Coverart for item
The Resource The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods : government policies and market practices, Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Peter W.B. Phillips, Justus Wesseler, Stuart J. Smyth, editors

The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods : government policies and market practices, Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Peter W.B. Phillips, Justus Wesseler, Stuart J. Smyth, editors

Label
The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods : government policies and market practices
Title
The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods
Title remainder
government policies and market practices
Statement of responsibility
Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Peter W.B. Phillips, Justus Wesseler, Stuart J. Smyth, editors
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Since their commercial introduction in 1996, genetically modified (GM) crops have been adopted by farmers around the world at impressive rates. In 2011, 180 million hectares of GM crops were cultivated by more than 15 million farmers in 29 countries. In the next decade, global adoption is expected to grow even faster as the research pipeline for new biotech traits and crops has increased almost fourfold in the last few years. The adoption of GM crops has led to increased productivity, while reducing pesticide use and the emissions of agricultural greenhouse gases, leading to broadly distributed economic benefits across the global food supply chain. Despite the rapid uptake of GM crops, the various social and economic benefits as well as the expanding rate innovation, the use of GM crops remains controversial in parts of the world. Despite the emergence of coexistence between GM, organic and conventional crops as a key policy and practical issue of global scale, there is no coherent literature that addresses it directly. Governments and market stakeholders in many countries are grappling with policy alternatives that settle conflicting property rights, minimize negative market externalities and associated liabilities, maximize the economic benefits of innovation and allow producer and consumer choice. This book intends to fill these needs with contributions from the top theoreticians, legal and economic analysts, policy makers and industry practitioners in the field. As the economics and policy of coexistence start to emerge as an separate subfield in agricultural, environmental and natural resource economics with an increasing number of scholars working on the topic, the book will also provide a comprehensive base in the literature for those entering the area, making it of interest to students, scholars and policy-makers alike
Member of
Cataloging source
IDEBK
Dewey number
664
Index
index present
LC call number
TP248.65.F66
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1960-
  • 1963-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G.
  • Phillips, Peter W. B
  • Wesseler, Justus
  • Smyth, Stuart J
Series statement
Natural resource management and policy
Series volume
volume 49
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Genetically modified foods
  • Natural foods
  • Organic farming
Label
The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods : government policies and market practices, Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Peter W.B. Phillips, Justus Wesseler, Stuart J. Smyth, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Editors and Contributors; 1 Introduction to the Issue of Coexistence; What is the Issue?; The Scale and Scope of Coexistence Issues; Objectives for This Book; Structure of the Book; References; 2 The Science of Gene Flow in Agriculture and Its Role in Coexistence; Introduction; Managing Gene Flow in Agriculture; Understanding the Implications of Gene Flow; The Seed Industry Model; Crop Considerations; Self-Pollinating Species; Outcrossing Crops; Case Studies; Alfalfa; Cereals; Biofuel Crops; Trees; Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Biological Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies
  • Genic Male SterilityCMS and Maternal Inheritance; Transgene Excision; Conditional Seed Viability; Prospects for Engineered Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Practical Implications of Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Diverse Markets and Economic Considerations; Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; 3 Developing Market Driven Standards for Coexistence: Tolerances, Thresholds, and Other Technical Standards Used by the Seed Industry; Seed Industry Best Practices; Lot Tracking/Preventing Physical Mixing; Methods of Controlling Pollen Flow; Seed Purity Testing; Seed Quality Programs
