Coverart for item
The Resource The connections between ecology and infectious disease, Christon J. Hurst, editor

The connections between ecology and infectious disease, Christon J. Hurst, editor

Label
The connections between ecology and infectious disease
Title
The connections between ecology and infectious disease
Statement of responsibility
Christon J. Hurst, editor
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book summarizes current advances in our understanding of how infectious disease represents an ecological interaction between a pathogenic microorganism and the host species in which that microbe causes illness. The contributing authors explain that pathogenic microorganisms often also have broader ecological connections, which can include a natural environmental presence; possible transmission by vehicles such as air, water, and food; and interactions with other host species, including vectors for which the microbe either may or may not be pathogenic. This field of science has been dubbed disease ecology, and the chapters that examine it have been grouped into three sections. The first section introduces both the role of biological community interactions and the impact of biodiversity on infectious disease. In turn, the second section considers those diseases directly affecting humans, with a focus on waterborne and foodborne illnesses, while also examining the critical aspect of microbial biofilms. Lastly, the third section presents the ecology of infectious diseases from the perspective of their impact on mammalian livestock and wildlife as well as on humans. Given its breadth of coverage, the volume offers a valuable resource for microbial ecologists and biomedical scientists alike
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
571.9
Index
no index present
LC call number
QH541.15.E265
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1954-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hurst, Christon J.
Series statement
Advances in environmental microbiology
Series volume
5
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Ecosystem health
  • Host-parasite relationships
Label
The connections between ecology and infectious disease, Christon J. Hurst, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Series Preface; Volume Preface; Contents; Part I: Introduction to Disease Ecology; Chapter 1: Interkingdom Community Interactions in Disease Ecology; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Background of Microbial Interkingdom Interactions; 1.3 Mechanisms of Interkingdom Interactions in Disease Ecology; 1.3.1 Horizontal Gene Transfer; 1.3.1.1 Bacteria-to-Eukaryote HGT; 1.3.1.2 HGT of Small RNAs; 1.3.1.3 Eukaryote-to-Bacteria HGT; 1.3.2 Hormonal Signaling; 1.3.2.1 Amine Hormones; 1.3.2.2 Peptide Hormones; 1.3.2.3 Interplay Between Stress Response and Interkingdom Interactions; 1.3.3 Molecular Mimicry
  • 1.3.4 Sensing the Host Immune System1.3.4.1 Bacterial Sensing of Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides; 1.3.5 Nutritional Signaling; 1.3.6 Interkingdom Signaling with Nonmammalian Hosts; 1.3.7 Quorum Sensing Systems and Disease Ecology; 1.3.7.1 Quorum Sensing Regulates Behavior of Eukaryotes; 1.4 Microbiomes and Vertebrates and Disease Ecology; 1.4.1 Influence of Ontogeny and Life History on Microbiomes; 1.4.2 Host Manipulation by the Microbiome; 1.4.2.1 Human Hosts; 1.4.2.2 Nonhuman Vertebrate Hosts; 1.4.3 Current Sequencing Tools; 1.5 Synthesis for Disease Ecology; References
  • Chapter 2: Biodiversity and Disease Transmission2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The Links Between Biological Diversity, Cultural Diversity, and Disease Diversity; 2.3 Global Changes; 2.4 Habitat Changes; 2.5 Community Changes; 2.5.1 Dilution Effect; 2.5.2 Invasion; 2.5.3 Trophic Web; 2.5.4 Multi-infection; 2.5.5 Synanthropic Species; 2.6 Investigating Mechanisms Using Network Analyses; 2.7 Conclusion: Disease Ecology in the Anthropocene Defaunation; References; Part II: The Ecology of Infectious DiseasesAffecting Humans
