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The Resource Transducers and arrays for underwater sound, by Charles H. Sherman, John L. Butler, (electronic book)

Transducers and arrays for underwater sound, by Charles H. Sherman, John L. Butler, (electronic book)

Label
Transducers and arrays for underwater sound
Title
Transducers and arrays for underwater sound
Statement of responsibility
by Charles H. Sherman, John L. Butler
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
DE-He213
Characteristic
online system or service
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1928-2009
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Sherman, Charles H.
Image bit depth
0
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Butler, John L.
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Acoustics
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Physics
Label
Transducers and arrays for underwater sound, by Charles H. Sherman, John L. Butler, (electronic book)
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
mixed
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
not applicable
Contents
Cover -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Brief History of Underwater Sound Transducers -- 1.2 Underwater Transducer Applications -- 1.3 General Description of Linear Electroacoustic Transduction -- 1.4 Transducer Characteristics -- 1.4.1 Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient -- 1.4.2 Transducer Responses, Directivity Index and Source Level -- 1.5 Transducer Arrays -- References -- Chapter 2: Electroacoustic Transduction -- 2.1 Piezoelectric Transducers -- 2.1.1 General -- 2.1.2 The 33-Mode Longitudinal Vibrator -- 2.1.3 The 31-Mode Longitudinal Vibrator -- 2.2 Electrostrictive Transducers -- 2.3 Magnetostrictive Transducers -- 2.4 Electrostatic Transducers -- 2.5 Variable Reluctance Transducers -- 2.6 Moving Coil Transducers -- 2.7 Comparison of Transduction Mechanisms -- 2.8 Equivalent Circuits -- 2.8.1 Equivalent Circuit Basics -- 2.8.2 Circuit Resonance -- 2.8.3 Circuit Q and Bandwidth -- 2.8.4 Power Factor and Tuning -- 2.8.5 Power Limits -- 2.8.6 Efficiency -- 2.8.7 Hydrophone Circuit and Noise -- 2.8.8 Extended Equivalent Circuits -- References -- Chapter 3: Transducers as Projectors -- 3.1 Principles of Operation -- 3.2 Ring and Spherical Transducers -- 3.2.1 Piezoelectric 31-Mode Ring -- 3.2.2 Piezoelectric 33-Mode Ring -- 3.2.3 The Spherical Transducer -- 3.2.4 The Magnetostrictive Ring -- 3.2.5 Free Flooded Rings -- 3.2.6 Multimode Rings -- 3.3 Piston Transducers -- 3.3.1 The Tonpilz Projector -- 3.3.2 The Hybrid Transducer -- 3.4 Transmission Line Transducers -- 3.4.1 Sandwich Transducers -- 3.4.2 Wideband Transmission Line Transducers -- 3.4.3 Large Plate Transducers -- 3.4.4 Composite Transducers -- 3.5 Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.1 The Class IV and VII Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.2 The Class I Barrel Stave Flextensional -- 3.5.3 The Class V and VI Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.4 The Astroid and X-spring Flextensional Transducers -- 3.6 Flexural Transducers -- 3.6.1 Bender Bar Transducer -- 3.6.2 Bender Disc Transducer -- 3.6.3 The Slotted Cylinder Transducer -- 3.6.4 The Bender Mode X-spring Transducer -- References -- Chapter 4: Transducers as Hydrophones -- 4.1 Principles of Operation -- 4.1.1 Sensitivity -- 4.1.2 Figure of Merit -- 4.1.3 Simplified Equivalent Circuit -- 4.1.4 Other Sensitivity Considerations -- 4.2 Cylindrical and Spherical Hydrophones -- 4.2.1 Performance with Shielded Ends -- 4.2.2 Spherical Hydrophones -- 4.2.3 Performance with End Caps -- 4.3 Planar Hydrophones -- 4.3.1 Tonpilz Hydrophones -- 4.3.2 The 1-3 Composite Hydrophone -- 4.3.3 Flexible Hydrophones -- 4.4 Bender Hydrophones -- 4.5 Vector Hydrophones -- 4.5.1 Dipole Vector Sensors, Baffles, and Images -- 4.5.2 Pressure Gradient Vector Sensor -- 4.5.3 Velocity Vector Sensor -- 4.5.4 Accelerometer Sensitivity -- 4.5.5 Mu
