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The Resource The Ottoman Empire and the world around it, Suraiya Faroqhi

The Ottoman Empire and the world around it, Suraiya Faroqhi

Label
The Ottoman Empire and the world around it
Title
The Ottoman Empire and the world around it
Statement of responsibility
Suraiya Faroqhi
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Cataloging source
UKM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1941-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Faroqhi, Suraiya
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Library of Ottoman studies
Series volume
7.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Turkey
  • Turkey
  • Asia
  • Turkey
  • Europe
Label
The Ottoman Empire and the world around it, Suraiya Faroqhi
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [220]-262) and index
Contents
  • List of illustrations
  • note on transliteration and dates
  • Acknowledgements
  • Map of the Ottoman Empire in Asia and Africa
  • Map of the Ottoman Empire in Europe
  • 1.
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • Islamic law and sultanic pragmatism.
  • p. 2
  • Determining the parameters of Ottoman 'foreign policy': some general considerations.
  • p. 4
  • few ground rules of Ottoman 'foreign politics'.
  • p. 6
  • Validity and limits of the 'warfare state' model.
  • p. 8
  • Accommodation, both open and unacknowledged, and the problem of structural similarities in the early modern world.
  • p. 10
  • impossible balance between 'east' and 'west'?.
  • p. 11
  • Who, in which period, formed part of the Ottoman elite?.
  • p. 13
  • Ottoman Empire as a world economy.
  • p. 14
  • abiding centrality of Istanbul.
  • p. 16
  • Confronting our limits: problems of documentation.
  • p. 18
  • 'Placing' our topic in geographical terms.
  • p. 20
  • 'Placing' our topic in time.
  • p. 21
  • Confronting different perspectives, or how to justify comparisons.
  • p. 23
  • common world.
  • p. 25
  • 2.
  • On sovereignty and subjects: expanding and safeguarding the Empire.
  • p. 27
  • 'Foreign interference' and its limits.
  • p. 28
  • sequence of 'mental images'.
  • p. 30
  • 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 32
  • Introducing the major 'players' of the 1560s/967-77: the Habsburg possessions, France, Venice and Iran.
  • p. 32
  • Religious rivalries of the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 34
  • mid-sixteenth century: foreign subjects present on Ottoman territory - and those who were conspicuously absent.
  • p. 37
  • Religious-cum-political rivalries between the sultans and 'western' rulers in the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 41
  • How the Ottoman elite did not organize its relations with the outside world in the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 43
  • Limits of imperial reach in the 1560s/967-77: Anatolian loyalties to non-Ottoman princes.
  • p. 44
  • Limits of imperial reach: some Rumelian examples.
  • p. 46
  • Limits of imperial reach in the 1560s/967-77, a further example: Yemen as a frontier province.
  • p. 47
  • Empire in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 49
  • Protecting Ottoman territories in 1639/1048-9: the eastern frontier.
  • p. 49
  • northern regions as a trouble spot in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 50
  • Expanding Ottoman territory in 1639/1048-9: relations with Venice and the imminent conquest of Crete.
  • p. 51
  • Potential threats to Ottoman control over the western part of the Balkan peninsula in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 52
  • Early links to the seventeenth-century European world economy?.
  • p. 53
  • Before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 55
  • Wars on all fronts.
  • p. 55
  • 'The Empire strikes back': toward a reprise en main before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 58
  • Extraterritorialities before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 60
  • Conquest and trade as sources of regional instabilities before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 62
  • War-induced regional instabilities before 1718/1130-1: Serbs on both sides of the frontier.
  • p. 64
  • 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 67
  • Russo-Ottoman war of 1768-74/1181-8.
  • p. 67
  • Provincial power magnates and international relations in 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 69
  • Eighteenth-century prosperity and crisis in the 'economic' field.
  • p. 70
  • desert borders in 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 72
  • In conclusion: the Ottoman rulers within a set of alliances.
  • p. 73
  • 3.