  • Chapter 3: Understanding and Estimating the Risk of Waterborne Infectious Disease Associated with Drinking Water3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Disease Transmission Routes; 3.2.1 Disease Transmission by Environmental Water Routes; 3.2.1.1 Animal Reservoirs of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.2 Human Reservoirs of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.3 The Fate of Microbial Contaminants in Water; 3.2.1.4 Aquatic Microbes as a Reservoir of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.5 The Interconnected Environmental Flow of Water and Its Microbial Contaminants
  • 3.2.1.5.1 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Surface Water3.2.1.5.2 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Land Surfaces; 3.2.1.5.3 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Ground Water; 3.2.2 Microbial Contaminants Get Transferred Around the House, Health Care Settings, and Even in Space Travel Environments; 3.3 The Concept of Modeling Transmission of Disease Through Host Populations: Epidemic Versus Endemic; 3.4 Prevention Is the Best Solution for Infectious Disease; 3.4.1 Using Immunization to Prevent Infectious Disease
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319923710
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1050448369
  • (OCoLC)1050448369
Label
The connections between ecology and infectious disease, Christon J. Hurst, editor
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Intro; Series Preface; Volume Preface; Contents; Part I: Introduction to Disease Ecology; Chapter 1: Interkingdom Community Interactions in Disease Ecology; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Background of Microbial Interkingdom Interactions; 1.3 Mechanisms of Interkingdom Interactions in Disease Ecology; 1.3.1 Horizontal Gene Transfer; 1.3.1.1 Bacteria-to-Eukaryote HGT; 1.3.1.2 HGT of Small RNAs; 1.3.1.3 Eukaryote-to-Bacteria HGT; 1.3.2 Hormonal Signaling; 1.3.2.1 Amine Hormones; 1.3.2.2 Peptide Hormones; 1.3.2.3 Interplay Between Stress Response and Interkingdom Interactions; 1.3.3 Molecular Mimicry
  • 1.3.4 Sensing the Host Immune System1.3.4.1 Bacterial Sensing of Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides; 1.3.5 Nutritional Signaling; 1.3.6 Interkingdom Signaling with Nonmammalian Hosts; 1.3.7 Quorum Sensing Systems and Disease Ecology; 1.3.7.1 Quorum Sensing Regulates Behavior of Eukaryotes; 1.4 Microbiomes and Vertebrates and Disease Ecology; 1.4.1 Influence of Ontogeny and Life History on Microbiomes; 1.4.2 Host Manipulation by the Microbiome; 1.4.2.1 Human Hosts; 1.4.2.2 Nonhuman Vertebrate Hosts; 1.4.3 Current Sequencing Tools; 1.5 Synthesis for Disease Ecology; References
  • Chapter 2: Biodiversity and Disease Transmission2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The Links Between Biological Diversity, Cultural Diversity, and Disease Diversity; 2.3 Global Changes; 2.4 Habitat Changes; 2.5 Community Changes; 2.5.1 Dilution Effect; 2.5.2 Invasion; 2.5.3 Trophic Web; 2.5.4 Multi-infection; 2.5.5 Synanthropic Species; 2.6 Investigating Mechanisms Using Network Analyses; 2.7 Conclusion: Disease Ecology in the Anthropocene Defaunation; References; Part II: The Ecology of Infectious DiseasesAffecting Humans
  • Chapter 3: Understanding and Estimating the Risk of Waterborne Infectious Disease Associated with Drinking Water3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Disease Transmission Routes; 3.2.1 Disease Transmission by Environmental Water Routes; 3.2.1.1 Animal Reservoirs of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.2 Human Reservoirs of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.3 The Fate of Microbial Contaminants in Water; 3.2.1.4 Aquatic Microbes as a Reservoir of Waterborne Microbial Contaminants; 3.2.1.5 The Interconnected Environmental Flow of Water and Its Microbial Contaminants
  • 3.2.1.5.1 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Surface Water3.2.1.5.2 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Land Surfaces; 3.2.1.5.3 Diseases Acquired from Microbially Contaminated Ground Water; 3.2.2 Microbial Contaminants Get Transferred Around the House, Health Care Settings, and Even in Space Travel Environments; 3.3 The Concept of Modeling Transmission of Disease Through Host Populations: Epidemic Versus Endemic; 3.4 Prevention Is the Best Solution for Infectious Disease; 3.4.1 Using Immunization to Prevent Infectious Disease
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319923710
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • on1050448369
  • (OCoLC)1050448369

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