Coverart for item
The Resource Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems, Robert P. Mason, (electronic book)

Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems, Robert P. Mason, (electronic book)

Label
Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems
Title
Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems
Statement of responsibility
Robert P. Mason
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book provides a detailed examination of the concentration, form and cycling of trace metals and metalloids through the aquatic biosphere, and has sections dealing with the atmosphere, the ocean, lakes and rivers. It discusses exchanges at the water interface (air/water and sediment/water) and the major drivers of the cycling, concentration and form of trace metals in aquatic systems. The initial chapters focus on the fundamental principles and modelling approaches needed to understand metal concentration, speciation and fate in the aquatic environment, while the later chapters focus on
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1956-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mason, Robert Peter
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Trace elements
  • Water
  • Water chemistry
Label
Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems, Robert P. Mason, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
4.2 The underlying basis and application of chemical equilibrium models
Contents
  • Cover; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; About the companion website; CHAPTER 1: Introduction; 1.1 A historical background to metal aquatic chemistry; 1.2 Historical problems with metal measurements in environmental media; 1.3 Recent advances in aquatic metal analysis; References; Problems; CHAPTER 2: An introduction to the cycling of metals in the biosphere; 2.1 The hydrologic cycle; 2.2 An introduction to the global cycling of trace metal(loid)s; 2.2.1 The sources and cycling of metal(loid)s in the biosphere; 2.2.2 Metal(loid) partitioning and solubility in natural waters
  • 2.2.3 Human influence over metal(loid) fate and transport2.2.4 Trace metal(loid) inputs to the atmosphere; 2.2.5 Metal(loid)s in the terrestrial environment and freshwater ecosystems; 2.2.6 The transport of metal(loid)s to the ocean; 2.2.7 Trace metal(loid)s in ocean waters; 2.2.8 Trace metal(loid) inputs from hydrothermal vents; 2.3 Global cycles of some important trace metals; 2.3.1 The global cycles of cadmium, copper, and zinc; 2.3.2 The global cycle of mercury and lead; 2.4 Chapter summary; References; Problems
  • CHAPTER 3: Chemical thermodynamics and metal(loid) complexation in natural waters3.1 Thermodynamic background for understanding trace metal(loid) complexation; 3.1.1 The relationship between free energy and the equilibrium constant; 3.1.2 Ionic strength effects; 3.1.3 Thermodynamic equilibrium, kinetics and steady state; 3.2 Bonding, electronic configuration, and complex formation; 3.2.1 Ligand Field Theory; 3.2.2 Thermodynamic effects of orbital splitting; 3.2.3 Inorganic chemistry and complexation of transition metals
  • 3.2.4 Inorganic chemistry and complexation of non-transition metals and metalloids3.3 Complexation of metals in solution; 3.3.1 Inorganic complexation; 3.3.2 An approach to determining metal(loid) speciation in solution; 3.3.3 The chemistry and speciation of metal-binding ligands; 3.3.4 The complexation of the major ions in solution; 3.3.5 Metal complexation with low molecular weight organic ligands; 3.3.6 Complexation to large molecular weight organic matter; 3.4 Trace metal interactions with the solid phase; 3.4.1 Precipitation and dissolution; 3.4.2 Adsorption of metals to aqueous solids
  • 3.4.3 Dissolved-particulate partition coefficients3.4.4 Adsorption isotherms; 3.4.5 A complexation-based model for adsorption; 3.5 Redox transformations and thermodynamic calculations; 3.5.1 Electrochemistry and the equilibrium constant; 3.5.2 The range in electrode potential and the stability of water; 3.5.3 Equilibrium calculations involving redox reactions; 3.5.4 Environmental considerations and controlling reactions; 3.6 Chapter summary; References; Problems; CHAPTER 4: Modeling approaches to estimating speciation and interactions in aqueous systems; 4.1 Introduction
Control code
ocn829459896
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (443 p.)
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Isbn
9781118274576
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Trace Metals in Aquatic Systems, Robert P. Mason, (electronic book)
Publication
Note
4.2 The underlying basis and application of chemical equilibrium models
Contents
  • Cover; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; About the companion website; CHAPTER 1: Introduction; 1.1 A historical background to metal aquatic chemistry; 1.2 Historical problems with metal measurements in environmental media; 1.3 Recent advances in aquatic metal analysis; References; Problems; CHAPTER 2: An introduction to the cycling of metals in the biosphere; 2.1 The hydrologic cycle; 2.2 An introduction to the global cycling of trace metal(loid)s; 2.2.1 The sources and cycling of metal(loid)s in the biosphere; 2.2.2 Metal(loid) partitioning and solubility in natural waters
  • 2.2.3 Human influence over metal(loid) fate and transport2.2.4 Trace metal(loid) inputs to the atmosphere; 2.2.5 Metal(loid)s in the terrestrial environment and freshwater ecosystems; 2.2.6 The transport of metal(loid)s to the ocean; 2.2.7 Trace metal(loid)s in ocean waters; 2.2.8 Trace metal(loid) inputs from hydrothermal vents; 2.3 Global cycles of some important trace metals; 2.3.1 The global cycles of cadmium, copper, and zinc; 2.3.2 The global cycle of mercury and lead; 2.4 Chapter summary; References; Problems
  • CHAPTER 3: Chemical thermodynamics and metal(loid) complexation in natural waters3.1 Thermodynamic background for understanding trace metal(loid) complexation; 3.1.1 The relationship between free energy and the equilibrium constant; 3.1.2 Ionic strength effects; 3.1.3 Thermodynamic equilibrium, kinetics and steady state; 3.2 Bonding, electronic configuration, and complex formation; 3.2.1 Ligand Field Theory; 3.2.2 Thermodynamic effects of orbital splitting; 3.2.3 Inorganic chemistry and complexation of transition metals
  • 3.2.4 Inorganic chemistry and complexation of non-transition metals and metalloids3.3 Complexation of metals in solution; 3.3.1 Inorganic complexation; 3.3.2 An approach to determining metal(loid) speciation in solution; 3.3.3 The chemistry and speciation of metal-binding ligands; 3.3.4 The complexation of the major ions in solution; 3.3.5 Metal complexation with low molecular weight organic ligands; 3.3.6 Complexation to large molecular weight organic matter; 3.4 Trace metal interactions with the solid phase; 3.4.1 Precipitation and dissolution; 3.4.2 Adsorption of metals to aqueous solids
  • 3.4.3 Dissolved-particulate partition coefficients3.4.4 Adsorption isotherms; 3.4.5 A complexation-based model for adsorption; 3.5 Redox transformations and thermodynamic calculations; 3.5.1 Electrochemistry and the equilibrium constant; 3.5.2 The range in electrode potential and the stability of water; 3.5.3 Equilibrium calculations involving redox reactions; 3.5.4 Environmental considerations and controlling reactions; 3.6 Chapter summary; References; Problems; CHAPTER 4: Modeling approaches to estimating speciation and interactions in aqueous systems; 4.1 Introduction
Control code
ocn829459896
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (443 p.)
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Isbn
9781118274576
Specific material designation
remote

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