  • On the margins of empire: clients and dependants.
  • p. 75
  • royal road to empire-building: from 'dependent principality' to 'centrally governed province'.
  • p. 75
  • 'Dependent principalities' with long life-spans.
  • p. 77
  • Ottoman methods of conquest and local realities.
  • p. 78
  • Old and new local powers in 'centrally governed provinces'.
  • p. 80
  • Semi-autonomous provinces controlled by military corps and 'political households'.
  • p. 82
  • case of the Hijaz.
  • p. 84
  • Subsidising a reticent dependant: the sherifs as autonomous princes on the desert frontier.
  • p. 84
  • sherifs, the Bedouins and the security of the pilgrimage caravan.
  • p. 87
  • sherifs in the international arena.
  • p. 88
  • case of Dubrovnik: linking Ottoman sultans to the Catholic Mediterranean.
  • p. 89
  • 'Cruel times in Moldavia'.
  • p. 91
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 95
  • 4.
  • strengths and weaknesses of Ottoman warfare.
  • p. 98
  • Ottoman military preparedness and booty-making: assessing their significance and limits.
  • p. 98
  • Ottoman political advantages in early modern wars.
  • p. 102
  • Financing wars and procuring supplies: the changing weight of tax assignments and cash disbursals.
  • p. 104
  • How to make war without footing the bill - at least in the short run.
  • p. 108
  • Logistics: cases of gunpowder.
  • p. 110
  • Societies of frontiersmen.
  • p. 112
  • Legitimacy through victory, delegitimization through wars on the sultan's territories.
  • p. 114
  • In conclusion: Ottoman society organized to keep up with the military reformation.
  • p. 116
  • 5.
  • Of prisoners, slaves and the charity of strangers.
  • p. 119
  • Prisoners in the shadows.
  • p. 119
  • Captured: how ordinary people paid the price of inter-empire conflict and attempts at state formation.
  • p. 121
  • From captive to slave.
  • p. 124
  • miseries of transportation.
  • p. 126
  • On galleys and in arsenals.
  • p. 127
  • Charity and the tribulations of prisoners.
  • p. 129
  • 'extra-curricular' labours of galley - and other - slaves.
  • p. 131
  • Domestic service.
  • p. 132
  • role of local mediation in ransoming a Christian prisoner.
  • p. 134
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 135
  • 6.
  • Trade and foreigners.
  • p. 137
  • Merchants from remote countries: the Asian world.
  • p. 138
  • Merchants from a (not so) remote Christian country: the Venetians.
  • p. 140
  • Polish traders and gentlemanly visitors.
  • p. 142
  • Merchants from the lands of a (doubtful) ally: France.
  • p. 144
  • Subjects of His/Her Majesty, the king/queen of England.
  • p. 148
  • Links to the capital of the seventeenth-century world economy: the Dutch case.
  • p. 150
  • How Ottoman merchants coped with foreigners and foreign trade.
  • p. 151
  • Revisiting an old debate: 'established' and 'new' commercial actors.
  • p. 154
  • Ottoman ruling group and its attitudes to foreign trade.
  • p. 155
  • 7.
  • Relating to pilgrims and offering mediation.
  • p. 161
  • problems of Iranian pilgrims in Iraq and the Hijaz.
  • p. 162
  • Jewish visitors to Jerusalem.
  • p. 164
  • Christian visitors writing about Palestine and the Sinai peninsula.
  • p. 165
  • Ottoman people and places in western accounts of Jerusalem.
  • p. 167
  • Christian pilgrimage to Jerusalem in Muslim eyes.
  • p. 169
  • Catholic missionaries in Ottoman lands.
  • p. 171
  • Mediations, ambiguities and shifts of identity.
  • p. 174
  • eighteenth-century Istanbul xenophobe.
  • p. 176
  • Was friendship between an Ottoman Muslim and a non-Muslim foreigner an impossible proposition?.
  • p. 177
  • 8.