  • Biotechnology and CoexistenceSummary; Resources; 4 Economic and Legal Principles of Coexistence Policy in North America; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary; References; 5 Organic Label Rules and Market Tensions: The Challenge of Satisfying Buyers; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary; References; 6 Developing Solutions for Coexistence in the EU-Legal, Technical, and Economic Issues; What Does Coexistence Mean for the EU?; The European Coexistence Bureau; The Way Ahead; Acknowledgment; References
  • 7 The Principle(s) of Co-existence in the Market for GMOs in Europe: Social, Economic and Legal AvenuesIntroduction; Principles-Based Versus Rules-Based Regulation; The Principle(s) of Co-existence in the EU; The Information Paradigm, or: The Right to Choose; Principle of Proportionality; Precautionary Principle; Principle that the Polluter Shall Pay; Subsidiarity Principle; Economic Evaluation of These Principles; Conclusion; References; 8 Coexistence in Brazil; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary/Synthesis; References
  • 9 What Can We Learn About Coexistence from Commercial Non-GM Programs in the US?Survey of US GM and Non-GM Producers; Demographics and Farm Characteristics; Incentives for Participation in Non-GM Production; Potential Constraints on Non-GM Production; Conclusion: Is There a Market Failure to Correct?; References; 10 Lessons from the Legal Cases of GM Alfalfa and Sugar Beet Deregulation in the United States; Overview; The USDA Mandate; Judicial Review; The Geertson Litigation; The Supreme Court Monsanto Decision; The CFS Litigation; The CFS I Litigation; The CFS II Litigation
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781493937271
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • SPR961340796
  • ocn961340796
Label
The coexistence of genetically modified, organic and conventional foods : government policies and market practices, Nicholas Kalaitzandonakes, Peter W.B. Phillips, Justus Wesseler, Stuart J. Smyth, editors
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Editors and Contributors; 1 Introduction to the Issue of Coexistence; What is the Issue?; The Scale and Scope of Coexistence Issues; Objectives for This Book; Structure of the Book; References; 2 The Science of Gene Flow in Agriculture and Its Role in Coexistence; Introduction; Managing Gene Flow in Agriculture; Understanding the Implications of Gene Flow; The Seed Industry Model; Crop Considerations; Self-Pollinating Species; Outcrossing Crops; Case Studies; Alfalfa; Cereals; Biofuel Crops; Trees; Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Biological Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies
  • Genic Male SterilityCMS and Maternal Inheritance; Transgene Excision; Conditional Seed Viability; Prospects for Engineered Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Practical Implications of Gene Flow Mitigation Strategies; Diverse Markets and Economic Considerations; Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; 3 Developing Market Driven Standards for Coexistence: Tolerances, Thresholds, and Other Technical Standards Used by the Seed Industry; Seed Industry Best Practices; Lot Tracking/Preventing Physical Mixing; Methods of Controlling Pollen Flow; Seed Purity Testing; Seed Quality Programs
  • Biotechnology and CoexistenceSummary; Resources; 4 Economic and Legal Principles of Coexistence Policy in North America; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary; References; 5 Organic Label Rules and Market Tensions: The Challenge of Satisfying Buyers; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary; References; 6 Developing Solutions for Coexistence in the EU-Legal, Technical, and Economic Issues; What Does Coexistence Mean for the EU?; The European Coexistence Bureau; The Way Ahead; Acknowledgment; References
  • 7 The Principle(s) of Co-existence in the Market for GMOs in Europe: Social, Economic and Legal AvenuesIntroduction; Principles-Based Versus Rules-Based Regulation; The Principle(s) of Co-existence in the EU; The Information Paradigm, or: The Right to Choose; Principle of Proportionality; Precautionary Principle; Principle that the Polluter Shall Pay; Subsidiarity Principle; Economic Evaluation of These Principles; Conclusion; References; 8 Coexistence in Brazil; Introduction; Background; Critical Assessment; Coexistence Consequences; Summary/Synthesis; References
  • 9 What Can We Learn About Coexistence from Commercial Non-GM Programs in the US?Survey of US GM and Non-GM Producers; Demographics and Farm Characteristics; Incentives for Participation in Non-GM Production; Potential Constraints on Non-GM Production; Conclusion: Is There a Market Failure to Correct?; References; 10 Lessons from the Legal Cases of GM Alfalfa and Sugar Beet Deregulation in the United States; Overview; The USDA Mandate; Judicial Review; The Geertson Litigation; The Supreme Court Monsanto Decision; The CFS Litigation; The CFS I Litigation; The CFS II Litigation
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781493937271
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • SPR961340796
  • ocn961340796

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