Coverart for item
The Resource The foundations of physical law, Peter Rowlands, (electronic book)

The foundations of physical law, Peter Rowlands, (electronic book)

Label
The foundations of physical law
Title
The foundations of physical law
Statement of responsibility
Peter Rowlands
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The book originated in a series of lectures given at Liverpool in 2013 to a group that included postgraduate and undergraduate students and staff of the Physics Department. They followed from two very successful lectures given to the undergraduate Physical Society. It seemed that there was a very large interest among the students in investigating the foundations of physics in a way that was never done in physics courses, and was not available in books or other outlets. However, the idea was to create a framework in which students (and interested staff) could develop their own thinking relative
Member of
Cataloging source
E7B
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rowlands, Peter
Dewey number
530
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QC21.3
LC item number
.R68 2015eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Physics
  • Mathematical physics
  • Quantum theory
Label
The foundations of physical law, Peter Rowlands, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; Contents; 1. Introduction to Foundational Physics; 1.1 What do we mean by foundations of physics?; 1.2 How do we study it?; 1.3 Avoiding the arbitrary; 1.4 Totality zero; 1.5 What questions should we ask?; 2. Mathematical Ideas and Methods; 2.1 Quaternions and octonions; 2.2 Clifford algebra; 2.3 Groups; 2.4 Nilpotents and idempotents; 2.5 Standard and non-standard analysis; 2.6 Topology; 2.7 Key numbers in duality, anticommutativity and symmetry-breaking; 2.8 Some significant group tables; 3. The Most Primitive Concepts; 3.1 What are the most primitive concepts in physics?
  • 3.2 Measurement3.3 Conservation and nonconservation; 3.4 Real and imaginary; 3.5 Commutative and anticommutative; 4. A Fundamental Symmetry; 4.1 A key group; 4.2 Visual representations; 4.3 Two spaces?; 4.4 A unified algebra; 4.5 Nipotency; 4.6 The symmetry-breaking between charges; 4.7 The parameters in the dual group; 4.8 Conservation of angular momentum and conservation of type of charge; 5. Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics I; 5.1 The Dirac equation; 5.2 The nilpotent Dirac equation; 5.3 Using discrete differentiation; 5.4 Idempotents and nilpotents; 5.5 Pauli exclusion; 5.6 Vacuum
  • 5.7 Quantum mechanics and the quantum field5.8 Spin and helicity; 5.9 Zitterbewegung and Berry phase; 5.10 CPT symmetry; 6. Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics II; 6.1 Bosons; 6.2 Baryons; 6.3 Partitioning the vacuum; 6.4 Local and nonlocal; 6.5 The Coulomb (electric) interaction; 6.6 The strong interaction; 6.7 The weak interaction; 7. Nilpotent Quantum Field Theory; 7.1 A perturbation calculation; 7.2 Cancellation of loops; 7.3 Propagators; 7.4 A weak interaction calculation; 7.5 BRST quantization; 7.6 Mass generation; 7.7 String theory; 7.8 One-fermion theory
  • 7.9 Dualities in nilpotent quantum theory8. Gravity; 8.1 General relativity or quantum mechanics?; 8.2 Gravity and quantum mechanics; 8.3 General relativity and Newtonian theory; 8.4 The effect of observation on nonlocal gravity; 8.5 The aberration of space; 8.6 Gravitomagnetic effects; 8.7 Maxwell's equations for gravitomagnetism; 8.8 Mach's principle; 8.9 Can we quantize gravitational inertia?; 8.10 Extended causality and quantized inertia; 9. Particles; 9.1 Particle structures from nilpotent quantum mechanics; 9.2 Phase diagrams; 9.3 Dirac equation for charge
  • 9.4 Fermionic states from the algebra9.5 Equation for specifying particle states; 9.6 Tables of particle structures; 9.7 SU(5); 9.8 Quarks; 9.9 Grand Unification: a prediction; 9.10 The Higgs mechanism and fermion masses; 9.11 Larger group structures for fermions and bosons; 10. Return to Symmetries; 10.1 A universal rewrite system; 10.2 Mathematical representation; 10.3 Physical application; 10.4 Entropy and information; 10.5 Duality and the factor 2; 10.6 Anticommutativity and the factor 3; 10.7 Symmetry and self-organization; References; Index