  • Sources of information on the outside world.
  • p. 179
  • knowledge of the ambassadors: some general considerations.
  • p. 181
  • Fleeting encounters: a sea captain and diplomat in sixteenth-century India.
  • p. 183
  • knowledge of the envoys: representing Ottoman dignity in Iran.
  • p. 185
  • Lying abroad for the good of one's sovereign: obscuring Ottoman intentions in early eighteenth-century Iran.
  • p. 186
  • Reporting on European embassies.
  • p. 187
  • Old opponents, new allies.
  • p. 191
  • In the empire of the tsars.
  • p. 192
  • Difficult beginnings: a new type of information-gathering.
  • p. 193
  • Framing the world according to Ottoman geographers.
  • p. 194
  • Taking notice of the Americas.
  • p. 197
  • Katib Celebi and his circle.
  • p. 199
  • Non-Muslim Ottoman subjects and their travel writing.
  • p. 200
  • Tracking down the knowledge of the educated Muslim townsman.
  • p. 203
  • Evliya Celebi's stories about Europe.
  • p. 204
  • Holland and the way thither.
  • p. 204
  • European frontiers: a quantite negligeable?.
  • p. 206
  • And what about Evliya's intentions in writing?.
  • p. 207
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 208
  • 9.
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 211
  • common world.
  • p. 211
  • integration of foreigners.
  • p. 212
  • Imperial cohesion, 'corruption' and the liberties of foreigners.
  • p. 213
  • Coping with the European world economy.
  • p. 214
  • .
  • Ottoman rule: between the centre and the margins.
  • p. 215
  • .
  • Providing information: what 'respectable people' might or might not write about.
  • p. 216
  • .
  • Embassy reports: much maligned but a sign of changing mentalities.
  • p. 217
  • .
  • Bibliography.
  • p. 220
  • .
  • Notes.
  • p. 263
  • .
  • Index.
  • p. 283
Control code
ocm61260448
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xii, 290 p.
Isbn
9781845111229
Other physical details
ill., maps
Label
The Ottoman Empire and the world around it, Suraiya Faroqhi
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [220]-262) and index
Contents
  • List of illustrations
  • note on transliteration and dates
  • Acknowledgements
  • Map of the Ottoman Empire in Asia and Africa
  • Map of the Ottoman Empire in Europe
  • 1.
  • Introduction.
  • p. 1
  • Islamic law and sultanic pragmatism.
  • p. 2
  • Determining the parameters of Ottoman 'foreign policy': some general considerations.
  • p. 4
  • few ground rules of Ottoman 'foreign politics'.
  • p. 6
  • Validity and limits of the 'warfare state' model.
  • p. 8
  • Accommodation, both open and unacknowledged, and the problem of structural similarities in the early modern world.
  • p. 10
  • impossible balance between 'east' and 'west'?.
  • p. 11
  • Who, in which period, formed part of the Ottoman elite?.
  • p. 13
  • Ottoman Empire as a world economy.
  • p. 14
  • abiding centrality of Istanbul.
  • p. 16
  • Confronting our limits: problems of documentation.
  • p. 18
  • 'Placing' our topic in geographical terms.
  • p. 20
  • 'Placing' our topic in time.
  • p. 21
  • Confronting different perspectives, or how to justify comparisons.
  • p. 23
  • common world.
  • p. 25
  • 2.
  • On sovereignty and subjects: expanding and safeguarding the Empire.
  • p. 27
  • 'Foreign interference' and its limits.
  • p. 28
  • sequence of 'mental images'.
  • p. 30
  • 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 32
  • Introducing the major 'players' of the 1560s/967-77: the Habsburg possessions, France, Venice and Iran.
  • p. 32
  • Religious rivalries of the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 34
  • mid-sixteenth century: foreign subjects present on Ottoman territory - and those who were conspicuously absent.
