Coverart for item
The Resource State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China

State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China

Label
State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China
Title
State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Pang, Qin
Dewey number
181.112
Index
no index present
LC call number
BL1840
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Confucianism and state
  • China
  • Confucianism and world politics
Label
State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Note on Romanization; Abbreviations; List of Figures; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 The Puzzling Confucian Revival in Contemporary Urban China; 1.1.1 Background; 1.1.2 The Puzzles; 1.1.3 Key Terms; 1.2 Why Study It?; 1.2.1 Ideological Control as a Research Gap in Studying China's Authoritarian Resilience; 1.2.2 Ideology as a Basis for Building Political Legitimacy; 1.2.3 Ideology in Post-Totalitarian China; 1.3 Confucianism and Its Historical Evolution; 1.3.1 Rationale for Choosing the Confucian Revival as Object for Study
  • 1.3.2 What Is Confucianism?1.3.3 The Historical Origins and Evolution of Confucianism; 1.3.3.1 The Emergence of the Confucian School; 1.3.3.2 The Rise of Confucianism as the State Cult; 1.3.3.3 The Rise of Neo-Confucianism During the Song Dynasty; 1.3.3.4 The Modern Decline of Confucianism and Its Revival in Contemporary China; 1.4 Confucianism and the CCP: An Odd Couple; 1.4.1 Philosophical Conflicts Between Confucianism and the Official Ideology; 1.4.2 Confucianism: Challenges from Both the Left and the Right; 1.5 Methodology and Data Collection; 1.6 Précis of the Book; References
  • Chapter 2: China's Mutually Empowering State and Society Relations2.1 Review of State-Society Relations: How States Deal with Societal Demand; 2.1.1 The Classical Debate Concerning State's Engagement with Society; 2.1.1.1 Defining "Society" and "State"; 2.1.1.2 The Society-Centered Paradigms; 2.1.1.3 The State-Centered Paradigms; 2.1.2 State's Management with Societal Demand; 2.1.2.1 Issues Areas and Power Resources; 2.1.2.2 State's Strategies: Co-optation and Coercion; 2.1.2.3 Effective Control and State Institutions; 2.2 State-Society Relations in China
  • 2.2.1 Chinese State and Society Relations in History2.2.1.1 The Imperial State's Control over Society in Pre-Modern China; 2.2.1.2 The Totalitarian State's Active Domination and Atomized Society's Silent Resistance in Mao's China (1949-1978)26; 2.2.2 The Debate of Contemporary Chinese State-Society Relations: The Post-Totalitarian State Versus the Strengthening Society; 2.2.2.1 The Pessimist Argument: Growing Societal Power and Possible Democratization; 2.2.2.2 The Optimist Argument: Strong Post-Totalitarian State and Authoritarian Resilience; References
  • Chapter 3: The Chinese State's Decentralized Response Towards the Confucian Revival and Its Institutional Base3.1 Previous Research Approaches to the Confucian Revival; 3.1.1 Instrumentalism and the Top-Down Control Model; 3.1.2 Primordialism and the Bottom-Up Model; 3.2 The State's "Decentralized Response" to the Confucian Revival; 3.2.1 Revival of Confucianism as a Bottom-Up Phenomenon; 3.2.2 The State's Decentralized Response Towards the Confucian Revival; 3.2.2.1 Defining Central Government, Local Government, and Decentralization
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811083129
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1038068084
  • (OCoLC)1038068084
Label
State-society relations and Confucian revivalism in contemporary China
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Preface; Acknowledgments; Contents; Note on Romanization; Abbreviations; List of Figures; List of Tables; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 The Puzzling Confucian Revival in Contemporary Urban China; 1.1.1 Background; 1.1.2 The Puzzles; 1.1.3 Key Terms; 1.2 Why Study It?; 1.2.1 Ideological Control as a Research Gap in Studying China's Authoritarian Resilience; 1.2.2 Ideology as a Basis for Building Political Legitimacy; 1.2.3 Ideology in Post-Totalitarian China; 1.3 Confucianism and Its Historical Evolution; 1.3.1 Rationale for Choosing the Confucian Revival as Object for Study
  • 1.3.2 What Is Confucianism?1.3.3 The Historical Origins and Evolution of Confucianism; 1.3.3.1 The Emergence of the Confucian School; 1.3.3.2 The Rise of Confucianism as the State Cult; 1.3.3.3 The Rise of Neo-Confucianism During the Song Dynasty; 1.3.3.4 The Modern Decline of Confucianism and Its Revival in Contemporary China; 1.4 Confucianism and the CCP: An Odd Couple; 1.4.1 Philosophical Conflicts Between Confucianism and the Official Ideology; 1.4.2 Confucianism: Challenges from Both the Left and the Right; 1.5 Methodology and Data Collection; 1.6 Précis of the Book; References
  • Chapter 2: China's Mutually Empowering State and Society Relations2.1 Review of State-Society Relations: How States Deal with Societal Demand; 2.1.1 The Classical Debate Concerning State's Engagement with Society; 2.1.1.1 Defining "Society" and "State"; 2.1.1.2 The Society-Centered Paradigms; 2.1.1.3 The State-Centered Paradigms; 2.1.2 State's Management with Societal Demand; 2.1.2.1 Issues Areas and Power Resources; 2.1.2.2 State's Strategies: Co-optation and Coercion; 2.1.2.3 Effective Control and State Institutions; 2.2 State-Society Relations in China
  • 2.2.1 Chinese State and Society Relations in History2.2.1.1 The Imperial State's Control over Society in Pre-Modern China; 2.2.1.2 The Totalitarian State's Active Domination and Atomized Society's Silent Resistance in Mao's China (1949-1978)26; 2.2.2 The Debate of Contemporary Chinese State-Society Relations: The Post-Totalitarian State Versus the Strengthening Society; 2.2.2.1 The Pessimist Argument: Growing Societal Power and Possible Democratization; 2.2.2.2 The Optimist Argument: Strong Post-Totalitarian State and Authoritarian Resilience; References
  • Chapter 3: The Chinese State's Decentralized Response Towards the Confucian Revival and Its Institutional Base3.1 Previous Research Approaches to the Confucian Revival; 3.1.1 Instrumentalism and the Top-Down Control Model; 3.1.2 Primordialism and the Bottom-Up Model; 3.2 The State's "Decentralized Response" to the Confucian Revival; 3.2.1 Revival of Confucianism as a Bottom-Up Phenomenon; 3.2.2 The State's Decentralized Response Towards the Confucian Revival; 3.2.2.1 Defining Central Government, Local Government, and Decentralization
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789811083129
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1038068084
  • (OCoLC)1038068084

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