Coverart for item
The Resource TV White Space Communications and Networks

TV White Space Communications and Networks

Label
TV White Space Communications and Networks
Title
TV White Space Communications and Networks
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
TV White Space Communications and Networks summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this important aspect of wireless communication. Part One covers related technologies, while Part Two looks at policy, regulation and standardization issues. Part Three discusses the commercialization and potential applications of white space networks, rounding out a comprehensive book that provides a standard reference for those researching and commercializing white space networks
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
Dewey number
621.388
Index
no index present
LC call number
TK6643
LC item number
.T8 2018
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Stewart, Robert W.
  • Crawford, David Dr
  • Sterling, Andrew
Series statement
Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Television broadcasting
  • Television
  • Television frequency allocation
  • Frequency spectra
  • TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING
  • Frequency spectra
  • Television broadcasting
  • Television frequency allocation
  • Television
Label
TV White Space Communications and Networks
Instantiates
Publication
Note
""3 Indoor-Outdoor TV White and Gray Space Availability: A U.S. Case Study""
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- TV White Space Communications and Networks -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- About the Editors -- 1 TV White Space Developments in the UK -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 What Are TV White Spaces? -- 1.3 What Does Available Mean? -- 1.4 Why TV Band Spectrum Is Valued -- 1.5 Origins of TVWS -- 1.5.1 A Short History of Terrestrial TV in the United Kingdom -- 1.6 The UK Road to TV White Spaces Regulation -- 1.6.1 A Brief Overview of UK Spectrum Regulation -- 1.6.2 Ofcom's Central Role in UK Spectrum Management
  • 1.6.3 Traditional Spectrum Management Uses Dedicated Allocations and Licensing1.6.4 Licence Exemption -- Assumed Access Permission -- 1.6.5 International Harmonisation of Spectrum Management -- 1.6.6 UK TV White Spaces -- The Enabling Regulations -- 1.6.7 Basis of Protection for the Licensed Services -- 1.6.8 Licence Exemption -- The Default Access Model for TV White Spaces -- 1.6.9 Determining Which Channels Would Be Available -- Spectrum Sensing -- Beacons -- Geolocation Database -- Ofcom Chose the Geolocation Database Approach
  • Determining the Transmitted Power Limits for White Space DevicesGeolocation Databases -- Manually Con gurable Device Licences -- An Interim Measure -- Regulatory Requirements on Licence-Exempt Devices -- The United Kingdom's Regulatory Journey Began in 2005/2006 -- 1.7 UK Industry Interest in TVWS Grew in Parallel With Regulatory Discussions -- 1.7.1 Rural Broadband De cit Was a Driver of Interest in TVWS -- 1.7.2 Spectrum Scarcity Was Another Driver -- 1.8 Proving the Value and Workability of TV White Spaces
  • 1.9 TV White Spaces Trial on the Isle of Bute, Scotland (2011 Onwards)1.10 The Cambridge White Spaces Trial (2011 to 2012) -- 1.10.1 Improving Broadband in a Rural Location -- 1.10.2 Machine-to-Machine Communication -- 1.10.3 Local Content Distribution -- 1.10.4 Location-Based Services -- 1.10.5 Input to Regulatory Working Groups -- 1.11 Ofcom's TV White Spaces Pilot (2013-2014) -- 1.12 Foundation of the Centre for White Space Communications -- 1.13 Applying White Spaces: Meeting Challenge of Scottish Rural Coverage -- 1.14 A Hybrid Access Technology Model Is Needed
  • 1.14.1 Point-to-Multipoint Architectures Can Lower Deployment Costs References -- Part I Technologies for TV White Space Networks -- 2 TV White Space Spectrum Sharing Using Geolocation Databases -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Role of a Geolocation Database -- 2.3 What Is Needed From Organisations Who Are Sharing -- 2.4 When a Geolocation Database Can Help -- 2.5 Interfaces of a Geolocation Database -- 2.6 Current Solutions -- 2.7 Conclusions -- References -- Part II Policy, Regulation and Standardisation Issues
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (234 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081006153
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Online access with subscription: Elsevier (Sciencedirect Freedom Collection)
Other control number
9780081006115
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1014422790
  • (OCoLC)1014422790
Label
TV White Space Communications and Networks
Publication
Note
""3 Indoor-Outdoor TV White and Gray Space Availability: A U.S. Case Study""
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Front Cover -- TV White Space Communications and Networks -- Copyright -- Contents -- Contributors -- Preface -- About the Editors -- 1 TV White Space Developments in the UK -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 What Are TV White Spaces? -- 1.3 What Does Available Mean? -- 1.4 Why TV Band Spectrum Is Valued -- 1.5 Origins of TVWS -- 1.5.1 A Short History of Terrestrial TV in the United Kingdom -- 1.6 The UK Road to TV White Spaces Regulation -- 1.6.1 A Brief Overview of UK Spectrum Regulation -- 1.6.2 Ofcom's Central Role in UK Spectrum Management
  • 1.6.3 Traditional Spectrum Management Uses Dedicated Allocations and Licensing1.6.4 Licence Exemption -- Assumed Access Permission -- 1.6.5 International Harmonisation of Spectrum Management -- 1.6.6 UK TV White Spaces -- The Enabling Regulations -- 1.6.7 Basis of Protection for the Licensed Services -- 1.6.8 Licence Exemption -- The Default Access Model for TV White Spaces -- 1.6.9 Determining Which Channels Would Be Available -- Spectrum Sensing -- Beacons -- Geolocation Database -- Ofcom Chose the Geolocation Database Approach
  • Determining the Transmitted Power Limits for White Space DevicesGeolocation Databases -- Manually Con gurable Device Licences -- An Interim Measure -- Regulatory Requirements on Licence-Exempt Devices -- The United Kingdom's Regulatory Journey Began in 2005/2006 -- 1.7 UK Industry Interest in TVWS Grew in Parallel With Regulatory Discussions -- 1.7.1 Rural Broadband De cit Was a Driver of Interest in TVWS -- 1.7.2 Spectrum Scarcity Was Another Driver -- 1.8 Proving the Value and Workability of TV White Spaces
  • 1.9 TV White Spaces Trial on the Isle of Bute, Scotland (2011 Onwards)1.10 The Cambridge White Spaces Trial (2011 to 2012) -- 1.10.1 Improving Broadband in a Rural Location -- 1.10.2 Machine-to-Machine Communication -- 1.10.3 Local Content Distribution -- 1.10.4 Location-Based Services -- 1.10.5 Input to Regulatory Working Groups -- 1.11 Ofcom's TV White Spaces Pilot (2013-2014) -- 1.12 Foundation of the Centre for White Space Communications -- 1.13 Applying White Spaces: Meeting Challenge of Scottish Rural Coverage -- 1.14 A Hybrid Access Technology Model Is Needed
  • 1.14.1 Point-to-Multipoint Architectures Can Lower Deployment Costs References -- Part I Technologies for TV White Space Networks -- 2 TV White Space Spectrum Sharing Using Geolocation Databases -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Role of a Geolocation Database -- 2.3 What Is Needed From Organisations Who Are Sharing -- 2.4 When a Geolocation Database Can Help -- 2.5 Interfaces of a Geolocation Database -- 2.6 Current Solutions -- 2.7 Conclusions -- References -- Part II Policy, Regulation and Standardisation Issues
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (234 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780081006153
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Note
Online access with subscription: Elsevier (Sciencedirect Freedom Collection)
Other control number
9780081006115
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1014422790
  • (OCoLC)1014422790

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