  • p. 37
  • Religious-cum-political rivalries between the sultans and 'western' rulers in the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 41
  • How the Ottoman elite did not organize its relations with the outside world in the 1560s/967-77.
  • p. 43
  • Limits of imperial reach in the 1560s/967-77: Anatolian loyalties to non-Ottoman princes.
  • p. 44
  • Limits of imperial reach: some Rumelian examples.
  • p. 46
  • Limits of imperial reach in the 1560s/967-77, a further example: Yemen as a frontier province.
  • p. 47
  • Empire in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 49
  • Protecting Ottoman territories in 1639/1048-9: the eastern frontier.
  • p. 49
  • northern regions as a trouble spot in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 50
  • Expanding Ottoman territory in 1639/1048-9: relations with Venice and the imminent conquest of Crete.
  • p. 51
  • Potential threats to Ottoman control over the western part of the Balkan peninsula in 1639/1048-9.
  • p. 52
  • Early links to the seventeenth-century European world economy?.
  • p. 53
  • Before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 55
  • Wars on all fronts.
  • p. 55
  • 'The Empire strikes back': toward a reprise en main before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 58
  • Extraterritorialities before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 60
  • Conquest and trade as sources of regional instabilities before 1718/1130-1.
  • p. 62
  • War-induced regional instabilities before 1718/1130-1: Serbs on both sides of the frontier.
  • p. 64
  • 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 67
  • Russo-Ottoman war of 1768-74/1181-8.
  • p. 67
  • Provincial power magnates and international relations in 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 69
  • Eighteenth-century prosperity and crisis in the 'economic' field.
  • p. 70
  • desert borders in 1774/1187-8.
  • p. 72
  • In conclusion: the Ottoman rulers within a set of alliances.
  • p. 73
  • 3.
  • On the margins of empire: clients and dependants.
  • p. 75
  • royal road to empire-building: from 'dependent principality' to 'centrally governed province'.
  • p. 75
  • 'Dependent principalities' with long life-spans.
  • p. 77
  • Ottoman methods of conquest and local realities.
  • p. 78
  • Old and new local powers in 'centrally governed provinces'.
  • p. 80
  • Semi-autonomous provinces controlled by military corps and 'political households'.
  • p. 82
  • case of the Hijaz.
  • p. 84
  • Subsidising a reticent dependant: the sherifs as autonomous princes on the desert frontier.
  • p. 84
  • sherifs, the Bedouins and the security of the pilgrimage caravan.
  • p. 87
  • sherifs in the international arena.
  • p. 88
  • case of Dubrovnik: linking Ottoman sultans to the Catholic Mediterranean.
  • p. 89
  • 'Cruel times in Moldavia'.
  • p. 91
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 95
  • 4.
  • strengths and weaknesses of Ottoman warfare.
  • p. 98
  • Ottoman military preparedness and booty-making: assessing their significance and limits.
  • p. 98
  • Ottoman political advantages in early modern wars.
  • p. 102
  • Financing wars and procuring supplies: the changing weight of tax assignments and cash disbursals.
  • p. 104
  • How to make war without footing the bill - at least in the short run.
  • p. 108
  • Logistics: cases of gunpowder.
  • p. 110
  • Societies of frontiersmen.
  • p. 112
  • Legitimacy through victory, delegitimization through wars on the sultan's territories.
  • p. 114
  • In conclusion: Ottoman society organized to keep up with the military reformation.
  • p. 116
  • 5.
  • Of prisoners, slaves and the charity of strangers.
  • p. 119
  • Prisoners in the shadows.
  • p. 119
  • Captured: how ordinary people paid the price of inter-empire conflict and attempts at state formation.
  • p. 121
  • From captive to slave.
  • p. 124
  • miseries of transportation.
  • p. 126
  • On galleys and in arsenals.
  • p. 127
  • Charity and the tribulations of prisoners.
  • p. 129
  • 'extra-curricular' labours of galley - and other - slaves.
  • p. 131
  • Domestic service.
