
  • Select-out: avoiding psychopathology
  • 139
  • 1.4.2.
  • 6.4.3.
  • Select in: the "right stuff"
  • 141
  • 6.4.4.
  • Crew composition: the problem of interpersonal compatibility
  • 144
  • 6.5.
  • Training
  • 147
  • 6.5.1.
  • Crew heterogeneity
  • Who should be trained?
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.
  • What kind of training can be applied?
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.1.
  • Briefings, lectures, and workshops
  • 148
  • 6.5.2.2.
  • Field exercises
  • 6
  • 151
  • 6.5.2.3.
  • Crew-oriented sensitivity training and team building
  • 151
  • 6.6.
  • Crew monitoring
  • 153
  • 6.6.1.
  • Remote monitoring from Earth
  • 153
  • 1.4.3.
  • 6.6.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: monitoring stress through voice analysis
  • 154
  • 6.6.3.
  • On-board monitoring
  • 156
  • 6.7.
  • In-flight support
  • 157
  • 6.7.1.
  • Humans in space
  • Cultural differences
  • Supportive measures for preventing feelings of monotony, boredom, and isolation
  • 158
  • 6.7.2.
  • Maintaining contact with family and friends
  • 158
  • 6.7.3.
  • Private psychological conferences
  • 159
  • 6.7.4.
  • Support of families on Earth
  • 7
  • 160
  • 6.8.
  • Post-flight readjustment support
  • 160
  • 6.8.1.
  • Individual issues
  • 160
  • 6.8.2.
  • Family issues
  • 161
  • 1.4.4.
  • Chapter 7.
  • Future Challenges
  • 173
  • 7.1.
  • Going beyond the Earth's orbit
  • 173
  • 7.2.
  • Future human missions to the Moon and Mars
  • 174
  • 7.2.1.
  • Time effects
  • Missions to the Moon and the establishment of a lunar base
  • 174
  • 7.2.2.
  • Exploratory missions to Mars
  • 175
  • 7.3.
  • Applicability of current psychological knowledge to space missions beyond the Earth's orbit
  • 176
  • 7.4.
  • Human missions to Mars: new psychological challenges
  • 7
  • 179
  • 7.4.1.
  • Individual adaptation and human performance
  • 179
  • 7.4.2.
  • Interpersonal issues
  • 181
  • 7.4.3.
  • Psychiatric issues
  • 183
  • 1.4.5.
  • 7.4.4.
  • Psychological countermeasures
  • 184
  • 7.4.5.
  • The Earth-out-of-view phenomenon
  • 186
  • 7.5.
  • Research directions
  • 186
  • Crew-ground relationship
  • 8
  • 1.4.6.
  • Psychological countermeasures
  • 1
  • 8
  • Chapter 2.
  • Basic Issues of Human Adaptation to Space Flight
  • 15
  • 2.1.
  • Space as an extreme environment
  • 15
  • 2.2.
  • Issues of physiological adaptation
  • 16
  • 1.2.
  • 2.3.
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms
  • 19
  • 2.3.1.
  • Empirical findings from space: phenomenology of sleep disturbances
  • 19
  • 2.3.2.
  • Empirical findings from space: sleep disturbances and circadian rhythms
  • 20
  • 2.3.3.
  • Stressors and stress in space
  • Operational significance
  • 22
  • 2.4.
  • Psychological adaptation to long-duration space flight: general characteristics
  • 24
  • 2.4.1.
  • Stages of adaptation over time
  • 24
  • 2.4.2.
  • Ground research on adaptation stages
  • 1
  • 25
  • 2.4.3.
  • Empirical findings from space: stages of psychological adaptation
  • 26
  • Chapter 3.
  • Human Performance
  • 35
  • 3.2.
  • Possible origins of cognitive performance decrements in space
  • 36
  • 1.3.1.
  • 3.2.1.
  • Effects of microgravity on specific brain mechanisms
  • 36
  • 3.2.2.
  • Effects of stress on mental performance
  • 37
  • 3.3.
  • Empirical findings from space: cognitive neuroscience research
  • 40
  • 3.3.1.
  • Anecdotal reports
  • Spatial orientation
  • 41
  • 3.3.2.
  • Spatial perception, imagery, and object recognition
  • 43
  • 3.3.3.
  • Mass discrimination
  • 45
  • 3.3.4.
  • Aimed voluntary movements
Control code
ocm52518813
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
xiv, 195 p.
Isbn
9781402013416
Lccn
2003057305
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
ill. (some col.)

Library Locations

    • Sydney Jones LibraryBorrow it
      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
Processing Feedback ...