Control code
ocn893673204
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (262 pages)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
SINGLE USER ACCESS. This e-book is restricted to one viewer at any one time. You may download a chapter or page range (subject to the same limits as for printing) as a permanent PDF image file for use on a computer or e-book reading device (including a Kindle)
Isbn
9789814618397
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
Label
The foundations of physical law, Peter Rowlands, (electronic book)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; Contents; 1. Introduction to Foundational Physics; 1.1 What do we mean by foundations of physics?; 1.2 How do we study it?; 1.3 Avoiding the arbitrary; 1.4 Totality zero; 1.5 What questions should we ask?; 2. Mathematical Ideas and Methods; 2.1 Quaternions and octonions; 2.2 Clifford algebra; 2.3 Groups; 2.4 Nilpotents and idempotents; 2.5 Standard and non-standard analysis; 2.6 Topology; 2.7 Key numbers in duality, anticommutativity and symmetry-breaking; 2.8 Some significant group tables; 3. The Most Primitive Concepts; 3.1 What are the most primitive concepts in physics?
  • 3.2 Measurement3.3 Conservation and nonconservation; 3.4 Real and imaginary; 3.5 Commutative and anticommutative; 4. A Fundamental Symmetry; 4.1 A key group; 4.2 Visual representations; 4.3 Two spaces?; 4.4 A unified algebra; 4.5 Nipotency; 4.6 The symmetry-breaking between charges; 4.7 The parameters in the dual group; 4.8 Conservation of angular momentum and conservation of type of charge; 5. Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics I; 5.1 The Dirac equation; 5.2 The nilpotent Dirac equation; 5.3 Using discrete differentiation; 5.4 Idempotents and nilpotents; 5.5 Pauli exclusion; 5.6 Vacuum
  • 5.7 Quantum mechanics and the quantum field5.8 Spin and helicity; 5.9 Zitterbewegung and Berry phase; 5.10 CPT symmetry; 6. Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics II; 6.1 Bosons; 6.2 Baryons; 6.3 Partitioning the vacuum; 6.4 Local and nonlocal; 6.5 The Coulomb (electric) interaction; 6.6 The strong interaction; 6.7 The weak interaction; 7. Nilpotent Quantum Field Theory; 7.1 A perturbation calculation; 7.2 Cancellation of loops; 7.3 Propagators; 7.4 A weak interaction calculation; 7.5 BRST quantization; 7.6 Mass generation; 7.7 String theory; 7.8 One-fermion theory
  • 7.9 Dualities in nilpotent quantum theory8. Gravity; 8.1 General relativity or quantum mechanics?; 8.2 Gravity and quantum mechanics; 8.3 General relativity and Newtonian theory; 8.4 The effect of observation on nonlocal gravity; 8.5 The aberration of space; 8.6 Gravitomagnetic effects; 8.7 Maxwell's equations for gravitomagnetism; 8.8 Mach's principle; 8.9 Can we quantize gravitational inertia?; 8.10 Extended causality and quantized inertia; 9. Particles; 9.1 Particle structures from nilpotent quantum mechanics; 9.2 Phase diagrams; 9.3 Dirac equation for charge
  • 9.4 Fermionic states from the algebra9.5 Equation for specifying particle states; 9.6 Tables of particle structures; 9.7 SU(5); 9.8 Quarks; 9.9 Grand Unification: a prediction; 9.10 The Higgs mechanism and fermion masses; 9.11 Larger group structures for fermions and bosons; 10. Return to Symmetries; 10.1 A universal rewrite system; 10.2 Mathematical representation; 10.3 Physical application; 10.4 Entropy and information; 10.5 Duality and the factor 2; 10.6 Anticommutativity and the factor 3; 10.7 Symmetry and self-organization; References; Index
Control code
ocn893673204
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (262 pages)
Form of item
online
Governing access note
SINGLE USER ACCESS. This e-book is restricted to one viewer at any one time. You may download a chapter or page range (subject to the same limits as for printing) as a permanent PDF image file for use on a computer or e-book reading device (including a Kindle)
Isbn
9789814618397
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote

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