  • p. 132
  • role of local mediation in ransoming a Christian prisoner.
  • p. 134
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 135
  • 6.
  • Trade and foreigners.
  • p. 137
  • Merchants from remote countries: the Asian world.
  • p. 138
  • Merchants from a (not so) remote Christian country: the Venetians.
  • p. 140
  • Polish traders and gentlemanly visitors.
  • p. 142
  • Merchants from the lands of a (doubtful) ally: France.
  • p. 144
  • Subjects of His/Her Majesty, the king/queen of England.
  • p. 148
  • Links to the capital of the seventeenth-century world economy: the Dutch case.
  • p. 150
  • How Ottoman merchants coped with foreigners and foreign trade.
  • p. 151
  • Revisiting an old debate: 'established' and 'new' commercial actors.
  • p. 154
  • Ottoman ruling group and its attitudes to foreign trade.
  • p. 155
  • 7.
  • Relating to pilgrims and offering mediation.
  • p. 161
  • problems of Iranian pilgrims in Iraq and the Hijaz.
  • p. 162
  • Jewish visitors to Jerusalem.
  • p. 164
  • Christian visitors writing about Palestine and the Sinai peninsula.
  • p. 165
  • Ottoman people and places in western accounts of Jerusalem.
  • p. 167
  • Christian pilgrimage to Jerusalem in Muslim eyes.
  • p. 169
  • Catholic missionaries in Ottoman lands.
  • p. 171
  • Mediations, ambiguities and shifts of identity.
  • p. 174
  • eighteenth-century Istanbul xenophobe.
  • p. 176
  • Was friendship between an Ottoman Muslim and a non-Muslim foreigner an impossible proposition?.
  • p. 177
  • 8.
  • Sources of information on the outside world.
  • p. 179
  • knowledge of the ambassadors: some general considerations.
  • p. 181
  • Fleeting encounters: a sea captain and diplomat in sixteenth-century India.
  • p. 183
  • knowledge of the envoys: representing Ottoman dignity in Iran.
  • p. 185
  • Lying abroad for the good of one's sovereign: obscuring Ottoman intentions in early eighteenth-century Iran.
  • p. 186
  • Reporting on European embassies.
  • p. 187
  • Old opponents, new allies.
  • p. 191
  • In the empire of the tsars.
  • p. 192
  • Difficult beginnings: a new type of information-gathering.
  • p. 193
  • Framing the world according to Ottoman geographers.
  • p. 194
  • Taking notice of the Americas.
  • p. 197
  • Katib Celebi and his circle.
  • p. 199
  • Non-Muslim Ottoman subjects and their travel writing.
  • p. 200
  • Tracking down the knowledge of the educated Muslim townsman.
  • p. 203
  • Evliya Celebi's stories about Europe.
  • p. 204
  • Holland and the way thither.
  • p. 204
  • European frontiers: a quantite negligeable?.
  • p. 206
  • And what about Evliya's intentions in writing?.
  • p. 207
  • In conclusion.
  • p. 208
  • 9.
  • Conclusion.
  • p. 211
  • common world.
  • p. 211
  • integration of foreigners.
  • p. 212
  • Imperial cohesion, 'corruption' and the liberties of foreigners.
  • p. 213
  • Coping with the European world economy.
  • p. 214
  • .
  • Ottoman rule: between the centre and the margins.
  • p. 215
  • .
  • Providing information: what 'respectable people' might or might not write about.
  • p. 216
  • .
  • Embassy reports: much maligned but a sign of changing mentalities.
  • p. 217
  • .
  • Bibliography.
  • p. 220
  • .
  • Notes.
  • p. 263
  • .
  • Index.
  • p. 283
Control code
ocm61260448
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xii, 290 p.
Isbn
9781845111229
Other physical details
ill., maps

Library Locations

    • Sydney Jones LibraryBorrow it
      Chatham Street, Liverpool, L7 7BD, GB
      53.403069 -2.963723
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