Dimensions
unknown
File format
multiple file formats
Isbn
9780387331393
Level of compression
uncompressed
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote
Label
Transducers and arrays for underwater sound, by Charles H. Sherman, John L. Butler, (electronic book)
Publication
Antecedent source
mixed
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Color
not applicable
Contents
Cover -- Contents -- Series Preface -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Brief History of Underwater Sound Transducers -- 1.2 Underwater Transducer Applications -- 1.3 General Description of Linear Electroacoustic Transduction -- 1.4 Transducer Characteristics -- 1.4.1 Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient -- 1.4.2 Transducer Responses, Directivity Index and Source Level -- 1.5 Transducer Arrays -- References -- Chapter 2: Electroacoustic Transduction -- 2.1 Piezoelectric Transducers -- 2.1.1 General -- 2.1.2 The 33-Mode Longitudinal Vibrator -- 2.1.3 The 31-Mode Longitudinal Vibrator -- 2.2 Electrostrictive Transducers -- 2.3 Magnetostrictive Transducers -- 2.4 Electrostatic Transducers -- 2.5 Variable Reluctance Transducers -- 2.6 Moving Coil Transducers -- 2.7 Comparison of Transduction Mechanisms -- 2.8 Equivalent Circuits -- 2.8.1 Equivalent Circuit Basics -- 2.8.2 Circuit Resonance -- 2.8.3 Circuit Q and Bandwidth -- 2.8.4 Power Factor and Tuning -- 2.8.5 Power Limits -- 2.8.6 Efficiency -- 2.8.7 Hydrophone Circuit and Noise -- 2.8.8 Extended Equivalent Circuits -- References -- Chapter 3: Transducers as Projectors -- 3.1 Principles of Operation -- 3.2 Ring and Spherical Transducers -- 3.2.1 Piezoelectric 31-Mode Ring -- 3.2.2 Piezoelectric 33-Mode Ring -- 3.2.3 The Spherical Transducer -- 3.2.4 The Magnetostrictive Ring -- 3.2.5 Free Flooded Rings -- 3.2.6 Multimode Rings -- 3.3 Piston Transducers -- 3.3.1 The Tonpilz Projector -- 3.3.2 The Hybrid Transducer -- 3.4 Transmission Line Transducers -- 3.4.1 Sandwich Transducers -- 3.4.2 Wideband Transmission Line Transducers -- 3.4.3 Large Plate Transducers -- 3.4.4 Composite Transducers -- 3.5 Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.1 The Class IV and VII Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.2 The Class I Barrel Stave Flextensional -- 3.5.3 The Class V and VI Flextensional Transducers -- 3.5.4 The Astroid and X-spring Flextensional Transducers -- 3.6 Flexural Transducers -- 3.6.1 Bender Bar Transducer -- 3.6.2 Bender Disc Transducer -- 3.6.3 The Slotted Cylinder Transducer -- 3.6.4 The Bender Mode X-spring Transducer -- References -- Chapter 4: Transducers as Hydrophones -- 4.1 Principles of Operation -- 4.1.1 Sensitivity -- 4.1.2 Figure of Merit -- 4.1.3 Simplified Equivalent Circuit -- 4.1.4 Other Sensitivity Considerations -- 4.2 Cylindrical and Spherical Hydrophones -- 4.2.1 Performance with Shielded Ends -- 4.2.2 Spherical Hydrophones -- 4.2.3 Performance with End Caps -- 4.3 Planar Hydrophones -- 4.3.1 Tonpilz Hydrophones -- 4.3.2 The 1-3 Composite Hydrophone -- 4.3.3 Flexible Hydrophones -- 4.4 Bender Hydrophones -- 4.5 Vector Hydrophones -- 4.5.1 Dipole Vector Sensors, Baffles, and Images -- 4.5.2 Pressure Gradient Vector Sensor -- 4.5.3 Velocity Vector Sensor -- 4.5.4 Accelerometer Sensitivity -- 4.5.5 Mu
Dimensions
unknown
File format
multiple file formats
Isbn
9780387331393
Level of compression
uncompressed
Quality assurance targets
absent
Reformatting quality
access
Specific material designation
remote

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