Coverart for item
The Resource Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information

Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information

Label
Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information
Title
Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information
Creator
Contributor
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Athreya, Balu H
Dewey number
370
Index
no index present
LC call number
L1-991
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Mouza, Chrystalla
Label
Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; About the Authors; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction to Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation; 1.1 Scope of the Work; 1.1.1 What Is the Main Message of This Book?; 1.1.2 How Is This Book Different?; 1.2 Thinking and Human Brain; 1.3 Thinking and Memory; 1.4 Book Content; 1.5 Significance; References; Chapter 2: The Digital Generation; 2.1 Defining the Digital Generation; 2.2 Technology and Media Use by Children 0-10; 2.3 Technology and Media Use by Tweens and Teens; 2.4 Technology and Media Use by College Students; 2.5 Learning Preferences of Young People
  • 2.6 Guidelines for Technology Use2.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 3: What Is Thinking?; 3.1 Defining Thinking; 3.2 Types of Thinking; 3.2.1 Reflexive and Low-Level Analytical Thinking; 3.2.2 Reflective Thinking; 3.2.3 Critical Thinking; 3.2.4 Creative Thinking; 3.2.5 Convergent and Divergent Thinking; 3.2.6 Inductive and Deductive Thinking; 3.2.7 Concrete Thinking; 3.2.8 Abstract Thinking; 3.2.9 Analytical and Synthetic Thinking; 3.2.10 Connective and Substitutive Thinking; 3.2.11 Computational Thinking; 3.2.12 Systems Thinking; 3.2.13 Meditative Thinking; 3.3 Purpose of Thinking
  • 3.4 Main MessageReferences; Chapter 4: The Thinking Process; 4.1 Background on the Thinking Process; 4.2 Why We Need to Think on Our Own; 4.2.1 The Battle Over Our Minds; 4.2.2 The Influence of Media; 4.3 Steps in the Thinking Process; 4.4 Adjuncts to Thinking; 4.4.1 Listening Skills; 4.4.2 Language and Thinking; 4.4.2.1 Words as Symbols; 4.4.2.2 Denotations and Connotations; 4.4.2.3 Changes in Meaning; 4.4.2.4 Levels of Meaning; 4.4.2.5 Ambiguity in Language; 4.4.2.6 Abstraction; 4.4.2.7 The Map and the Territory; 4.4.2.8 Emotions and Language
  • 4.4.2.9 Learning from Semantics to Develop Good Thinking Skills4.5 Neurobiology of Thinking; 4.5.1 Default Network; 4.5.2 The Limbic System; 4.5.3 The Reward Circuitry; 4.5.4 Executive Functions; 4.6 Basic Modes of Thinking; 4.6.1 Perception and Response Process; 4.6.2 Pattern-Making Process; 4.6.3 Reflexive and Reflective Thinking Process; 4.6.4 System 1 Thinking Process; 4.6.5 System 2 Thinking Process; 4.6.6 Intuitive Thinking of Experts; 4.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 5: Sources of Information for Thinking; 5.1 Role of Information in Thinking: Why is Information Important?
  • 5.2 Locating Information: From Oral History, to Printing Press, to the Internet5.3 Information Seeking Models; 5.4 Information-Seeking Behavior; 5.5 Challenges in Navigating the Information Landscape; 5.6 Information Literacy: Thinking with Information; 5.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 6: Internet and Thinking; 6.1 Historical and Conceptual Perspectives on Cognition and Technology; 6.1.1 What Does It Mean to Be Smarter?; 6.2 Internet and Reading; 6.3 Internet and Attention; 6.4 Internet and Multitasking; 6.5 Internet and Decision-Making; 6.6 Main Message; References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319123646
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn966445237
Label
Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation: The Development of Thinking and Learning in the Age of Information
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; About the Authors; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction to Thinking Skills for the Digital Generation; 1.1 Scope of the Work; 1.1.1 What Is the Main Message of This Book?; 1.1.2 How Is This Book Different?; 1.2 Thinking and Human Brain; 1.3 Thinking and Memory; 1.4 Book Content; 1.5 Significance; References; Chapter 2: The Digital Generation; 2.1 Defining the Digital Generation; 2.2 Technology and Media Use by Children 0-10; 2.3 Technology and Media Use by Tweens and Teens; 2.4 Technology and Media Use by College Students; 2.5 Learning Preferences of Young People
  • 2.6 Guidelines for Technology Use2.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 3: What Is Thinking?; 3.1 Defining Thinking; 3.2 Types of Thinking; 3.2.1 Reflexive and Low-Level Analytical Thinking; 3.2.2 Reflective Thinking; 3.2.3 Critical Thinking; 3.2.4 Creative Thinking; 3.2.5 Convergent and Divergent Thinking; 3.2.6 Inductive and Deductive Thinking; 3.2.7 Concrete Thinking; 3.2.8 Abstract Thinking; 3.2.9 Analytical and Synthetic Thinking; 3.2.10 Connective and Substitutive Thinking; 3.2.11 Computational Thinking; 3.2.12 Systems Thinking; 3.2.13 Meditative Thinking; 3.3 Purpose of Thinking
  • 3.4 Main MessageReferences; Chapter 4: The Thinking Process; 4.1 Background on the Thinking Process; 4.2 Why We Need to Think on Our Own; 4.2.1 The Battle Over Our Minds; 4.2.2 The Influence of Media; 4.3 Steps in the Thinking Process; 4.4 Adjuncts to Thinking; 4.4.1 Listening Skills; 4.4.2 Language and Thinking; 4.4.2.1 Words as Symbols; 4.4.2.2 Denotations and Connotations; 4.4.2.3 Changes in Meaning; 4.4.2.4 Levels of Meaning; 4.4.2.5 Ambiguity in Language; 4.4.2.6 Abstraction; 4.4.2.7 The Map and the Territory; 4.4.2.8 Emotions and Language
  • 4.4.2.9 Learning from Semantics to Develop Good Thinking Skills4.5 Neurobiology of Thinking; 4.5.1 Default Network; 4.5.2 The Limbic System; 4.5.3 The Reward Circuitry; 4.5.4 Executive Functions; 4.6 Basic Modes of Thinking; 4.6.1 Perception and Response Process; 4.6.2 Pattern-Making Process; 4.6.3 Reflexive and Reflective Thinking Process; 4.6.4 System 1 Thinking Process; 4.6.5 System 2 Thinking Process; 4.6.6 Intuitive Thinking of Experts; 4.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 5: Sources of Information for Thinking; 5.1 Role of Information in Thinking: Why is Information Important?
  • 5.2 Locating Information: From Oral History, to Printing Press, to the Internet5.3 Information Seeking Models; 5.4 Information-Seeking Behavior; 5.5 Challenges in Navigating the Information Landscape; 5.6 Information Literacy: Thinking with Information; 5.7 Main Message; References; Chapter 6: Internet and Thinking; 6.1 Historical and Conceptual Perspectives on Cognition and Technology; 6.1.1 What Does It Mean to Be Smarter?; 6.2 Internet and Reading; 6.3 Internet and Attention; 6.4 Internet and Multitasking; 6.5 Internet and Decision-Making; 6.6 Main Message; References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783319123646
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
ocn966445237

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